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Flu vaccine may cut risk of heart disease and death

Flu vaccine may cut risk of heart disease and deathWashington, October 29 : Getting a flu shot this season may not only lower your risk of influenza, but it may also help protect against heart disease, according to a new review.


Culprit behind high cholesterol identified

Culprit behind high cholesterol identifiedWashington, October 29 : Canadian scientists have discovered that a protein called resistin, secreted by fat tissue, causes high levels of "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein or LDL), increasing the risk of heart disease.


Tips to prevent `winter itch` revealed

winter-itch.Washington, October 28 (ANI): A dermatologist from Columbia University has suggested ten tips to stop winter from weathering your skin.

Cold weather, with its low relative humidity, wreaks havoc on our skin, making it dry and flaky. Skin dries out if it’s deprived of moisture and this dryness often aggravates itchiness, resulting in a condition commonly referred to as “winter itch.”


How to combat winter allergies

Washington, October 28 : Winter months can be brutal for people sensitive to mold spores and dust mites, but help is at hand.

Dr. William Reisacher, director of The Allergy Center in the Department of Otolaryngology (head and neck surgery) at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and Dr. Rachel Miller, director of allergy and immunology at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital, have offered ten simple tricks to keep mold and dust mites at bay and make the winter months more bearable for indoor allergy sufferers:


First mouse model of typhoid fever created

Washington, October 28 : Researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) including Indian origin scientists have developed the first true mouse model of typhoid infection.

The development promises to advance the study of typhoid and the creation of new vaccines against the infection, which remains a major health threat in developing countries.


How the brain and body communicate to regulate weight

How the brain and body communicate to regulate weightWashington, October 27 : In a new study, researchers have provided new insights into how our brains and bodies are wired to work together to maintain a healthy body weight.

To achieve a phenomenon known as energy balance, a tight matching between the number of calories consumed versus those expended.


Diabetes ups protein level linked to Alzheimer’s-related ageing symptoms

Diabetes ups protein level linked to Alzheimer’s-related ageing symptomsWashington, October 27 : In a new study, researchers have shown for the first time that diabetes enhances the development of aging features that may underlie early pathological events in Alzheimer’s.


Indian mung bean could help protect against sepsis

Indian mung bean could help protect against sepsisWashington, October 27 : A bean native to India and commonly used in Chinese food and traditional medicine, has been found to be an effective weapon against the life-threatening condition sepsis.

Researchers at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research found that a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) protein, HMGB1, mediates inflammation.


Eye drops to combat blindness `may help cure baldness

Eye drops to combat blindness `may help cure baldnessWashington, October 27 : In a new study, researchers have shown how a commonly prescribed glaucoma drug may be effective in treating male pattern baldness and other forms of alopecia.

The FDA-approved glaucoma drug, bimatoprost, causes human hair to re-grow and has been commercially available as a way to lengthen eyelashes, but these data are the first to show that it can actually grow human hair from the scalp.


Depression risk `largely tied to life satisfaction`

Depression risk `largely tied to life satisfaction`Washington, October 26 : Vulnerability to major depression is determined by how satisfied we are with our lives - and this relationship can be largely attributed to genes, researchers have suggested.

This is the main finding of a new twin study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in collaboration with the University of Oslo.


‘Bad news’ gene loses its punch when you hit 90s

‘Bad news’ gene loses its punch when you hit 90sWashington, October 26 : A gene linked to the risk of developing Alzheimer''s, heart disease and diabetes becomes less important to quality of life once people reach their 90s, a Mayo Clinic study shows.

At that point, good friends and a positive attitude have a bigger impact, the researchers say.


Gene linked to old age hearing loss discovered

age-related-hearinWashington, October 26 : US researchers have identified a genetic biomarker for age-related hearing loss, a major breakthrough in understanding and preventing a condition of aging that millions of people and greatly diminishes their quality of life.


Airport scanner can damage diabetes device

Airport scanner can damage diabetes deviceWashington, Oct 26 : Full-body scanners used at airports can damage the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device used by diabetics, caution experts.

The risk to these sensitive devices posed by scanners and the low-pressure conditions on airplanes were the focus of a report published in the journal Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.


