Protein in mosquito spit can stop spread of dengue virus: Study

Certain types of protein present in the Aedes aegypti's saliva binds the dengue virus (DENV) and inhibit its transmission to human cells and mice, says a study.

Antibodies against the saliva protein 'D7', which are present in humans when exposed to mosquito bites, might facilitate virus transmission and enhance disease severity.

Working on ways to reduce DENV transmission, lead researcher Michael Conway, explored how best to target the mosquito saliva protein to block transmission of DENV.

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Belief about nicotine content in cigs influence smokers craving

How the brain responds to nicotine depends on a smoker's belief about the nicotine content in a cigarette, states a recent research conducted at the University of Texas in Dallas.

The study found that smoking a nicotine cigarette but believing that it lacked nicotine failed to satisfy cravings related to nicotine addiction.

Contrary to the expectations, researchers found that in order to satisfy nicotine cravings, smokers had to not only smoke a cigarette with nicotine but also believe that they were smoking nicotine.

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Beware! Using Loofahs can lead to skin infections: Study

A recent research suggests that Loofahs carry bacteria, so much so that using one could defeat the very purpose of the shower and can even lead to infections.

The research has found that the natural scrubbers made from a tropical species of cucumber fibre, make the perfect breeding ground for bacteria.

It also highlighted that loofahs can transmit potentially pathogenic species of bacterial flora to the skin that under the right circumstances may even cause an infection.

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Smoking shortens lifespan of patients with terminal illness

A new research suggests that smoking may shorten the lives of those with terminal illness, such as ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).

ALS damages nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. These cells control many vital muscle functions, including speaking, swallowing and breathing.

Though no cure for this disease has been found, scientists have identified several risk factors, including genes, gender, age and underlying health issues.

For this study, researchers explored the link between tobacco and development of ALS.

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Old age home residents are given sedatives to control their behaviour, reveals study

A recent study has revealed that elderly care home residents are routinely being given dangerous 'chemical cosh' drugs to keep them sedated.

Despite a supposed crackdown on the use of the controversial pills, one in five is being given antipsychotics to control their behaviour and keep them calm.

According to a Daily Mail report, more than three quarters of the prescriptions were 'excessive' on these drugs.

The study stated that residents were often kept on the drugs for far longer than the recommended six weeks, and in some cases until they died.

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New test to predict the exact time an advanced ovarian cancer patient would live

A new computer test has been developed that is helping doctors to accurately predict the survival span of women suffering from advanced ovarian cancer.

The test, developed by experts at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, highlighted a 'staggering' difference between those patients who would live for five years or more and those who would die before that, reports Daily Mail.

It examines the cell 'ecosystem' around secondary tumors, in other parts of the body, once cancer has spread from the ovaries.

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Men suffering with severe anxiety are twice more likely to die from cancer

London [England], Sept. 20 : As per a recent research men, who suffer from severe anxiety are twice more likely to die from cancer than men, who stay calm and relaxed.

However, women with the mental health condition were at no greater risk, reports Daily Mail.

Researchers suggest that anxious men may be more likely to 'self-medicate' their anxiety by drinking and smoking more than women and both factors increase the likelihood of getting cancer.

Women are also quicker at going to the doctor, allowing the cancer to be detected earlier, making it easier to treat.

Preemies suffer lifetime breathing trouble, despite lung treatment after birth: Study

London [England]. Sept 19 : A study says that premature babies, who receive breathing treatments to improve lung function early in life, may have respiratory challenges as children and adolescents

Researchers focused on the most vulnerable subset of premature babies, those born at no more than 28 weeks gestation, reports the Daily Mail.

These babies are too frail and weak to breathe on their own; they often lack a lining in the lungs known as surfactant that keeps tiny air spaces called alveoli from collapsing with each exhalation.

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Those with common cancer types are more likely to live for a decade: Study

Washington D. C. [USA], Sept. 17 : According to recent estimates drawn by the Office of National Statistics (ONS), people, who develop skin, breast and prostate cancers are most likely to survive 10 years after diagnosis.

Those who develop skin cancer are the most likely to still be alive a decade after their diagnosis, with 89.4 percent of sufferers able to expect this lifespan.

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Screening at right time can prevent hundreds of deaths due to cervical cancer: Study

London [England], Sept. 17 : A recent research carried out by researchers from the Centre for Cancer Prevention suggests that lives of hundreds of cervical cancer patients could be saved if patients keep alert about it and go for screening at the initial stage.

The analysis estimated an additional 347 deaths per year in England could be prevented if women with with higher probability of the ailment attended cervical screening.

The analysis looked at screening history for more than 11,000 women diagnosed with cervical cancer and matched controls without cancer.

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