Health

Mediterranean diet component snatches cancer cell's immortality: Study

Mediterranean diet component snatches cancer cell's immortality: StudyWashington, May 21 : Scientists have found a compound in foods associated with Mediterranean diet that deprives cancer cells of their immortal nature, says a study.

By altering a very specific step in gene regulation, this compound essentially re-educates cancer cells into normal cells that die as scheduled.


Spike in brain activity may deter Alzheimer's

Spike in brain activity may deter Alzheimer'sTel Aviv, April 20 : Short bursts of brain activity may help protect from Alzheimer's, says a study conducted by researchers in Israel.


China briefs WHO on new bird flu

China briefs WHO on new bird fluBeijing, April 4 - China's health authorities have promised transparency and cooperation to the World Health Organisation (WHO) over human infections from a new strain of bird flu.


Pill taken by BP patients could halve dementia risk

Pill taken by BP patients could halve dementia risk London, Mar 6 : A blood pressure pill, which is taken by tens of thousands of patients, could be the key to beating Alzheimer's disease.

British scientists believe that the 3p a day tablet could slow progression of the disease and even combat devastating memory loss, the Daily Express reported.


HIV cure raises hopes tempered with caution

HIV cure raises hopes tempered with cautionWashington, March 6 - The report of an American toddler "functionally cured" of HIV has raised hopes of a breakthrough in the global fight to end the AIDS epidemic, but researchers suggest treating the development with caution.

Calling it "The Intriguing Case of a Baby Cured of HIV", The New York Times editorially said: "There are reasons to treat this apparent breakthrough cautiously."


Simple breath test could help detect stomach cancer

Simple breath test could help detect stomach cancer London, Mar 6 : A quick and simple breath test can diagnose stomach cancer, a new study has revealed.

Scientists from Israel and China found the test was 90 percent accurate at detecting and distinguishing cancers from other stomach complaints in 130 patients.

According to the British Journal of Cancer, the test could revolutionise and speed up the way this cancer is diagnosed, the BBC reported.


New longer-lasting drug could help fight diabetes

New longer-lasting drug could help fight diabetes London, Mar. 5 : A simple once-a-day injection, which last for 40 hours instead of a maximum of 18 hours, could offer hope to millions of diabetics.

The ground-breaking drug - a longer-lasting type of insulin - costs just 2.20-pound-a-day, the Daily Express reported.

In order to keep their problems under control, many diabetic patients inject themselves with insulin several times a day to keep their blood sugar level steady.


7 new genes linked to common cause of blindness in elders

7 new genes linked to common cause of blindness in elders London, March 4 : An international team of investigators has identified seven new genetic regions associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness in older individuals.

The findings could point to new biological pathways and therapeutic targets for AMD, according to the researchers.


Anti-ageing pill may help prevent Alzheimer’s and cancer

Anti-ageing pill may help prevent Alzheimer’s and cancer London, February 25 : Carnosine, which is taken as a dietary supplement, could help protect against a host of diseases from cancer to Alzheimer's disease, scientists have claimed.

The powerful antioxidant tablet is already used in anti-ageing products and by athletes to delay muscle fatigue.


Southampton Varsity identify molecular system that could help develop potential treatment for Alzhei

Southampton Varsity identify molecular system that could help develop potential treatment for Alzhei London, Feb 25 : Scientists from the University of Southampton have identified the molecular system that contributes to the harmful inflammatory reaction in the brain during neurodegenerative diseases.


Eating chips more than once every week raises prostate cancer risk

Eating chips more than once every week raises prostate cancer risk London, Feb. 20 : Men who eat fried foods more than once a week may increase their risk of prostate cancer by a third, a new research has suggested.

According to the research, junk food staples like chips, fried chicken, battered fish and doughnuts could play an important role in the formation of aggressive and life-threatening forms of the disease, the Daily Mail reported.


Hair dyes linked to cancer causing chemicals

Hair dyes linked to cancer causing chemicals London, Feb. 20 : Hair dyes that are being used by millions of women contain chemicals that are linked to cancer, scientists have warned.

They say that both home hair colouring kits and the dyes, which are used at expensive salons pose a potential risk to women's health.

The warning comes from scientists at Leeds-based company Green Chemicals, who conducted a review of the chemistry surrounding hair dye.


Coffee during pregnancy could harm unborn babies

Coffee during pregnancy could harm unborn babies London, February 19 : Pregnant women should avoid drinking coffee because even a single cup of it a day could harm their unborn babies, researchers have warned.

They reported in the journal BMC Medicine that caffeine content is linked to low birth weight and prolonged pregnancies, according to the Daily Express.