'Exercise can improve satisfaction levels among youth

'Exercise can improve satisfaction levels among youthWashington, Oct 26 : Extending the normal exercise routine by a few minutes could ensure higher satisfaction levels among young adults aged 18-25 years, says a new study.

"We found that people's satisfaction with life was directly impacted by their daily physical activity," said study author Jaclyn Maher, graduate student in kinesiology at the Penn State University.


Astronauts experience low BP after landing

Astronauts experience low BP after landingWashington, Oct 26: When astronauts land on earth, their blood pressure (BP), along with the altitude, drops in a condition known as orthostatic hypotension, according to a research.

The condition occurs in up to half of those astronauts on short-term missions (two weeks or less) and in nearly all astronauts after long-term missions (four to six months).


Scientists reveal why lost weight bounces back

Scientists reveal why lost weight bounces backWashington, Oct 25 : The longer a mouse remains overweight, the more "irreversible" obesity becomes, says a new study.

"Somewhere along the way, if obesity is allowed to continue, the body appears to flip a switch that re-programmes to a heavier set weight," said Malcolm J. Low, professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the University of Michigan and senior study author.


Moderate drinking risky for brain cells

Moderate drinking risky for brain cellsWashington, Oct 25 - A couple of glasses of wine daily may be a good way to promote cardiovascular and brain health, but it also comes with a hidden risk - lowering brain cell production by 40 percent, new research says.


Diabetes drug could be effective in treating cocaine addiction

Diabetes drug could be effective in treating cocaine addictionWashington, October 24 : A drug currently used to treat type 2 diabetes could be just as effective in treating addiction to drugs, including cocaine, Vanderbilt researchers have revealed.

The findings could have far-reaching implications for patients worldwide who suffer from addiction.


2 paths used by Dengue virus to penetrate cells identified

2 paths used by Dengue virus to penetrate cells identifiedWashington, October 24 : Researchers have discovered two new cell receptors used by Dengue virus to penetrate target cells.

By demonstrating that it is possible to inhibit the viral infection in vitro by blocking the bonding between the virus and these receptors, the researchers have opened the way to a new antiviral strategy.


Perfect pitch may be in your genes

Perfect pitch may be in your genesWashington, October 24 : People with perfect pitch seem to possess their own inner pitch pipe, allowing them to sing a specific note without first hearing a reference tone.

This skill has long been associated with early and extensive musical training, but a new research has suggested that perfect pitch may have as much to do with genetics as it does with learning an instrument or studying voice.


Family history of schizophrenia linked to autism risk

Family history of schizophrenia linked to autism riskWashington, October 24 : Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) probably shares a root cause with other mental illnesses, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, according to a new research.

ASD, a category that includes autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder, are characterized by difficulty with social interaction and communication, or repetitive behaviors.


Doubts cast over moderate alcohol consumption link to breast cancer risk

Doubts cast over moderate alcohol consumption link to breast cancer riskWashington, October 24 : A review paper by two scientists at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the USA has described the epidemiologic and basic scientific evidence linking alcohol consumption to the risk of breast cancer.


Next-generation vaccines may eliminate pain of injection

Next-generation vaccines may eliminate pain of injectionWashington, October 24 : New vaccines being developed by scientists from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway may eliminate the need for needles as they can be delivered via a nasal spray, or as on oral liquid or capsule.

Lead scientist Professor Simon Cutting, from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, has developed the jabs through the use of probiotic spores.


Non-surgical ways to look better in 7 days

Non-surgical ways to look better in 7 daysWashington, October 24 : A professional doctor has come up with an at-home, self-improvement guide on how to get thinner, look younger, sleep better and more.

Dr. Andrew Ordon’s ‘Better in 7’ details a guideline that people can follow in just a week, which outlines everything from an easy-to-follow diet and clever do-it-yourself remedies.

“The diet part, it’s easy to do,” Fox News quoted Ordon as saying.


Babies born during summer `less likely to be CEOs`

Babies born during summer `less likely to be CEOs`Washington, October 24 : A person’s date of birth can affect their climb up the corporate ladder, researchers say.

The study by Sauder School of Business researchers at the University of British Columbia shows that only 6.13 percent of an S and P 500 CEO sample was born in June and only 5.87 percent of the sample was born in July.

By comparison, people born in March and April represented 12.53 percent and 10.67 percent of the sample of CEOs.


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