Alzheimer's Disease

Deadly toxins in shark fin soup linked to Alzheimer's

Deadly toxins in shark fin soup linked to Alzheimer'sWashington, Feb 24 - The growing demand for shark fin soup is not only endangering the marine species, but is also a deadly threat to brain health because of high neurotoxin levels.

University of Miami (UM) scientists discovered high concentrations of neurotoxin BMAA in shark fins, linked with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's Disease.


Alzheimer's drugs may have serious side-effects

Alzheimer's drugs may have serious side-effectsWashington, Feb 20 - Drugs for Alzheimer's disease currently undergoing clinical trials may have adverse side-effects, warns a new study.

The drugs could act like a bad electrician, causing neurons (nerve cells) to be miswired and tripping their ability to message the brain, suggests the study.


Stem cell-derived neurons may help find cause of Alzheimer’s

 Stem cell-derived neurons may help find cause of Alzheimer’s London, Jan 26 : Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding the causes of Alzheimer's disease, which could potentially lead to the development of new drugs to treat it.


Taking B-vitamins can slow onset of Alzheimer’s disease

Taking B-vitamins can slow onset of Alzheimer’s diseaseLondon, Sept 14 : A new study has found that large doses of B-vitamins could slow the cognitive decline in older people that is the precursor to dementias such as Alzheimer's disease.


High cholesterol linked to Alzheimer's

High cholesterol linked to Alzheimer'sWashington, Sep 13 - People with high cholesterol may have a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a study says.

"We found that high cholesterol levels were significantly related to brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease," said study author Kensuke Sasaki, of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan, in a press release.


Moderate drinkers quarter less prone to Alzheimer''s, cognitive impairment

Moderate drinkers quarter less prone to Alzheimer''s, cognitive impairmentWashington, August 17: Moderate social drinking - a maximum of two drinks per day for men and 1 drink per day for women - significantly reduces the risk of dementia and cognitive impairment, according to a new study.


Inherited Alzheimer’s detectable as early as 20 yrs before dementia onset

 Inherited Alzheimer’s detectable as early as 20 yrs before dementia onsetWashington, July 21: Scientists have discovered that inherited forms of Alzheimer's disease may be detected as early as 20 years before problems with memory and thinking develop.

They say the results demonstrate the feasibility of clinical trials to prevent Alzheimer's in patients who are at risk.


How living a healthier lifestyle can prevent Alzheimer’s

How living a healthier lifestyle can prevent Alzheimer’sLondon, July 19 : A study has found that Alzheimer's can be prevented by making some simple lifestyle changes like smoking less and exercising more.

Study author Dr Deborah Barnes, from San Francisco VA Medical Centre, called the findings "exciting".


How metallic molecules highlight Alzheimer’s roots

How metallic molecules highlight Alzheimer’s rootsWashington, July 14 : A new study has found that metallic molecules can highlight Alzheimer's roots when they naturally attach themselves to a collection of beta amyloid proteins called fibrils.

Fibrils form plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's sufferers, and when the molecules, complexes of dipyridophenazine ruthenium, latch onto amyloid fibrils, their photoluminescence increases 50-fold.


Factor X in coffee boosts protection against Alzheimer's

AlzheimerWashington, June 30 : An unidentified component of coffee interacts with the beverage's caffeine which seemingly offers protection against Alzheimer's.

A new mouse study by University of South Florida has found that this interaction boosts blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to counteract Alzheimer's disease process.


Cinnamon can help both prevent and cure Alzheimer''s disease

Cinnamon can help both prevent and cure Alzheimer''s diseaseWashington, June 28: A new study has revealed that cinnamon has the potential to prevent the degenerative brain disorder, Alzheimer''s disease, which affects at least one in eight Americans over the age of
65.

A team of researchers from the Tel Aviv University (TAU) discovered `Ceppt', the cinnamon extract obtained from its bark that curbs the progression of Alzheimer''s.


‘Molecular cap’ blocks processes that lead to Alzheimer’s, HIV

‘Molecular cap’ blocks processes that lead to Alzheimer’s, HIVLondon, June 24 : Scientists designed molecular inhibitors that could delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease and prevent the sexual transmission of HIV.


