United States

Lying on back during pregnancy increases stillbirth risk: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 22 : A recent study, published in The Journal of Physiology suggests, that pregnant women lying down on their back may place stress on the fetus, which could increase the risk of stillbirth.

Researchers at the University of Auckland have found that pregnant woman who lie face can change the baby's heart rate and activity state which suggests that the fetus adapts by reducing its oxygen consumption.

This finding may explain the increased risk of stillbirth in the supine (lying upwards) position.

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Eat walnuts and be stress-free!

Stress is inevitable for a college student following an intense daily routine, but a recent study has come up with a solution to alleviate stress and cheer you up.

In addition to the familiar mantra of healthy food, regular exercise and proper sleep, now a recent study published in the Nutrients journal, has found that walnuts could be a key to a happier state-of-mind.

In this first intervention study in humans, Pribis measured the effect of walnut consumption on mood.

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Children admitted to ICUs develop acute kidney injury

A study published online in The New England Journal of Medicine has found acute kidney disease developing in children admitted to pediatric intensive care units.

One of every four children admitted to pediatric ICU's around the world develops acute kidney injury (AKI), which increases the risk of death, as well as longer and more intensive hospitalizations.

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Vehicular pollution escalates asthma risk in children: Study

A recent study published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology Journal showed that residential distance to a major road (a marker of exposure to traffic-related air pollution TRAP) is associated with increased allergic inflammation.

The exposure is associated with increased plasma levels of interleukin 31 (IL-31), a cytokine that promotes allergic inflammation.

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Newly developed Biomaterial could treat vascular bleeding

The Science Translational Medicine journal recently reported about development of a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding.

Developed by the researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the biomaterial has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery.

Endovascular embolization is a minimally invasive procedure that treats abnormal blood vessels in the brain and other parts of the body beginning with a pinhole puncture in the femoral artery.

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Gulp of red wine before smoking prevents vascular injury

Red wine helps prevent cardiovascular disease and drinking a glass or two of it, before lighting up a cigarette, can counteract some of the short-term negative effects of smoking on blood vessels, says a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

Cigarette smoke causes acute endothelial damage, vascular and systemic inflammation, and cellular aging. Red wine stimulates the formation of endothelium-dependent relaxation factors such as nitric oxide, which improve endothelial function in coronary arteries possibly because of the high phenol concentration in red wine.

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Stop Smoking Services facing budget cut: Report

Stop Smoking Services across England are under threat as a result of ongoing budget cuts after six in ten local authorities (59 per cent) were forced to reduce their funding in the last year, says a joint report by ASH and Cancer Research UK.

Local authorities became responsible for Stop Smoking Services and tobacco control in 2013. These services were previously delivered by the NHS.

Cuts to the Public Health Grant from HM Treasury - which local authorities rely on to fund these services are putting enormous pressure on councils.

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Skipping breakfast, insufficient sleep increases risk of obesity

According to a new research, child obesity is linked to multiple factors such as mothers smoking in pregnancy, children skipping breakfast and not having a regular bedtime or sufficient sleep.

All three issues appear to be important factors in predicting whether a child will become overweight or obese. Since they are early life factors, they can be modified and the research highlights the possibility that prompt intervention could curb the growth in childhood obesity.

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Gold nanoparticles helps in delivering drugs into cancer cells

A recent research found that gold nanoparticles helps in delivering a drug right into the heart of cancer cells,

According to the new laboratory research, transferring effective drugs into cancer cells, particularly to where the chromosomes are stored, was one of the biggest hurdles in treating cancer. Gold nano-particles have proven to be well suited to being absorbed into cells, safely delivering drugs that could otherwise be blocked.

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Child's academic performance linked to gestational age

How your child performs in school has got a strong link with his/her gestational age, finds a recent study.

The study indicates that being born either too early or too late is likely to affect their academic performance.

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