Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists find noncoding RNA may promote Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists find noncoding RNA may promote Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 31: Scientists have pinpointed a small RNA that spurs cells to manufacture a particular splice variant of a key neuronal protein, potentially promoting Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other types of neurodegeneration.

Although scientists have identified numerous proteins and RNAs that influence alternative splicing, they haven't deciphered how cells fine-tune the process to produce specific protein versions.


Scientists come closer to finding cause of Alzheimer''s disease

Scientists come closer to finding cause of Alzheimer''s disease Washington, May 31 : Scientists have come a step closer to finding out what the causes of Alzheimer''s disease are.

Recently the number of genes known to be associated with Alzheimer''s disease has increased from four to eight, including the MS4A gene cluster on chromosome 11.


Stress ups Alzheimer''s disease risk

 Stress ups Alzheimer''s disease riskWashington, May 28 : Scientists have discovered that the increased release of stress hormones in rats leads to the generation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Naturally occurring plant alkaloids could slow down Alzheimer’s disease

 Naturally occurring plant alkaloids could slow down Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 27: A new study has found that a family of naturally occurring plant compounds could help prevent or delay memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease.

The study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) showed that beta-carboline alkaloids could potentially be used in therapeutic drugs to stop, or at least slow down, the progressively debilitating effects of Alzheimer's.


Release of stress hormones increases risk for Alzheimer’s disease

 Release of stress hormones increases risk for Alzheimer’s diseaseWashington, May 27 : Scientists have found that the increased release of stress hormones could ultimately lead to Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich found stress hormones in rats lead to generation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Stress may aggravate Alzheimer's risk

Stress may aggravate Alzheimer's riskLondon, May 27 : Don't stress yourself too much, else an increased release of stress hormones could trigger Alzheimer's disease, to go by new research based on mice. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany, have discovered that increased release of stress hormones in rats leads to production of excess tau protein in the brain and ultimately, memory loss.


Protein responsible for leukaemia linked to Alzheimer''s disease

 Protein responsible for leukaemia linked to Alzheimer''s diseaseWashington, May 25: The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research scientists have discovered that a molecule c-Abl, which has a known role in leukaemia, also has a hand in Alzheimer''s disease.

The finding offers a new target for drug development that could stave off the pathological disease process.


Lithium slows development of Alzheimer's: Research

AlzheimerLondon, April 28 : A trial of 41 people over 60 years with mild cognitive impairment, a precursor to full-blown Alzheimer's, found that the rate of mental decline was lower in the half given 150 mg of lithium daily, compared to those given a simulated medical intervention.

While all participants showed a decline in memory function and attention tasks over the years, the rate of decline among those on lithium was significantly less.


Tobacco-derived compound prevents memory loss in Alzheimer’s

 Tobacco-derived compound prevents memory loss in Alzheimer’s Washington, April 28: A study led by researchers at Bay Pines VA Healthcare System and the University of South Florida has found that Cotinine, a compound derived from tobacco, reduced plaques associated with dementia and prevented memory loss in a mouse model of Alzheimer''s disease.


People with thin brain structure ‘at greater risk for Alzheimer''s’

Alzheimer's DiseaseWashington, April 14 : Researchers from Rush University Medical Center and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) found that, among individuals in whom specific brain structures were thinnest, the risk of developing Alzheimer''s was three times greater than in those with above-average thickness.


Brain scans may help early detection of Alzheimer''s

 Brain scans may help early detection of Alzheimer''sWashington, Apr 12: A new research suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could help detect Alzheimer''s disease (AD) at an early stage, before irreversible damage has occurred.

With no known treatment to alter its course, AD exacts an enormous toll on society. The Alzheimer''s Association estimates that 5.4 million Americans are living with the disease today.


Study associates herpes to Alzheimer''s disease

Study associates herpes to Alzheimer''s diseaseWashington, April 05: A new technique to observe herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) infections growing inside cells has been developed by laboratories at the University of New Mexico (UNM), Brown University, and House Ear Institute (HEI).

HSV1, the cause of the common cold sore, persists in a latent form inside nerve cells. Re-activation and growth of HSV1 infections contribute to cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer''s disease.


Genetic clues to prevent Alzheimer's discovered

Alzheimer's DiseaseLondon, April 4 : The discovery of five genetic links to Alzheimer's disease potentially opens newer ways of treating the condition.

