Washington

Now, headband that could make migraines history

Now, headband that could make migraines historyWashington, Mar 12 : The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a nerve-stimulating headband as the first medical device to prevent migraine headaches.

Agency officials said that the device provides a new option for patients who cannot tolerate migraine medications.


Feeling sad stops you from indulging in unhealthy foods

Feeling sad stops you from indulging in unhealthy foodsWashington, March 12 : Are you a fast food or chocolate lover who does not mind eating an extra one if offered? The best way to avoid the instant gratification is to become sad about such food products.

According to a study, combating this type of self-destructive behaviour may be achieved simply by making a person feel sad.


Obesity linked to low academic scores among teen girls

ObesityWashington, Mar 12 : A new study has shown that obesity in adolescent girls is linked to lower academic attainment levels throughout their teenage years.

The research conducted by the Universities of Strathclyde, Dundee, Georgia and Bristol is the most comprehensive study yet carried out into the association between obesity and academic attainment in adolescence.


Nicotine patches do not help pregnant smokers to kick the butt

Nicotine patchesWashington, Mar 12 : Guidelines suggest adding nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) to behavioural smoking cessation support in pregnant smokers because of their excellent safety profile and proved effectiveness in other groups of smokers.

However, there is a lack of good quality evidence on the effectiveness of NRT in pregnant smokers.


High protein diet may help prevent functional decline in elderly

High protein dietWashington, March 12 : Researchers have suggested that a diet high in protein, particularly animal protein, may help elderly individuals maintain a higher level of physical, psychological, and social function.


Eating excessive chocolate when sad can make you gain weight and have low self-esteem

chocolateWashington, Mar 12 - A new study suggests that the instant gratification and the pleasure derived from consuming excessive chocolate and deep-fried foods can lead to a double-edged sword of negative consequences ranging from weight gain to feelings of low self-esteem.

According to the study, combating this type of self-destructive behavior may be achieved simply by making a person feel sad.


Healthy diet reduces preterm delivery risk

Healthy diet reduces preterm delivery riskWashington, Mar 11 : A diet based on fruits and vegetables, whole grain products and some types of fish seems to reduce the risk of preterm delivery, a new study has revealed.


Smokers' brains biased against negative images related to smoking: Study

Smokers' brains biased against negative images related to smoking: StudyWashington, March 11 : A new study has revealed that chronic smokers have altered emotional reactions when they are exposed to negative and positive images associated with tobacco.


Healthy diet during midlife lowers dementia risk later in life

Healthy diet during midlife lowers dementia risk later in lifeWashington, Mar 11 - A new study suggests that healthy dietary choices in midlife may prevent dementia in later years.

The results showed that those who ate the healthiest diet at the average age of 50 had an almost 90 percent lower risk of dementia in a 14-year follow-up study than those whose diet was the least healthy.


Mothers in rural India with better peer network save kids from malnutrition

Mothers in rural India with better peer network save kids from malnutritionWashington, Mar 11 - A new study from University of Illinois study found that mothers in rural India who participated in a program designed to educate and empower women, gained a network of peers that led to increased bargaining strength in the home, and significantly improved their children's consumption of rice and dairy.


Simple blood test can predict Alzheimer's

Simple blood test can predict Alzheimer'sWashington, March 10 : A simple blood test has the potential to predict whether a healthy person would develop symptoms of dementia within two or three years, a promising research shows.

The test could fill a major gap in strategies to combat brain degeneration which is thought to show symptoms only at a stage when it too late to treat effectively.


New stem cell transplant holds promise for treatment of degenerative disc disease

New stem cell transplant holds promise for treatment of degenerative disc diseaseWashington, March 10 : Researchers have said that recent development in stem cell research could help treat degenerative disc disease.


How antibiotic resistance spreads among bacteria

How antibiotic resistance spreads among bacteriaWashington, March 10 - Researchers have uncovered the system that allows the sharing of genetic material between bacteria - and therefore the spread of antibiotic resistance.

The study by researchers at Birkbeck, University of London and UCL revealed the mechanism of bacterial type IV secretion, which bacteria use to move substances across their cell wall.


