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Updated: 2 hours 21 min ago

Microsoft and Qualcomm partner to build low-cost Windows-on-ARM PCs

Thu, 12/08/2016 - 13:31

Windows_10.jpg

In an announcement made at the Windows Hardware Engineering (WinHEC) conference in Shenzhen, China, on Thursday morning, Microsoft said that it has partnered with Qualcomm to equip ARM devices with Windows 10 and Win32 apps.

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Minnesota Dept. of Health urging people to get flu shot

Wed, 12/07/2016 - 15:06

Amid the ongoing "National Influenza Vaccination Awareness Week," Minnesota public health officials are urging everyone who has not received a flu shot yet this season to get vaccinated to avoid the contagious seasonal disease.

The Minnesota Department of Health cautioned in a statement that flu/influenza is an awfully contagious respiratory infection that can be life-threatening, but getting vaccinated in advance can effectively fight off the virus.

As per the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), flu activity usually peaks between December and February; and get flu shot two weeks in advance provide the body to boost immunity against the virus.

Dr. Marny Benjamin, an emergency medicine physician at St. Louis Park-based Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital, said, "We're starting to see an uptick in flu cases. As the cold weather comes, everybody goes inside and it tends to be transmitted more and it's the season for influenza."

The ongoing National Influenza Vaccination Awareness Week started on Dec. 4 and it will run through Dec. 10, 2016. Public health official around the nation are using it to raise awareness about the highly contagious disease.

Flu/influenza symptoms include fever, headache, nausea and fatigue. Taking precautions to avert the highly contagious virus is crucial, especially for children, seniors and others with weakened immune system.

Companies: CDCGeneral: Health

Minnesota Dept. of Health urging people to get flu shot

Wed, 12/07/2016 - 15:06

Flu_Shot.jpg

Amid the ongoing "National Influenza Vaccination Awareness Week," Minnesota public health officials are urging everyone who has not received a flu shot yet this season to get vaccinated to avoid the contagious seasonal disease.

read more

US Supreme Court hands Samsung a victory in its patent dispute with Apple

Wed, 12/07/2016 - 13:10

On Tuesday, the US Supreme Court unanimously gave a ruling in favor of Samsung in the company's long-running patent-infringement scuffle with Apple - the Samsung Electronics Co. v. Apple Inc., No. 15-777, lawsuit.

In its ruling, the Supreme Court said that Samsung's alleged patent infringement -- resulting from its copy of parts of the Apple iPhone distinctive look -- does not make the company liable to give up $399 million in profits.

The ruling underscores the Supreme Court's unanimous opinion that the key consideration for damages for design patent infringement is the component of a device which violates the patents, and not necessarily the entire device.

The ruling by the Supreme Court turns on the meaning of a phrase in the federal law which states that companies found liable for infringement of design patents on an "article of manufacture" are liable for their total profits.

In announcing the Supreme Court's ruling, Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote for the court that, in some cases an "article of manufacture" may be the entire product sold to consumers - here, Samsung's smartphones -- while, in other cases, it may be the components found to have violated a design patent.

In concluding the court's ruling, the judge said that the relevant article of manufacture "need not be the end product sold to the consumer but may be only a component of that product."

Companies: AppleSamsungTechnology: Technology News

US Supreme Court hands Samsung a victory in its patent dispute with Apple

Wed, 12/07/2016 - 13:10

Samsung.jpeg

On Tuesday, the US Supreme Court unanimously gave a ruling in favor of Samsung in the company's long-running patent-infringement scuffle with Apple - the Samsung Electronics Co. v. Apple Inc., No. 15-777, lawsuit.

read more

STI risk linked to pubic hair grooming

Tue, 12/06/2016 - 15:37

Sexually active people who regularly groom their pubic hair are more likely to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than those who do not groom their pubic hair at all, a new study warned.

Dr. E. Charles Osterberg, of University of Texas, and colleagues asked more than 7,500 people ages 18 to 65 how often they removed or trimmed their pubic hair and what kind of tools they used. They also asked them how many sexual partners they'd had in their lives, and whether they had ever contracted an STI.

At total of 7,470 of the participants reported having at least one sexual partner, and 943 participants (13 per cent) reported having at least one of the following diseases -- herpes, human papillomavirus, pubic lice, chlamydia, syphilis, molluscum, gonorrhea or HIV.

The researchers concluded that those who regularly groomed their pubic hair were nearly 80 per cent more likely to contract an STI than those who never groomed their pubic hair.

Sharing the findings of the study, Osterberg said, "Modern society has dictated our perception of genital normalcy, and what it means to feel attractive or feminine or masculine has changed. This study sheds some light on a potential complication associated with the increasingly common practice of grooming."

The study cautioning people against the increasingly common practice of grooming appeared in the Dec. 5th edition of the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Region: TexasGeneral: HealthResearch

STI risk linked to pubic hair grooming

Tue, 12/06/2016 - 15:37

pubic-hair-grooming.jpg

Sexually active people who regularly groom their pubic hair are more likely to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than those who do not groom their pubic hair at all, a new study warned.

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Oklahoma medical center employees resign after veteran dies

Mon, 12/05/2016 - 16:01

At least four employees of a veterans' medical center in southeastern Oklahoma have resigned after maggots were found inside the wound of a person who had been hospitalized and treated at the facility.

Myles Deering, executive director for the state Department of Veterans Affairs, confirmed that the four employees, including a doctor's assistant and three nurses, opted to resign rather than facing the possibility of getting fired.

Deering added that the maggots were discovered inside the patient's wounds while he was still alive at the facility in Talahina, which is locate around 130 miles southeast of Tulsa. The executive director stressed that the maggots weren't the cause of the patient's death.

