Health

Has Cancer found its bane in Vitamin C?

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 11 : US researchers have found that giving Vitamin C intravenously can produce super-high concentration in the blood, which has ability to attack cancer cells.

The findings, published recently in the journal Redox Biology, revealed that vitamin C breaks down easily, generating hydrogen peroxide, a so-called reactive oxygen species that can damage tissue and DNA.

Researchers from University of Iowa Health Care in the US also showed that tumor cells are much less capable of removing the damaging hydrogen peroxide than normal cells.

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Dear parents! Your regular exercise routine may set habit in your kids

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 10 : Dear parents, if you exercise regularly, then it can directly affect the health of your kids in childhood as well as adulthood.

A new study suggests that kids aged three to five are more likely to be physically active if their parents increase activity and reduce sedentary lifestyle.

The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, examined the impact of parent modeling of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in low-income American ethnic minorities, included data from more than 1,000 parent-child pairs.

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How long will you live? Your blood test can give the answer

London [UK], Jan. 8 : If it's true, it could be a game changer!

Believe it or not, scientists at Boston University claim to have discovered a game-changing blood test that could help predict lifespans.

The study, published in the journal Aging Cell on Friday, used biomarker data collected from 5,000 blood samples and analysed it against the donors' health developments over the subsequent eight years.

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Witnessing fear in loved ones can cause PSTD

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : A study reveals that if a person hears about a serious incident -- such as a gunfire exchange - from his/her loved ones or even strangers, it may change how information flows in the brain and can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Scientists in the study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, observed that fear in others may change how information flows in the brain.

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Now, apps on your smartphone can cut depression, anxiety

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : Now smartphones can help you treat your depression and anxiety.

Researchers from Northwestern University in the United States found that 13 speedy mini-apps called 'IntelliCare' significantly reduced 50 percent depression and anxiety in participants, who used the apps on their smartphones up to four times a day using psychotherapy or with antidepressant medication.

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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Dear parents, here's what you can do to prevent peanut allergy in kids

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 6 : A panel of experts says you can prevent development of peanut allergy in your kids by introducing foods containing peanuts until five years of age.

Clinical trial results showed that regular peanut consumption begun in infancy and continued until five years of age led to an 81 percent reduction in development of peanut allergy in infants deemed at high risk because they already had severe eczema, egg allergy or both.

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Good news! Pre-mature babies do better in early language development

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 5 : Pre-mature babies perform well in a developmental task linking language and cognition compared to their full-term counterparts, finds a new study.

The study was published online in journal of Developmental Science.

Researchers from Northwestern University in the US found that preterm infants are maturationally on par with full-term infants in establishing this link.

The study, the first of its kind with preterm infants, tests the relative contributions of infants' experience and maturational status.

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Alcohol abuse increases risk of heart conditions: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], January 4 : Think before you booze! It might lead to heart attack.

A new study says that alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure, as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity.

The study has been published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Planning a baby? Shed that fat

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 3 : In the already long list of disadvantages of obesity, researchers have added another point. A recent study suggests children of obese parents might be at risk of developmental delays.

The study, appearing in Pediatrics, was conducted by scientists at the NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

The investigators found that children of obese mothers were more likely to fail tests of fine motor skill--the ability to control movement of small muscles, such as those in the fingers and hands.

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Half of women want to lose at least one stone!

London [UK], January 2 : As the festive season is almost on the verge of signing off, loads of changes have come to your body.

You might have even put on some extra pounds! But don't worry, you are not the only one undergoing this feeling.

Two thirds of women are unhappy with the size and shape of their figure, a new survey has revealed, reports the Daily Mail.

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