The discoveries mean a total of 10 genes are now known to play a role in late-onset Alzheimer's -- the most common form of dementia.

Eradicating the effects of all of them would remove 60 percent of the illness in the population, or 300,000 cases in Britain, the journal Nature Genetics reports.


5 more genes behind Alzheimer''s disease risk identified

 5 more genes behind Alzheimer''s disease risk identified London, April 04 : A consortium of Alzheimer''s researchers, including a team from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, has identified five more new genes that when present add to risk of developing Alzheimer''s disease later in life.


Study suggests another avenue for detecting Alzheimer''s

Study suggests another avenue for detecting Alzheimer''sLondon, April 02: A well-known chemical process called acetylation has a previously unrecognized association with one of the biological processes associated with Alzheimer''s disease and related disorders, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have determined.


Here come clues to long-term memory making

AlzheimerWashington, March 21 : You may recall the exact shade of your beloved's eyes for years. But how do you do it? Answer to the question may have a bearing on Alzheimer's, autism and mental retardation.

Duke University Medical Centre researchers have found a cascade of signalling molecules that usually allow a very brief signal to last for tens of minutes.


Potential therapeutic target for Parkinson''s, Alzheimer''s identified

Potential therapeutic target for Parkinson''s, Alzheimer''s identifiedWashington, Mar 12: Scientists have identified a potential therapeutic target to slow changes that lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson''s and Alzheimer''s diseases.

Cell biologists pondering the death of neurons - brain cells - said that by eliminating one ingredient from the cellular machinery, they prolonged the life of neurons stressed by a pesticide chemical.


Mums, not dads, pass on Alzheimer''s risk: Study

 Mums, not dads, pass on Alzheimer''s risk: StudyWashington, Mar 1: A new study has suggested that a person is more likely to inherit Alzheimer''s disease from his/her mother than his/her father.

In general, people who have first-degree relatives with Alzheimer''s disease are four to 10 times more likely to develop the disease than people with no family history of Alzheimer''s disease, according to researchers from the University of Kansas School of Medicine.


How diets high in fish oil fight Alzheimer''s

 How diets high in fish oil fight Alzheimer''sWashington, Feb 16: Scientists have found how diets high in Omega 3 oils and low in cholesterol fight Alzheimer''s.


New finding shows promise in the fight against Alzheimer''s

 New finding shows promise in the fight against Alzheimer''s  Washington, Jan 27 : Scientists have discovered a new target for the prevention of adverse immune responses, which have been identified as factors in the development of Alzheimer''s disease (AD).

The discovery was made by researchers at the University of South Florida''s Department of Psychiatry and the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair.


Brain chemical boosts memory, could treat Alzheimer's

Brain chemical boosts memory, could treat Alzheimer'sLondon, Jan 27 - Scientists have identified a key chemical that boosts memory, potentially opening the way to newer treatments for Alzheimer's.

In a series of experiments, Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers in the US showed that IGF-II plays a key role in memory.

The chemical is found in relatively high levels in the hippocampus, the brain's memory hub. However, levels decline with age, the journal Nature reports.


New skin patch may help people with Alzheimer’s

 New skin patch may help people with Alzheimer’sLondon, Jan 18: A new skin patch may help jog the memory of those with Alzheimer's.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence had banned Aricept (donepezil), Reminyl (galantamine) and Exelon (rivastigmine).

But in a major U-turn, the UK's drug rationing body has agreed to let those in the early stages of the devastating disease have access to three life-boosting drugs.


Link between Down syndrome, Alzheimer''s disease discovered

 Link between Down syndrome, Alzheimer''s disease discovered Washington, Jan 13 : Researchers have discovered that the genetic mechanism which destroys brain cells is responsible for early development of Alzheimer''s Disease in people with Down Syndrome and for development of Alzheimer''s Disease in general population.


Culprit gene behind Alzheimer's identified

Culprit gene behind Alzheimer's identifiedToronto, Jan 13 - There is cheering news for Alzheimer's patients and people with Down's syndrome as Canadian researchers have identified the gene that destroys brain cells in these diseases.


How Alzheimer''s plaques lead to loss of nitric oxide in brain

 How Alzheimer''s plaques lead to loss of nitric oxide in brainWashington, Jan 11: The deadly plaques of Alzheimer''s disease interact with certain cellular proteins to inhibit normal signals that maintain blood flow to the brain, a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has discovered.


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