The researchers used information about almost 60,000 pregnancies over 10 years.


Researchers model erratic heartbeat in real time

Researchers model erratic heartbeat in real timeToronto, Feb 18 - Using powerful X-rays, researchers have modelled arrhythmia in real time.

Arrhythmia, characterised by the heart beating too fast, too slow or inconsistently, may precipitate a decrease of blood flow to the brain and body, resulting in heart palpitation, dizziness, fainting, or even death. It may be too tiny for a microscope to observe.


Flexible electrodes show promise in Parkinson's

Flexible electrodes show promise in Parkinson'sBerne, Feb 18 - Tiny, ultra-flexible electrodes could be the answer to more successful treatment of Parkinson's, which afflicts an estimated seven to 10 million people worldwide.

Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), currently the standard practice in treating this condition, can involve long, expensive surgeries with dramatic side-effects.


Urbanisation cuts people off adequate sunlight

Urbanisation cuts people off adequate sunlightWashington, Feb 17 - Increasing urbanisation is cutting off people from adequate sunlight, which helps the skin produce vitamin D, facilitating the absorption of calcium, says a study.

About two million years ago, permanent dark skin colour imparted by the pigment -- melanin -- began to evolve in humans to regulate the body's reaction to ultraviolet rays from the sun, said Nina Jablonski, professor of anthropology at Penn State University.


New drug for low-grade ovarian cancer identified

New drug for low-grade ovarian cancer identified London, February 15 : Many women with low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary or peritoneum have seen their tumors stabilize or shrink after taking a regular dose of the compound selumetinib, researchers at the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix have found.


Work stress not linked to cancers, say researchers

Work stress not linked to cancers, say researchersLondon, Feb 11 - Scientists have delinked work-related stress from development of colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancers.

Around 90 percent of cancers are linked to environmental exposures, and while some exposures are well recognised (such as UV radiation and tobacco smoke), others are not (psychological factors such as stress).


Molecule that drives cancer cells to `commit suicide` discovered

Molecule that drives cancer cells to `commit suicide` discovered London, Feb 9 : Scientists have made a key breakthrough by discovering that the body can destroy cancerous tumours itself.

Researchers from Pennsylvania State University have identified a molecule, known as TIC10, which activates a protein that helps fight the disease, the Daily Mail reported.


Work-related stress `not linked to cancer`

Work-related stress `not linked to cancer` London, February 8 : Stress at work is highly unlikely to be a cause of the four most common types of cancer including colorectal, lung, breast and prostate, according to a large international review of previous research.

Around 90 percent of cancers are linked to environmental exposures and whilst some exposures are well recognised (such as UV radiation and tobacco smoke), others are not (psychological factors such as stress).


New purple-tinged spectacles could be answer to colour blindness

New purple-tinged spectacles could be answer to colour blindness London, Feb 8 : Scientists have developed glasses with purple-tinged lenses that enhance reds and greens, allowing those with colour blindness to see them properly.

One tester of the Oxy-Iso lenses, a British academic, has told how he "shivered with excitement" after putting on the 190-pound glasses for the first time.


Eating tomatoes cuts heart disease risk by 26 pc

Eating tomatoes cuts heart disease risk by 26 pc London, Feb. 6 : A new study suggests that regularly eating lycopene - an antioxidant which gives tomatoes their rich red colour - could decrease the risk of heart disease by a quarter.

The scientists at Tufts University in Boston, reached their findings after analysing data gathered over more than a decade to see the effects of lycopene intake on the cardiovascular system, the Daily Mail reported.


Black tea `good for diabetics`

Black tea `good for diabetics` Islamabad, Feb 4 : People who drink black tea are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, according to researchers.

A new analysis of data from 50 countries found that the nations who drank the most black tea also suffered the lowest levels of the metabolic syndrome, the Daily Times reported.

The study also found that high tea consumption was related to lower levels of obesity.


Seafood is latest craze of Kolkata foodies

Seafood is latest craze of Kolkata foodiesKolkata, Jan 29 - Let the nutty flavours of squid meat, the juicy sink-your-teeth-in flesh of prawns, the delicate texture of sweet crab meat and the creamy texture of octopus assail your senses. Fish is no longer the only aquatic offering that will satisfy the palate of the Kolkata foodie.


DNA mapping offers new hope to cancer patients

DNA mapping offers new hope to cancer patients London, Jan 29 : Researchers predict that cancer will become a manageable disease, thanks to a revolutionary treatment which will be available within five years.

All patients will soon have their tumour's DNA, its genetic code, sequenced, enabling doctors to ensure they give exactly the right drugs to keep the disease at bay, the Telegraph reported.


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