There's little difference between men and women's brains: Neuroscientist

There's little difference between men and women's brains: NeuroscientistWashington, March 9 - A Neuroscientist has claimed that the notion that men and women have different brain structures is merely a myth.

According the Telegraph, in a speech at ScienceGrrls's 'Fighting the Neurotrash' talk at the Women of the World Festival on Saturday, Neuroscientist Professor Gina Rippon, of Aston University Birmingham, said that that gender differences are environmental and not innate.


Lung regeneration comes closer to reality

Lung regeneration comes closer to realityWashington, March 9 : Researchers have now reported their development of new methods and techniques for engineering lungs for patients with COPD and pulmonary fibrosis.


New antibiotic holds promise against deadly bacteria

deadly bacteriaWashington, March 8 : At a time when drug-resistant bacteria are threatening public health worldwide, a team of researchers has discovered a new class of antibiotics to fight a deadly strain of bacteria.

The new class, called oxadiazoles, was discovered in silico (via computer) screening and has shown promise in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria in infected mouse.


Inherited Alzheimer's neuronal damage begins 10 to 20 years before symptoms appear

Inherited Alzheimer's neuronal damage begins 10 to 20 years before symptoms appearWashington, Mar 8 - A study investigating an inherited form of Alzheimer's has found that the progression of the disease may slow once symptoms appear and do significant damage.


Culprit behind gynecological condition endometriosis revealed

Culprit behind gynecological condition endometriosis revealedWashington, March 8 - Researchers have suggested that changes to two previously unstudied genes are the centerpiece of a new theory regarding the cause and development of endometriosis.

The discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists suggests epigenetic modification, a process that enhances or disrupts how DNA is read, is an integral component of the disease and its progression.


New class of superbug fighting antibiotics discovered

mrsaWashington, March 8 (ANI): Researchers have discovered a new class of antibiotics to fight bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other drug-resistant bacteria that threaten public health

A team of University of Notre Dame researchers led by Mayland Chang and Shahriar Mobashery's discovered a new class, called oxadiazoles, in silico (by computer) screening, which has shown promise in the treatment of MRSA in mouse models of infection.


Free birth control does not increase risky sex

Free birth control does not increase risky sexWashington, March 7 : Contrary to fears within a section of the society, women and teenaged girls who participate in free birth control programmes do not indulge in riskier sexual practices, says a new study.

The participants were less likely to have sex with more than one partner after the programme began, the study says.


Exposure to synthetic compound BPA could promote breast cancer growth

Exposure to synthetic compound BPA could promote breast cancer growthWashington, Mar 7 : Researchers at UT Arlington are a step closer to understanding how the commonly used synthetic compound bisphenol-A, or BPA, may promote breast cancer growth.

Subhrangsu Mandal, associate professor of chemistry/biochemistry, and Arunoday Bhan, a PhD student in Mandal's lab, looked at a molecule called RNA HOTAIR. HOTAIR is an abbreviation for long, non-coding RNA, a part of DNA in humans and other vertebrates.


Link between obesity and diabetes found

Link between obesity and diabetes foundWashington, Mar 7 : Researchers have now identified a critical link between obesity and diabetes.

It's by now well established that obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. But what exactly is it about extra body fat that leads to insulin resistance and blood glucose elevation, the hallmarks of diabetes?


Diabetes drug helps prevent brain damage in cerebral malaria infected mice

Diabetes drugWashington, May 7 : A new research has shown that a known drug can prevent brain damage in a cerebral malaria mouse model and eliminate subsequent neurological deficits.

Infection with the malaria parasite elicits a strong immune response in the patient, and it is known that both parasite and host response contribute to the nervous system problems in cerebral malaria.


Blind people can 'see' with sounds

Blind people can 'see' with soundsWashington, March 7 - People who are born blind are capable of learning to perceive the shape of the human body through soundscapes that translate images into sound.

With a little training, soundscapes representing the outlines and silhouettes of bodies cause the brain's visual cortex-and specifically an area dedicated in normally sighted people to processing body shapes-to light up with activity.


Eating red meat could up cancer risk in the gut

red meatWashington, Mar 7 : New reports suggest that eating red and processed meat could increase risk of developing cancer in the gut.

These reports have resulted in new nutritional recommendations that advise people to limit their intake of red and processed meats.


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