Health News

Excess weight may up women’s risk of breast cancer recurrence and death

Excess weight may up women’s risk of breast cancer recurrence and death Washington, August 27 : Obese and overweight women may face increased risk of recurrence of the most common type of breast cancer despite optimal cancer treatment, according to a new study.

The study's results suggest that extra body fat causes hormonal changes and inflammation that may drive some cases of breast cancer to spread and recur despite treatment.

Women who are obese when they are diagnosed with breast cancer have an increased risk of dying prematurely compared with women of normal weight.


Why men don’t eat vegetables

Why men don’t eat vegetables Washington, Aug 25 : Researchers claim to have found out part of the reason why men are much less likely to eat their veggies than women.

In a new study, men were reported to have less favorable attitudes than women about the value of eating fruits and vegetables.

Men also said they had less control over their fruit and vegetable intake than women did.

The study showed that "men don't believe as strongly as women that fruit and vegetable consumption is an important part of maintaining health," study researcher John A. Updegraff, associate professor of social and health psychology at Kent State University in Ohio, said.


Obese kids at higher risk of gallstones

Obese kids at higher risk of gallstones Washington, August 25 : Children who are overweight or obese face an increased risk of having gallstones, a new study has claimed.

Researchers of the new study found that children and adolescents who were overweight were twice as likely to have gallstone disease as compared to children and adolescents who had a normal body mass index.

Those who were moderately obese were four times as likely to have gallstones and those who were extremely obese were six times as likely to have gallstones.


How astronauts can protect their bones through diet and exercise

How astronauts can protect their bones through diet and exerciseWashington, August 25 : In a study that may help solve one of the key problems facing future explorers heading beyond low Earth orbit, researchers have found that eating the right diet and exercising hard in space helps protect International Space Station astronauts' bones.

In the new study, research evaluated the mineral density of specific bones as well as the entire skeleton of astronauts who used the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a 2008 addition to the space station that can produce resistance of as much as 600 pounds in microgravity.

Resistance exercise allows astronauts to "lift weights" in weightlessness.


Which professionals drink most coffee

Which professionals drink most coffee Washington, August 25 : Nurses drink the most coffee followed closely by physicians, a new study has found.

The study, which was conducted by Career Builder and Dunkin'' Donuts wanted on more than 3,600 workers, found that more than two in five Americans say they are less productive without coffee.

40 percent of those surveyed between the ages of 18-24 admit they can't concentrate without coffee.

The study also found that 37 percent of American workers drink two or more cups of coffee during their workday, ABC News reported.

The 12 heaviest coffee drinkers are:


Microwave ovens `may help produce cheaper solar energy technology`

Microwave ovens `may help produce cheaper solar energy technology` Washington, August 25 : The simple technology used in microwave ovens has found an important application in the solar energy industry, providing a new way to make thin-film photovoltaic products with less energy, expense and environmental concerns.

Engineers at Oregon State University have for the first time developed a way to use microwave heating in the synthesis of copper zinc tin sulfide, a promising solar cell compound that is less costly and toxic than some solar energy alternatives.


Humans are cancer prone, but chimps are not

Humans are cancer prone, but chimps are notWashington, Aug 24 - Chimps and humans share a whopping 96 percent genetic similarity -- surprisingly the simians rarely develop cancer, while their human cousins are particulalry vulnerable.

Georgia Tech's Soojin Yi, a biologist, looked at brain samples of the two species. She found that differences in the modification of certain DNA, called methylation, may contribute to such changes.

The results also hint that this process of DNA modification plays an important role in some disease-related phenotypes (composite of an organism's observable characteristics or traits) in humans, including cancer and autism, the American Journal of Human Genetics reports.


PSA testing boosts survival for prostate cancer patients

PSA testing boosts survival for prostate cancer patients Washington, August 24 : Introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing for screening and monitoring prostate cancer has improved survival rates of patients, as it has led to early and more sensitive detection of the disease.

It has also resolved the disparity survival rates between African-American and Caucasian men, according to a new study.


How human airways clear mucus out of lungs

How human airways clear mucus out of lungs Washington, August 24 : A runny nose and a wet cough caused by a cold or an allergy may irritate you, but human airways rely on sticky mucus to expel foreign matter, including toxic and infectious agents, from the body.

Now, a study by Brian Button and colleagues from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, has explained how human airways clear such mucus out of the lungs.

The findings may give researchers a better understanding of what goes wrong in many human lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma.


New biosensor detects glucose in saliva and tears for diabetes testing

New biosensor detects glucose in saliva and tears for diabetes testing Washington, August 24 : Painful pinpricks for diabetes testing could soon be a thing of past as researchers have created a new type of biosensor that can detect minute concentrations of glucose in saliva, tears and urine.

It might be manufactured at low cost because it does not require many processing steps to produce.

"It's an inherently non-invasive way to estimate glucose content in the body," said Jonathan Claussen, a former Purdue University doctoral student and now a research scientist at the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory.


Simple eye test may help detect Alzheimer’s in early stage

Simple eye test may help detect Alzheimer’s in early stage Washington, August 24 : A simple eye test may help combat Alzheimer's disease by detecting the sufferers well in advance of the destruction caused by the killer brain disease, scientists claim.

Alzheimer's is an incurable condition and experts believe the key to tackling it - and stopping it - lies in early detection.

Research led by Lancaster University - in partnership with Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS foundation trust - has shown that people with Alzheimer's have difficulty with one particular type of eye tracking test, the Daily Express reported.


20pc high school students drink, smoke and do drugs during school hours

20pc high school students drink, smoke and do drugs during school hours New York, Aug 23 : Nearly one in five students do drugs, drink or smoke cigarettes during the school day, a new survey has revealed.

Kid said that marijuana was the drug easiest to buy on school grounds.

While the revelation that 17 percent of high school students may be half in the bag on any given day may come as a shock to some parents or teachers, it's old news to the 1,000 students surveyed by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

Some 86 percent told survey-takers that they were well aware their glassy-eyed classmates were stoned or drunk.


Video captures protein traffic inside brain cell

Video captures protein traffic inside brain cellWashington, Aug 23 - Using a new imaging technique, scientists have created spectacular video footage on the movement of proteins inside a neuron (brain cell).

"Your brain is being disassembled and reassembled every day," said study co-author Don Arnold, associate professor of molecular and computational biology at the University of Southern California Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

"One week from today, your brain will be made up of completely different proteins than it is today. This video shows the process. We've known that it was happening, but now we can watch it happen," said Arnold, according to the journal Cell Reports.


New era camouflage makeup shields soldiers from searing heat of blasts

New era camouflage makeup shields soldiers from searing heat of blastsWashington, August 23 : Researchers have developed a new camouflage face paint that both hides soldiers from the enemy and shields their faces from the searing heat of bomb blasts.

According to the new report, firefighters also could benefit from the new heat-resistant makeup.

Robert Lochhead, who presented the report, explained that soldiers have used face paint for centuries for one kind of protection - to help their skin blend in with the natural environment and shield them from enemies.


Low-income and more screen time fuel kids’ soda and junk food intake

Low-income and more screen time fuel kids’ soda and junk food intake Washington, August 23 : Preschoolers from low-income neighbourhoods and kids who spend more than two hours a day in front of a TV or video-game console are more likely to consume sugary soda and juice, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Alberta's faculties of Physical Education and Recreation, School of Public Health and Medicine and Dentistry surveyed parents to assess the dietary habits of 1,800 preschoolers in the Edmonton region as part of a larger study on diet, physical activity and obesity.


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