Washington

Infant's pain alters response to anxiety and stress later in life

Infant's pain alters response to anxiety and stress later in lifeWashington, Oct 31 - Pain experienced by infants who often do not receive analgesics while undergoing tests and treatment in neonatal intensive care may permanently alter future responses to anxiety, stress and pain in adulthood, as early life pain alters neural circuits in the brain that regulate stress, a new study has revealed.


Why it's healthier to give vent to your feelings

Why it's healthier to give vent to your feelings Washington, Oct. 29 - A new research has suggested that a common emotion regulation strategy called "cognitive reappraisal" may actually be harmful when it comes to stressors that are under our control.

Psychological scientist and lead researcher Allison Troy of Franklin and Marshall College and colleagues discovered that the controllability of a given situation seems to be the key in determining whether cognitive reappraisal helps or hurts.


Running in high-heels may lead to knee problems later in life

Running in high-heels may lead to knee problems later in lifeWashington, Oct 29 - A new study has said that if you run a lot in high-heeled footwear you could be storing up knee problems for later in life.

9 out of 10 wearers of high-heels report associated soreness, fatigue, numbness and bunions when wearing such footwear.


AIIMS researchers prove yoga's benefits for COPD patients

AIIMS researchers prove yoga's benefits for COPD patients Washington, Oct 29 - COPD patients can improve their lung function by practicing yoga, a new research led by Indian origin scientist has revealed.

The study by researchers at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders found that lung function, shortness of breath, and inflammation all showed significant improvement after patients completed 12 weeks of training.


Why there's no cure for common cold yet

ColdWashington, Oct 29 - Scientists have constructed a three-dimensional model of the pathogen that shows why there is no cure yet for the common cold.

A team led by biochemistry Professor Ann Palmenberg from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides a meticulous topographical model of the capsid or protein shell of a cold virus that until 2006 was unknown to science.


Brown fat cells govern daily control of body temperature

Brown fat cells govern daily control of body temperatureWashington, Oct. 28 - Researchers have tried to explain how body temperature rhythms are synchronized while maintaining the ability to adapt to changes in environmental temperature no matter the time of day or night.


11 new Alzheimer's genes to target for drug discovered

11 new Alzheimer's genes to target for drug discovered Washington, Oct 28 - Researchers have identified 11 new regions of the genome that contribute to late-onset Alzheimer's disease, doubling the number of potential genetics-based therapeutic targets to investigate.

In 2011, the world's four largest research consortia on the genetics of Alzheimer's disease joined efforts to discover and map the genes that contribute to Alzheimer's, forming the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP).


Antibody fragment that fights Alzheimer's disease in mice developed

Antibody fragment that fights Alzheimer's disease in mice developedWashington, Oct 28 - Researchers have conducted trials with mice by injecting a specific antibody fragment against soluble aggregates of the A peptide, responsible for the toxicity and cell death characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

The beneficial effects were seen at the behavioural, cellular and molecular levels five days after an intraperitoneal dose was administered.


Theatre could help autistic youth improve social deficits

Theatre could help autistic youth improve social deficitsWashington, Oct. 27 - A novel autism intervention program is using theatre to teach reciprocal communication skills to improve social deficits in adolescents with the disorder, a new study has revealed.


'Disease in a dish' model helps make Lou Gehrig's disease history

'Disease in a dish' model helps make Lou Gehrig's disease historyWashington, Oct. 27 - A team of doctors and scientists used an innovative stem cell technique to create neurons in a lab dish from skin scrapings of patients who have Lou Gehrig's disease.


Users warned against wearing novelty contact lenses during Halloween

Users warned against wearing novelty contact lenses during HalloweenWashington, Oct 26 - The spooky or quirky contact lenses which are worn during Halloween could cause serious health issues if improperly sized or cleaned, according to an Indian origin ophthalmologist.

Cosmetic, or decorative, contact lenses are commonly used throughout the year to change someone's natural eye color, but the popularity of these lenses soar at Halloween.


Soon, nano-particles to assassinate tumour cells

Soon, nano-particles to assassinate tumour cellsWashington, Oct. 26 - A new technique will feature nanoparticle-encapsulated substances that could kill off tumour cells selectively.

Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research (IAP) in Potsdam, Germany, decided to use hydrophobic, water-insoluble lipid vesicles as the tiny, 200-250 nanometer pharmaceutical carriers.

They are biologically degradable and disintegrate in the body after deployment.


