United States

Witnessing fear in loved ones can cause PSTD

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : A study reveals that if a person hears about a serious incident -- such as a gunfire exchange - from his/her loved ones or even strangers, it may change how information flows in the brain and can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Scientists in the study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, observed that fear in others may change how information flows in the brain.

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Now, apps on your smartphone can cut depression, anxiety

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 7 : Now smartphones can help you treat your depression and anxiety.

Researchers from Northwestern University in the United States found that 13 speedy mini-apps called 'IntelliCare' significantly reduced 50 percent depression and anxiety in participants, who used the apps on their smartphones up to four times a day using psychotherapy or with antidepressant medication.

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

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Dear parents, here's what you can do to prevent peanut allergy in kids

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 6 : A panel of experts says you can prevent development of peanut allergy in your kids by introducing foods containing peanuts until five years of age.

Clinical trial results showed that regular peanut consumption begun in infancy and continued until five years of age led to an 81 percent reduction in development of peanut allergy in infants deemed at high risk because they already had severe eczema, egg allergy or both.

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Alcohol abuse increases risk of heart conditions: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], January 4 : Think before you booze! It might lead to heart attack.

A new study says that alcohol abuse increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure, as much as other well-established risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and obesity.

The study has been published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Planning a baby? Shed that fat

Washington D.C. [USA], Jan. 3 : In the already long list of disadvantages of obesity, researchers have added another point. A recent study suggests children of obese parents might be at risk of developmental delays.

The study, appearing in Pediatrics, was conducted by scientists at the NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

The investigators found that children of obese mothers were more likely to fail tests of fine motor skill--the ability to control movement of small muscles, such as those in the fingers and hands.

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Here's why sticking to that exercise schedule takes a toll on you

Just like every year, is losing weight the top criteria of your New Year's resolution?

A study finds as to why losing weight is not easy for obese people as it states physical inactivity results from the altered dopamine receptors - decreased motivation to move - rather than excess body weight.

The study, conducted on mice, has been published in the journal of Cell Metabolism.

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IVF mistake means eggs fertilisation by wrong sperm

A fertility clinic made a shocking revelation to several couples who trusted them with their fertility treatments.

A single mistake by In-vitro fertilisation (IVF) clinic means that women's eggs may have accidentally be fertilised with the wrong sperm.

Mix-ups have previously led to people accidentally having children with people they'd never met

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New drug may restore cardiac function after heart failure

Scientists have discovered a new experimental drug called Cimaglermin that may help restore cardiac functioning after heart failure.

The study is published in the journal of JACC: Basic to Translational Science.

Vanderbilt University researchers have examined the safety and efficacy of a single infusion of Cimaglermin, which acts as a growth factor for the heart, helping the structural, metabolic and contractile elements of the heart to repair itself following injury.

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Discrimination linked to poor sleep quality

Adults who perceive discrimination in daily life have higher rate of sleep problems, based on both subjective and objective measures, finds a study.

The findings, published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, indicated that higher discrimination scores were associated with 12 percent higher odds of poor sleep efficiency and a nine percent increase in the odds of poor sleep quality.

"Discrimination is an important factor associated with sleep measures in middle-aged adults," said study author Sherry Owens from West Virginia University, Morgantown.

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Are women avoiding pregnancy due to Zika virus?

A new study reveals that more than 50 percent of women in Brazil are avoiding pregnancy due to the Zika epidemic.

The study was published online in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care.

According to researchers, there is an urgent need to reconsider abortion criminalisation and also to improve reproductive health policies to ensure women have access to safe and effective contraceptives.

Since the outbreak of Zika in Brazil, there have been 1,845 confirmed cases of congenital Zika syndrome in babies.

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