Washington

Is saturated fat good for health?

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 3 : A recent diet intervention study (FATFUNC) raises questions regarding the validity of a diet hypothesis that has dominated for more than half a century: that dietary fat and particularly saturated fat is unhealthy for most people.

The study, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found strikingly similar health effects of diets based on either lowly processed carbohydrates or fats.

General: 

Scientists develop new device to detect complicated prostate cancer

Washington D.C [US], Dec. 3 : A recent research demonstrates that a novel imaging agent can quickly and accurately detect metastasis of prostate cancer, even in areas where detection has previously been difficult.

Published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the Phase 1 dose-escalation study of Zr-89-desferrioxamine-IAB2M (Zr-89-Df-IAB2M), an anti-PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen) minibody, in patients with metastatic prostate cancer shows its effectiveness in targeting both bone and soft tissue lesions.

Hearing loss caused by chemotherapy can now be prevented

Washington D. C. [USA], Dec. 3 : In first of its kind study, researchers have developed a new treatment that can prevent chemotherapy-induced hearing loss to about half in kids and adolescents with cancer.

The results of the study have been published in Lancet Oncology.

The study found that the greatest benefit was seen in children younger than 5 years of age, who are most susceptible to, and also most affected by, cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

New study throws light on how brain stimulation affects memory reactivation

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 2 : A recent study conducted at the University of Notre Dame examined the fundamental problem an individual's brain has to solve, that is, keeping information in mind or active, so the brain can act accordingly.

The common theory is that the information is kept in mind by neurons related to the information actively firing throughout a delay period.

However, in the new paper published in Science, the researchers give weight to the synaptic theory, a less well-known and tested model.

General: 

New guidelines suggest overweight children should be screened for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Washington D. C [US], Dec. 2 : According to a recent set of guidelines published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, a screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years.

The new guidelines, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, also outline recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care of children and adolescents with NAFLD, a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences.

General: 

GVK BIO announces launch of GMP compliant analytical services laboratory

Washington D. C [USA], Dec. 2 : In a recent study, scientists from The University of Texas invented a new device that could revolutionize the delivery of medicine to treat cancer as well as a host of other diseases and ailments.

Led by Lyle Hood, the study was published in the Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology.

"The problem with most drug-delivery systems is that you have a specific minimum dosage of medicine that you need to take for it to be effective," Hood said.

General: 

Menstrual cycle doesn't impact training, performance: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study, published in the Journal of Physiology, has found that doing fixed intensity exercise during menstrual cycle does not affect a woman's autonomic heat responses (skin blood flow and sweating).

That's according to a collaboration between Massey University, the University at Buffalo and the University of Otago. They also found that exercise performance was impaired by humid heat due to the reduced ability of the body to sweat effectively.

General: 

Lying on back during pregnancy increases stillbirth risk: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 22 : A recent study, published in The Journal of Physiology suggests, that pregnant women lying down on their back may place stress on the fetus, which could increase the risk of stillbirth.

Researchers at the University of Auckland have found that pregnant woman who lie face can change the baby's heart rate and activity state which suggests that the fetus adapts by reducing its oxygen consumption.

This finding may explain the increased risk of stillbirth in the supine (lying upwards) position.

General: 

Dear boss, pay attention to your angry employees

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : Dear bosses if you are not concern about your employees' emotion then it may cost you billions of dollars as the latter may indulge in unethical workplace behavior, ranging from tardiness to theft, says a study.

The new research suggests that it is important for supervisors to pay attention to employees' emotions especially when the emotion is anger as they are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work, even if the source of their anger is not job-related.

Region: 
General: 

Alcohol dependency in young adults may have long-lasting effects

A study says that young adults with symptoms of alcohol dependence may see health effects late in life, even decades after conquering their problem drinking.

Researchers found that, of 664 U.S. male veterans, those who had symptoms of alcohol dependence for at least five years in young adulthood generally had poorer physical and mental health by the time they were in their 60s.

And that was true even if they'd gotten control over their drinking problems by the age of 30.

The findings are surprising, said lead researcher Randy Haber.

Region: 
General: 

Pages