Plant sterols may prevent onset of Alzheimer's disease

Plant sterols may prevent onset of Alzheimer's disease Washington, Oct 25 - High cholesterol levels have long been discussed to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, but now researchers have demonstrated preventive effect of sterols in the disease.


How sleep loss adversely affects immune system

How sleep loss adversely affects immune systemWashington, Oct. 24 - Researchers have identified the genes that are most susceptible to sleep deprivation and are examining if these genes are involved in the regulation of the immune system.

Conducted at the sleep laboratory of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, the study restricted the amount of sleep of a group of healthy young men to four hours per night for five days, imitating the schedule of a normal working week.


Common food preservative can prevent spread of deadly H7N9 bird flu

Common food preservative can prevent spread of deadly H7N9 bird fluWashington, Oct 24 - A new research has suggested that a common food additive can block a deadly new strain of avian influenza virus from infecting healthy cells.

The compound, in wide use as a preservative, binds to a part of the flu virus that has never been targeted by any existing antiviral drug, raising hopes for its effectiveness against multi-drug-resistant flu viruses.


How brain helps to resist temptation revealed

How brain helps to resist temptation revealedWashington, Oct. 23 - A new study has found that the brain's memory systems help in resisting temptations.

Using paradigms like 10 dollars now, versus 11 dollars tomorrow, scientists found that the dorsolateral part of the prefrontal cortex, a region known to implement behavioral control, was crucial for making the choice to wait for higher but delayed payoffs.


Flu vaccine halves risk of heart attack in vulnerable patients

Flu vaccine halves risk of heart attack in vulnerable patients Washington, Oct 23 - A new study has revealed that flu vaccine may help to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke by more than
50 percent among those who have a heart attack history.


Drinking 3 cups of coffee a day reduces liver cancer risk by over 50pc

Drinking 3 cups of coffee a day reduces liver cancer risk by over 50pcWashington, Oct 23 - A new study has revealed that coffee consumption can reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is the most common type of liver cancer, by about 40 percent.

The research also indicated that three cups of coffee per day reduces liver cancer risk by more than 50 percent.


Long-term obesity linked to poorer pancreatic cancer survival

Long-term obesity linked to poorer pancreatic cancer survivalWashington, Oct 22 - A new study has shown that obese adults live on average two to three months less after a pancreatic cancer diagnosis, compared with healthy weight patients, even after adjusting for factors that are known to predict survival for patients with this disease, such as age and disease stage.

This association was statistically strongest for people who were overweight two decades before their diagnosis.


Learning only mentally demanding skills helps keep aging mind sharp

Learning only mentally demanding skills helps keep aging mind sharpWashington, Oct. 22 - A new research has shown that learning only certain activities, such as photography, may help elderly improve their cognitive functioning.

These findings reveal that less demanding activities, such as listening to classical music or completing word puzzles, probably won't bring noticeable benefits to an aging mind .


Binge drinking linked to increased stroke risk in middle-aged men

Binge drinking linked to increased stroke risk in middle-aged menWashington, Oct 22 - A new study has showed that excessive alcohol consumption increases the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of stroke in middle-aged men.

The Finnish population-based research found that progression of atherosclerosis was increased among men who consumed 6 drinks or more on one occasion. In addition, the risk of stroke increased among men who had at least one hangover per year.


Poor sleep quality may trigger Alzheimer's disease onset and progression

Poor sleep quality may trigger Alzheimer's disease onset and progressionWashington, Oct 22 - A new study has revealed that shorter sleep duration and lower sleep quality are both associated with onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease in adults.


Low levels of vitamin D raise anemia risk in kids

vitamins DWashington, Oct 22 - A new study has revealed that low levels of vitamin D may increase a child's risk of anemia.

Investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Centre caution that their results are not proof of cause and effect, but rather evidence of a complex interplay between low vitamin D levels and haemoglobin.


Community-based weight loss intervention better than self-help approach

Community-based weight loss intervention better than self-help approachWashington, Oct 21 - A new randomized controlled trial has found that overweight and obese adults following a community-based weight loss intervention, namely Weight Watchers, lost more weight than people who tried to lose weight on their own.


New protein that guides and stimulates blood vessel formation identified

New protein that guides and stimulates blood vessel formation identifiedWashington, Oct 21 - Researchers have identified a protein that is expressed by human bone marrow stem cells that helps guide and stimulate the formation of blood vessels.

Their findings, which could help improve the vascularization of engineered tissues, were reported online on October 12 in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology.


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