United States

Free sanitary pads, puberty lessons can improve girls' school attendance

Giving free sanitary pads and lessons on puberty to teenage girls can be an effective way in boosting their attendance at schools, which can have long-term economic implications for women in low and middle-income countries, reveals a new study.

The study has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Researchers from the University of Oxford in London indicated that in schools where sanitary pads and puberty education were not provided absenteeism among girls were 17 percent higher compared with schools where girls received pads, education or a combination of both.

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Another benefit! Sunlight can boost your immune system

The best-known benefit of sunlight is that it boosts our body's vitamin D supply, but a new study has revealed that sunlight also energises T cells that play a central role in human immunity.

This study, published in the journal of Scientific Reports, showed that sunlight directly activates key immune cells by increasing their movement.

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Heart attacks, strokes prevented through health checks-ups

A study led by Queen Mary University of London has revealed that health check-up programmes may prevent heart attacks, strokes or death from these causes in its first five years.

According to researchers, the NHS Health Check program in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes or death from these causes in its first five years.

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World's first Chikungunya vaccine developed

US researchers have developed a vaccine for chikungunya fever made from an insect-specific virus that does not have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective.

The study indicated that the vaccine quickly produces a strong immune defense and completely protects mice and nonhuman primates from disease when exposed to the chikungunya virus.

The findings were published in journal of Nature Medicine.

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New world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders

A team of doctors at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have recently set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders.

"We've set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders," said researcher Hans M. Nordahl.

A team of doctors and psychologists from NTNU and the University of Manchester in England, led by Nordahl, examined the effects of structured talk therapy and medication on patients with social anxiety disorders.

This study has been published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

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That lemon slice in your drink can do more harm than good

That pre-sliced pieces of lime in your festive gin or non-alcoholic beverage in bars and restaurants might not be the best thing as these slices may cause infectious diseases at various body sites, warns a new study.

The Journal of Environmental Health conducted and published a study that investigated how hygienic lemon slices in bars and restaurants are.

Researchers from New York University's school of medicine swabbed lemon slices which accompanied drinks at 21 different restaurants.

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15 percent of people with HIV remain unaware

In a recent study published in Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, researchers have estimated that some 15 percent of people living with HIV remain unaware of their infection.

Despite evidence that HIV incidence rates in the United States are decreasing modestly in recent years, at least 44,000 people are still infected with HIV each year.

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User-friendly designs in medication packaging can reduce probability of errors

Washington D. C. [US], Dec. 11 : A recent research published in the journal Human Factors suggests that a simple redesign of medication packages can lead to a decrease in the frequency of patient errors and accidental overdoses.

Medication errors are a common patient safety issue in the United States, with 1.5 million adverse drug events reported annually, often occurring in a home or other outpatient setting.

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Unconditional love of pets helps manage mental health problems

The unconditional love and support of pet provides an immediate source of calm and therapeutic benefits for owners with long-term mental health conditions, says a new study.

The findings were published in the open access journal BMC Psychiatry.

Researchers from the University of Manchester suggested that pets should be considered as main source of support in the management of long-term mental health problems.

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Do yoga daily to prevent prehypertension

Practicing yoga for one hour daily can reduce blood pressure in people with prehypertension, says a new study conducted by Indian researchers.

The study was presented at the 68th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India (CSI) in Kochi, India.

"Patients with prehypertension (slightly elevated blood pressure) are likely to develop hypertension (high blood pressure) unless they improve their lifestyle," said lead author Dr Ashutosh Angrish, a cardiologist at Sir Gangaram Hospital in Delhi, India.

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