The patient, a veteran of U. S. military, was hospitalized at the facility for treatment of an infection. Identified as 73-year-old Owen Reese Peterson, the patient died of sepsis on Oct. 3, 2016.

Raymie Parker, the late veteran's son, grumbled, "During the 21 days I was there ... I pled with the medical staff, the senior medical staff, to increase his meds so his bandages could be changed. I was met with stonewall for much of that time."

The gruesome incident is currently being investigated by the district attorney for LeFlore and Latimer counties, who will determine if any charges should be filed.

Region: OklahomaGeneral: Health

Oklahoma medical center employees resign after veteran dies

Mon, 12/05/2016 - 16:01

Oklahoma_Medical_Center_Employees.jpeg

At least four employees of a veterans' medical center in southeastern Oklahoma have resigned after maggots were found inside the wound of a person who had been hospitalized and treated at the facility.

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Apple makes first public statements about its self-driving car effort

Mon, 12/05/2016 - 12:56

In a November 22-dated letter addressed to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), tech giant Apple has officially, for the first time, made public statements related to its much-reported 'Project Titan' self-driving car initiative.

In its letter to the NHTSA, Apple has publicly confirmed its much-rumored efforts in the self-driving car arena. Going by the indications, the company is apparently interested in self-driving software, rather than designing of building a self-driving car.

Shedding some light on Apple's plans, the company's Product Integrity Director Steve Kenner has written in the letter that the company is "excited about the potential of automated systems" in transportation as well as several other areas.

Kenner further asserted that machine learning is being used by Apple in order to offer "smarter, more intuitive, and more personal" devices and services; and added that the company is making huge investments in the study of machine learning and automation.

With Kenner suggesting that Apple is evidently focused on the software for controlling self-driving cars, Gartner analyst Mike Ramsey said in reference to Apple's plans: "You could interpret this as a sign that they're trying to invest where they feel like they can still make a difference, whereas building a car might be something they found really may not be worth it to them."

Companies: AppleNHTSABusiness: Technology

Apple makes first public statements about its self-driving car effort

Mon, 12/05/2016 - 12:56

apple-car.jpg

In a November 22-dated letter addressed to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), tech giant Apple has officially, for the first time, made public statements related to its much-reported 'Project Titan' self-driving car initiative.

read more

New data on risks vs. benefits of CAR-T cancer drugs to be shared this weekend

Sat, 12/03/2016 - 15:56

New data on riskss vs. benefit of experimental chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-Ts) will likely be in focus this weekend when companies will present their clinical results at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).

CAR-Ts are a promising but risky collection of customized cancer drugs, which are produced by genetically changing a patient's own T-cells in the laboratory. The altered T-cells are then pumped back into the patient's body to help the immune system to find and destroy cancer cells.

Kite Pharma Inc. and Juno Therapeutics Inc. are two of the few companies that are expected to announce their clinical results on their respective experimental drugs.

Juno's experimental drug, JCAR015, generated concerns earlier this year after five cancer patients died because of severe brain swelling after receiving the drug.

Brad Loncar, who manages the Loncar Cancer Immunotherapy ETF, said, "Juno has dug themselves into such a deep hole. My guess is that they may drop the JCAR015 program."

Bluebird Bio Inc. is also experimenting with its CAR-T therapy dubbed bb2121, which it developed in partnership with Celgene Inc.

Stock in Bluebird Bio gained 14 per cent on Thursday after a study showed that its bb2121 drug induced remission in several cancer patients with no troublesome side effects. Kite Pharma shares have tripled since a 2014 initial public offering, while Juno shares are now trading nearly 14 per cent below their IPO price.

Region: CaliforniaGeneral: Health

New data on risks vs. benefits of CAR-T cancer drugs to be shared this weekend

Sat, 12/03/2016 - 15:56

CAR-T.jpg

New data on riskss vs. benefit of experimental chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-Ts) will likely be in focus this weekend when companies will present their clinical results at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).

read more

4 new elements added to the periodic table

Sat, 12/03/2016 - 13:32

The periodic table, a tabular arrangement of various chemical elements, has just got a new look as four new elements have been added to its seventh row. The International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry has confirmed that it has officially added four new elements, with numbers 113, 115, 117 and 118, to the table. These elements will no longer be known by their placeholder names; instead they will have all-new monikers determined by their discoverers.

The four new elements are: Nihonium (element 113), Moscovium (element 115), Tennessine (element 117) and Oganesson (element 118).

Nihonium (Nh) is named for the Japanese word for Japan, which is Nihon; which Moscovium (Mc), Tennessine (Tn) and Oganesson (Og) have been named for Moscow, Tennessee and 83-year-old physicist Yuri Oganessian, respectively.

Prof. Natalia Tarasova, the president of IUPAC, "Universality of science, honoring places from three continents, where the elements have been discovered - Japan, Russia, the United States - and the pivotal role of human capital in the development of science, honoring an outstanding scientist - Professor Yuri Oganessian."

The table shows chemical elements in a tabular arrangement, ordered by their atomic number, electron configurations as well as their recurring chemical properties. The ordering of the chemical elements shows periodic trends. For instance, chemical elements with similar behavior are placed in the same column. With row seven of the periodic table now completed, chemists around the globe will likely start looking to the road ahead, with a hope to discover entirely new elements.

Region: SwitzerlandGeneral: Science News

4 new elements added to the periodic table

Sat, 12/03/2016 - 13:32

periodic_table.jpg

The periodic table, a tabular arrangement of various chemical elements, has just got a new look as four new elements have been added to its seventh row. The International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry has confirmed that it has officially added four new elements, with numbers 113, 115, 117 and 118, to the table.

read more

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