New York

Love guzzling diet sodas? Here is why you should NOT

Love guzzling diet sodas? Here is why you should NOTNew York [U.S.], Apr. 24 : Still downing gallons of diet soda despite knowing that it wrecks your body? Maybe the knowledge of artificially sweetened beverages taking a toll on your brain as well ought to make an impact on your unhealthy habit.

Artificially sweetened drinks, such as diet sodas, were tied to a higher risk of stroke and dementia in the study published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke reports CNN.


Americans over 60 booze more: Study

Americans over 60 booze more: StudyNew York [USA], Apr 1 : Nowadays, Americans over 60 tend to booze more than they used to do 20 years ago.

A study, published recently in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, found that regular consumption among older populations is on the rise.


Vitamin B an unlikely weapon in war against pollution

Vitamin B an unlikely weapon in war against pollutionNew York [U.S.], Mar. 15 : In the first study of its kind, a team of international researchers have discovered that something as simple as a daily vitamin B supplement could help mitigate the effects of the most dangerous type of air pollution.


Maternal mortality rates decline worldwide except US

Maternal mortality rates decline worldwide except USNew York [US], Mar. 7 : While the maternal mortality rates are declining worldwide, the situation for women in the United States is a glaring exception.

And in Texas, where clinics serving women have shuttered and their health interests have been battled all the way up to the US Supreme Court, the rate of pregnancy-related deaths more than doubled over the course of two years.


Polluted environment kills 1.7 million children every year: WHO

Polluted environment kills 1.7 million children every year: WHONew York [US], Mar. 6 : A shocking report by World Health Organisation reveals that each year, environmental pollutants cost an estimated 1.7 million lives among children under five.

The causes include unsafe water, lack of sanitation, poor hygiene practices and indoor and outdoor pollution, as well as injuries.


'Straight' women tend to orgasm less!

'Straight' women tend to orgasm less!New York [USA], Feb. 25 : 'Orgasm gap' is something all have experienced while making love.

A report in Fox News now says, a new study offers evidence to the fact that 'straight' women have fewer orgasms than men, or lesbian and bisexual women.


Rotating shifts, heavy lifting may affect women's ability to conceive

Rotating shifts, heavy lifting may affect women's ability to conceiveNew York [USA], Feb. 8 : It is indeed an alert for all those women, who work recklessly in private sectors!

A CNN report says that a study has found that night or irregular shifts may reduce their fertility.


Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic painNew York, Jan.31 : Ever twisted an ankle or injured your foot and never thought of taking a second opinion after your doc prescribed you painkillers? Well give a second thought, now.

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.


You earn extra 4 kg along with a college degree

You earn extra 4 kg along with a college degreeNew York, Dec 12 : Completing a four-year degree course is likely to add more than 4.5 kgs to your body weight, along with the associated health risks, a study says.

"Our study shows that there is concerning weight gain among college students that happens over all four years they are in college," said the study's lead author Lizzy Pope, Assistant Professor at University of Vermont in the US.


Running is actually good for knee joints: Study

Running is actually good for knee joints: StudyNew York, Dec 11 : Contrary to popular perception, running actually reduces inflammation in knee joints and slows the process that leads to osteoarthritis, a study said.

"This idea that long-distance running is bad for your knees might be a myth," said study co-author Matt Seeley, Associate Professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Utah, US.


Eating dark chocolates may improve your heart health

Eating dark chocolates may improve your heart healthNew York : Now you need not be guilty of indulging in dark chocolates, as compounds found in cocoa may be good for your heart, a study has found.

The findings showed that consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa products was associated with improvements in specific circulating biomarkers of cardiometabolic health.


New technique to prevent burn scars

New technique to prevent burn scars New York, Aug 9 : Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to prevent scarring caused by burn injuries.

"People don't die from scars, but they do suffer from them," said lead researcher Alexander Golberg from Tel Aviv University in Israel.

"We believe that the technology we developed, called partial irreversible electroporation (pIRE), can be used to prevent debilitating burn scars from forming," Golberg noted.


Secret to happy marriage is a good night's sleep

Secret to happy marriage is a good night's sleep New York, Aug 8 : If you wish to give your marriage a smooth ride, make sure both of you get sound sleep every night. A new study has found that a good night's sleep can buffer the effects of negative events on a couple's general satisfaction with their marriages.

When husbands and wives get more sleep than on an average night, they are more satisfied with their marriages, at least the following day, the findings showed.


