Washington

Century-old drug approved for sleeping sickness may help treat autism: Study

Century-old drug approved for sleeping sickness may help treat autism: StudyWashington, June 18 - A new study has revealed that a well-known drug that was first synthesized in 1916 and used to treat African sleeping sickness can reverse autism-like symptoms in mice and it might help humans eventually.


Deadly bird flu H7N9 at risk of spreading from China to India, Bangladesh

Bird FluWashington, June 18 - A new research suggests that a dangerous strain of avian influenza, H7N9, that's causing severe illness and deaths in China may be inhabiting a small fraction of its potential range and appears at risk of spreading to other suitable areas of India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines.


'Walkable' neighborhoods reduce obesity, diabetes risk

'Walkable' neighborhoods reduce obesity, diabetes riskWashington, June 18 - New studies suggest that people who live in neighborhoods that are conducive to walking experienced a substantially lower rate of obesity, overweight and diabetes than those who lived in more auto-dependent neighborhoods.


Improving sleep patterns could help lower cognitive decline in older adults

Improving sleep patterns could help lower cognitive decline in older adultsWashington, June 17 - A new University of Oregon-led study of middle-aged or older people has found that those who get six to nine hours of sleep a night think better than those sleeping fewer or more hours.


Adolescents' brains process sugar differently than adults': Study

Adolescents' brains process sugar differently than adults': StudyWashington, June 16 : A new study has revealed that adolescent brains process sugar differently than adult brains.

According to the study by researchers at the Yale School of Medicine, in adolescents, glucose increased the blood flow in the regions of the brain implicated in reward-motivation and decision-making, whereas in adults, it decreased the blood flow in these regions.


Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice could help treat humans in future

Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice could help treat humans in futureWashington, June 15 : A new study has revealed that a therapy that reverses new onset Type 1 diabetes in mouse could eventually help humans in fighting the disease.

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and affects about 5 percent of all people with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. There is no cure, though it can be controlled with insulin therapy.


Fasting can reduce cholesterol levels in prediabetic patients

Fasting can reduce cholesterol levels in prediabetic patientsWashington, June 15 - A new research on periodic fasting has identified a biological process in the body that converts bad cholesterol in fat cells to energy, thus combating diabetes risk factors.


Information on packaged food creates false sense of health

Information on packaged food creates false sense of healthWashington, June 14 : A new research has revealed that facts printed on the packaged food create false sense of health that might be contributing to the obesity outbreak in the United States.

Temple Northup, an assistant professor at the Jack J. Valenti School of Communication at UH said that food marketers are exploiting consumer desires to be healthy by marketing products as nutritious when, in fact, they're not.


Text messages can be helpful in controlling diabetes

Text messages can be helpful in controlling diabetesWashington, June 14 : A new study has revealed that mobile phones played a significant role in improving the glycemic control in high risk Latinos with type 2 diabetes.

Athena Philis-Tsimikas, M. D said that the use of mobile phones in health care is very promising, especially when it comes to low-income populations with chronic diseases.


New drug target for Alzheimer's disease found

New drug target for Alzheimer's disease foundWashington, June 14 : Scientists have discovered a new drug that targets Alzheimer's disease and has potential for development as a novel diagnostic tool.

According to the research team led by Gong Chen, a Professor of Biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State University, an abnormally high concentration of one inhibitory neurotransmitter was discovered in the brains of deceased Alzheimer's patients.


Copper compound could help treat Lou Gehrig's disease

Copper compound could help treat Lou Gehrig's diseaseWashington, June 14 - Researchers have determined that a copper compound known for decades may form the basis for a therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease.


Good people do bad things when in groups: Study

Good people do bad things when in groups: StudyWashington, June 14 - A new research has revealed that people tend to do bad things and lose touch with their personal moral beliefs when they are in groups.

When people get together in groups, unusual things can happen, both good and bad. Groups create important social institutions that an individual could not achieve alone but there can be a darker side to such alliances.


Female hormones blamed for obesity in western men

Female hormones blamed for obesity in western menWashington, June 14 - Obesity among Western men could be linked with exposure to substances containing the female sex hormone estrogen according to new research from the University of Adelaide.