Natural method paves way for better treatment of Alzheimer''s

 Natural method paves way for better treatment of Alzheimer''s Washington, June 21: Scientists have shown a molecular chaperone is working like a waste management company to collect and detoxify high levels of toxic amyloid beta peptide found in Alzheimer''s disease.

It was known that the molecular chaperone, HspB1, was present in the hallmark plaque of Alzheimer''s patients but its role remained a mystery.


Novel ''prodrug'' may help fight Huntington''s, Alzheimer''s

Novel ''prodrug'' may help fight Huntington''s, Alzheimer''sWashington, June 3: Researchers have developed a new `prodrug' slow-release compound that can protect mice from the neurodegenerative effects of both Huntington''s and Alzheimer''s disease.

The ''prodrug'' known as JM6 works through a pathway involved in the breakdown of the amino acid tryptophan.


Potential new drug compound for Alzheimer''s disease discovered

 Potential new drug compound for Alzheimer''s disease discoveredWashington, June 2: Scientists have discovered a new compound, which could be a potential therapy for Alzheimer''s disease.


Scientists find noncoding RNA may promote Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists find noncoding RNA may promote Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 31: Scientists have pinpointed a small RNA that spurs cells to manufacture a particular splice variant of a key neuronal protein, potentially promoting Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other types of neurodegeneration.

Although scientists have identified numerous proteins and RNAs that influence alternative splicing, they haven't deciphered how cells fine-tune the process to produce specific protein versions.


Scientists come closer to finding cause of Alzheimer''s disease

Scientists come closer to finding cause of Alzheimer''s disease Washington, May 31 : Scientists have come a step closer to finding out what the causes of Alzheimer''s disease are.

Recently the number of genes known to be associated with Alzheimer''s disease has increased from four to eight, including the MS4A gene cluster on chromosome 11.


Stress ups Alzheimer''s disease risk

 Stress ups Alzheimer''s disease riskWashington, May 28 : Scientists have discovered that the increased release of stress hormones in rats leads to the generation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Naturally occurring plant alkaloids could slow down Alzheimer’s disease

 Naturally occurring plant alkaloids could slow down Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 27: A new study has found that a family of naturally occurring plant compounds could help prevent or delay memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease.

The study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) showed that beta-carboline alkaloids could potentially be used in therapeutic drugs to stop, or at least slow down, the progressively debilitating effects of Alzheimer's.


Release of stress hormones increases risk for Alzheimer’s disease

 Release of stress hormones increases risk for Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 27 : Scientists have found that the increased release of stress hormones could ultimately lead to Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich found stress hormones in rats lead to generation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Stress may aggravate Alzheimer's risk

Stress may aggravate Alzheimer's riskLondon, May 27 : Don't stress yourself too much, else an increased release of stress hormones could trigger Alzheimer's disease, to go by new research based on mice. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany, have discovered that increased release of stress hormones in rats leads to production of excess tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Protein responsible for leukaemia linked to Alzheimer''s disease

 Protein responsible for leukaemia linked to Alzheimer''s diseaseWashington, May 25: The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research scientists have discovered that a molecule c-Abl, which has a known role in leukaemia, also has a hand in Alzheimer''s disease.

The finding offers a new target for drug development that could stave off the pathological disease process.


Lithium slows development of Alzheimer's: Research

AlzheimerLondon, April 28 : A trial of 41 people over 60 years with mild cognitive impairment, a precursor to full-blown Alzheimer's, found that the rate of mental decline was lower in the half given 150 mg of lithium daily, compared to those given a simulated medical intervention.

While all participants showed a decline in memory function and attention tasks over the years, the rate of decline among those on lithium was significantly less.


Tobacco-derived compound prevents memory loss in Alzheimer’s

 Tobacco-derived compound prevents memory loss in Alzheimer’s Washington, April 28: A study led by researchers at Bay Pines VA Healthcare System and the University of South Florida has found that Cotinine, a compound derived from tobacco, reduced plaques associated with dementia and prevented memory loss in a mouse model of Alzheimer''s disease.


People with thin brain structure ‘at greater risk for Alzheimer''s’

Alzheimer's DiseaseWashington, April 14 : Researchers from Rush University Medical Center and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) found that, among individuals in whom specific brain structures were thinnest, the risk of developing Alzheimer''s was three times greater than in those with above-average thickness.


Syndicate content