Eat nuts to reduce inflammation

Eat nuts to reduce inflammation New York, July 30 : In a study of more than 5,000 people, researchers have found that greater nuts consumption is associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, a finding that may help explain the health benefits of nuts.

Five or more servings of nuts per week or substituting nuts for animal proteins tied to a healthy profile of inflammatory biomarkers, the findings showed.


Physical strength declines early as we grow old

Physical strength declines early as we grow old New York, July 24 : Physical strength begins to decline sooner in life than typically detected, often when people are still in their 50s, according to a study.

It suggested that efforts to maintain basic strength and endurance should begin before age 50, when it's still possible to preserve the skills that keep people mobile and independent later in life.


Brisk walk boosts memory in breast cancer survivors

Brisk walk boosts memory in breast cancer survivors New York, July 9 : Moderate-to-vigorous physical activities -- such as brisk walking or jogging -- may help improve memory in breast cancer survivors, a new study suggests.
Physical activity alleviates stress and benefits women psychologically, which in turn aids their memory, the study said.

Memory problems appear to be related to the high stress load cancer survivors experience and may not be specific to chemotherapy or radiation treatments.


Why smoking puts you at increase risk of oral diseases

Why smoking puts you at increase risk of oral diseases New York, June 1 : Puffing cigarettes can increase the likelihood that certain bacteria will not only set up camp but will build a fortified city in the mouth and fight against the immune system, thereby making you vulnerable to oral diseases, new research suggests.

Bacteria can form biofilms on most surfaces including teeth, heart valves and the respiratory tract.


Breastfeeding may lower ear infection risk in babies

Breastfeeding may lower ear infection risk in babies New York, May 25 : Feeding at the breast may be healthier than feeding pumped milk from a bottle for reducing the risk of ear infection in babies, says a study.

The researchers also found that feeding breast milk compared with formula may reduce the risk of diarrhoea in the first 12 months of life.

A total of 491 mothers completed surveys as part of the study published in the Journal of Pediatrics.


Wear sunglasses to avoid eye damage

Wear sunglasses to avoid eye damage New York, May 4 : Are you suffering from irritation in the eyes? Wear sunglasses to protect your vision from the sun's ultraviolet rays as overexposure to these harmful rays without the right eye protection can result in dangerous health consequences.


One-two cup of coffee daily may cut colorectal cancer risk

One-two cup of coffee daily may cut colorectal cancer risk New York, April 1 : Drinking black, decaf or even instant coffee daily can lower the risk of developing colorectal cancer, finds a study.

Moderate coffee consumption, between one to two servings a day, was associated with a 26 percent reduction in the odds of developing colorectal cancer after adjusting for known risk factors.


Painful periods may spell higher risk of heart attack

Painful periods may spell higher risk of heart attack New York, March 30 : Young women with heavy and painful periods due to a disorder called endometriosis -- abnormal growth of uterine tissue -- are three times as likely to develop heart attack compared to those without the disorder, says a study.

In endometriosis -- which is also associated with infertility -- tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus grows outside of it.


Gut bacteria may help prevent stroke: Study

Gut bacteria may help prevent stroke: Study New York: Certain types of bacteria in the gut can leverage the immune system to decrease the severity of stroke, according to a new study that suggests modifying the gut's microbiotic makeup may help prevent the deadly condition.

The finding can help mitigate stroke, the second leading cause of death worldwide, researchers said.


Breastfeeding, vaccinations cut ear infections in babies

Breastfeeding, vaccinations cut ear infections in babies New York, March 28 : Higher rates of breastfeeding, use of vaccinations and lower rates of smoking by mothers have reduced the rates of ear infections during the first year of a baby, finds a new study.

"Prolonged breastfeeding was associated with significant reductions in both colds and ear infections, which is a common complication of the cold," said lead researcher Tasnee Chonmaitree, professor at University of Texas in US.


Blood test to predict your risk of developing TB

Blood test to predict your risk of developing TB New York: An international team of researchers has identified biological markers in the blood that can help doctors predict who is at high risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB).

One-third of the world's population is thought to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, but just a small fraction ever develops symptomatic illness.


Education may not cut obese women's risk of depression

Education may not cut obese women's risk of depression New York: Even highly educated obese women have double the risk of depression compared with women of normal weight and same educational attainment, finds a new study.

"Previous research has shown an association of depression and obesity with low education, but we're showing it also exists with women who have higher education as well," said lead study author Ashley Kranjac from the Rice University in Houston, US.


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