Medical student James Grantham, who conducted the research compared the obesity rates among men and women from around the world with measures such as Gross Domestic Product to determine the impact of affluence on obesity.


Playing football can lower blood pressure, improve heart function in diabetes patients

Playing football can lower blood pressure, improve heart function in diabetes patientsWashington, June 13 - New studies suggest that football training produces significant changes in body composition and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, and effectively lowers blood pressure in men with high blood pressure.

The studies were carried out by the Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health at the University of Copenhagen.


Diet high in protein lowers stroke risk

Diet high in protein lowers stroke riskWashington, June 12 - A new study suggests that people with diets higher in protein, especially from fish, may be less likely to have a stroke than those with diets lower in protein.

"The amount of protein that led to the reduced risk was moderate-equal to 20 grams per day," study author Xinfeng Liu, MD, PhD, of Nanjing University School of Medicine in Nanjing, China said.


Authoritarian parents up risk of drug use in adolescents

Authoritarian parents up risk of drug use in adolescentsWashington, June 12 - A new study suggests that having authoritarian parents increases the risk of drug use in adolescents.

Alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use is very widespread among youths in Spain compared to the majority of European countries, according to the latest data from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction.


It's the last bite that matters!

It's the last bite that matters!Washington, June 12 - A new study has revealed that the last bite of food rather than the first bite plays an important role in influencing the memory of people and determining when they have the craving to eat more be.

The memory of people for food is often vivid, especially when they experience food that are terrifyingly bad or delightfully good.


'Trust hormone' oxytocin helps repair old muscles

'Trust hormone' oxytocin helps repair old musclesWashington, June 11 : Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have discovered that oxytocin-a hormone associated with maternal nurturing, social attachments, childbirth and sex-is indispensable for healthy muscle maintenance and repair.

The new study presents oxytocin as the latest treatment target for age-related muscle wasting, or sarcopenia.


Eating oatmeal can help you feel full longer: Study

Eating oatmeal can help you feel full longer: StudyWashington, June 11 : A new research has revealed that eating one bowl of instant oatmeal for breakfast helps to manage hunger better than the same amount of leading oat-based cereal.

The statistically significant results established that instant oatmeal enhanced satiety, feelings of fullness and reduced the desire to eat more than a RTE, oat-based cereal.


Higher intake of red meat ups breast cancer risk

Higher intake of red meat ups breast cancer riskWashington, June 11 - Studies have so far suggested no significant association between red meat intake and breast cancer.

However, most have been based on diet during midlife and later, and many lines of evidence suggest that some exposures, potentially including dietary factors, may have greater effects on the development of breast cancer during early adulthood.


Chocolate set to get tastier

Chocolate set to get tastierWashington, June 11 - Scientists are seeking ways to improve chocolate, and enhance the world's pleasure.

A team of researchers from Germany and Switzerland-the heartland of fine chocolate-have embarked upon a quest to better understand natural cocoa fermentation.


REM sleep disorder a sign of impending neurodegenerative disease

REM sleep disorder a sign of impending neurodegenerative diseaseWashington, June 10 - The sleep disorder in particular, called REM behavior disorder, could be a sign of impending neurodegenerative disease, including Parkinson's and dementia, scientists have claimed.


Scientists come closer to linking 'Jekyll and Hyde' protein with type 1 diabetes

Scientists come closer to linking 'Jekyll and Hyde' protein with type 1 diabetesWashington, June 10 - Researchers have shown how a protein, called GAD65, changes its shape when it turns itself on and off and said that this characteristic could also link it to type 1 diabetes.

In the human brain, GAD65 performs an essential role: it makes 'neurotransmitters' - chemicals that pass messages between brain cells.


Statins lower physical activity in older men: Study

Statins lower physical activity in older men: StudyWashington, June 10 - Muscle pain, fatigue, and weakness are common side effects in patients prescribed statins, according to a new study.

The study suggests that physical activity is important for older adults to remain healthy.


Adequate sleep for both parents and kids important in curbing child obesity

Adequate sleep for both parents and kids important in curbing child obesityWashington, June 10 - A new study has revealed that parents should encourage proper sleeping routines for kids as well as for themselves, as it can help decrease child obesity.


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