United States

Inhale through nose to enhance memory: Study

A recent study reveals that inhaling through nose heightens memory and response to fearful stimuli, whereas the effects disappear while mouth breathing.

The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

According to Northwestern Medicine, the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall.

They found that individuals were able to identify a fearful face more quickly, if they encountered the face when breathing in compared to breathing out.

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Read e-book to your kids to increase their vocabulary: Study

Do you encourage your children in reading and writing? A study reveals that four-year-old kids with average and low vocabulary skills learn more effectively with an adult reading an e-book to them than relying solely on the e-book's voiceover.

The study has been published in the journal Early Education and Development.

Researchers from University of Toronto divided the four-year-old kids into two groups -- one group with children of higher than average vocabulary level and one group with average and lower English vocabulary.

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Consuming handful of nuts everyday can keep major ailments away

A recent analysis of all current studies on nut consumption and disease risk has revealed that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart ailment, cancer and other diseases.

The study, published in BMC Medicine journal, found that 20g a day - equivalent to a handful - can cut people's risk of coronary heart disease by nearly 30 percent, their risk of cancer by 15 percent and their risk of premature death by 22 percent.

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Got kidney stones? Alpha-blockers may be effective

To help people get rid of large kidney stones, US Researchers have promoted a non-surgical way by suggesting off-label use of drugs called alpha blockers that can facilitate stone passage.

The study was published online in the British Medical Journal.

Physicians are eager to find non-surgical ways to help the two-thirds of kidney stone patients who need more than just extra hydration to pass their stones.

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Cataract ups risk of depression in older adults

Washington D. C. [USA], Dec. 3 : Older adults, especially women, with cataract are more likely to have symptoms of depression, says a new study.

The study was published in the Optometry and Vision Science journal.

According to researchers from Soochow University in China, the link between cataract and depression is independent of other factors and appears strongest among older adults with lower education.

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Is saturated fat good for health?

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 3 : A recent diet intervention study (FATFUNC) raises questions regarding the validity of a diet hypothesis that has dominated for more than half a century: that dietary fat and particularly saturated fat is unhealthy for most people.

The study, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found strikingly similar health effects of diets based on either lowly processed carbohydrates or fats.

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Scientists develop new device to detect complicated prostate cancer

Washington D.C [US], Dec. 3 : A recent research demonstrates that a novel imaging agent can quickly and accurately detect metastasis of prostate cancer, even in areas where detection has previously been difficult.

Published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the Phase 1 dose-escalation study of Zr-89-desferrioxamine-IAB2M (Zr-89-Df-IAB2M), an anti-PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen) minibody, in patients with metastatic prostate cancer shows its effectiveness in targeting both bone and soft tissue lesions.

Hearing loss caused by chemotherapy can now be prevented

Washington D. C. [USA], Dec. 3 : In first of its kind study, researchers have developed a new treatment that can prevent chemotherapy-induced hearing loss to about half in kids and adolescents with cancer.

The results of the study have been published in Lancet Oncology.

The study found that the greatest benefit was seen in children younger than 5 years of age, who are most susceptible to, and also most affected by, cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

New study throws light on how brain stimulation affects memory reactivation

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 2 : A recent study conducted at the University of Notre Dame examined the fundamental problem an individual's brain has to solve, that is, keeping information in mind or active, so the brain can act accordingly.

The common theory is that the information is kept in mind by neurons related to the information actively firing throughout a delay period.

However, in the new paper published in Science, the researchers give weight to the synaptic theory, a less well-known and tested model.

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New guidelines suggest overweight children should be screened for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 2 : According to a recent set of guidelines published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, a screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years.

The new guidelines, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, also outline recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care of children and adolescents with NAFLD, a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences.

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