Health News

Texas man `fractures` penis after taking sex pill

Texas man `fractures` penis after taking sex pill Washington, August 31 : A U. S. man has sued the manufacturers of a sexual enhancement supplement, claiming that it caused his penis to fracture in a horrifying incident at Houston motel last year.

Even though Adrian Carter of Texas blames the supplement for the incident, three urologists said that penile fractures are most often the result of rough sex.

According to the lawsuit in the district court of Harris County, Texas, the 29-year-old said he purchased VirilisPro in the "early morning hours" at a Chevron gas station en route to the Scottish Inn, where he had sex with his "paramour".


How steady job could benefit diabetics

How steady job could benefit diabetics Washington, August 30 : For people who are diabetic or prone to diabetes, having a steady job appears to be good for their health.

And the benefit lies in their adherence to anti-diabetic medications, and not just because of the insurance coverage, according to a new University of Michigan study.

It found that that jobless working-age people with diabetes are less likely to adhere to their oral anti-diabetic medications than diabetics who are employed.

Further, people of working age with diabetes are more likely to be unemployed than those who do not have diabetes.


Heavy smoking more than doubles risk of fatal brain bleed

Heavy smoking more than doubles risk of fatal brain bleed Washington, August 30 : People who smoke more than 20 cigarettes a day are more than twice as likely to have a potentially fatal brain bleed as a result of a burst aneurysm, a new study has found.

If a smoker quits, the risk diminishes over time, but it still persists suggests the study.

An aneurysm is a bulge in a weakened artery, which, if it bursts causes blood to leak into the brain. The chances of surviving a ruptured aneurysm are only about 50 percent and those who do survive often live with disability for the rest of their life.


Disruption of circadian rhythm causes obesity and other health problems

Disruption of circadian rhythm causes obesity and other health problems Washington, August 30 : In a new study, researchers have focussed on how the human clock struggles to stay in tune with the irregular meal, sleep and work schedules of the developed world, and how this might influence health and even cause obesity.

Daily or "circadian" rhythms including the sleep wake cycle, and rhythms in hormone release are controlled by a molecular clock that is present in every cell of the human body.

This human clock has its own inbuilt, default rhythm of almost exactly 24 hours that allows it to stay finely tuned to the daily cycle generated by the rotation of the earth.


When kids’ temper tantrums are actually signs of mental health problems

When kids’ temper tantrums are actually signs of mental health problems Washington, August 30 : In a new study, researchers have given parents and professionals a new tool to know when to worry about young children's misbehaviour.

Researchers from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine have developed an easy-to-administer questionnaire specifically designed to distinguish the typical misbehaviour of early childhood from more concerning misbehaviour.

This will enable early identification and treatment of emerging mental health problems, key to preventing young children struggling with their behaviour from spiralling downward into chronic mental health problems.


`Super spaghetti` to make pasta healthier

`Super spaghetti` to make pasta healthier Washington, August 30 : A team of researchers are working towards producing better quality pasta that also adds greater value to human health.

Two research projects - being conducted by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Cell Walls at the University's Waite Campus - will start next month in collaboration with researchers from the Italian universities of Bari and Molise.


More abortions linked to risk of preterm birth and low birth weight in babies

More abortions linked to risk of preterm birth and low birth weight in babies Washington, August 30 : Women who have had three or more abortions have a higher risk of some adverse birth outcomes, such as delivering a baby prematurely and with a low birth weight, according to a new study.

The research found that among 300,858 Finnish mothers, 31,083 had had one induced abortion between 1996-2008, 4,417 had two, and 942 had three or more induced abortions before a first birth (excluding twins and triplets).


Chronic stress may up stroke risk

Chronic stress may up stroke risk Washington, August 30 : A recent study has linked chronic stress, prompted by major life stressors and type A personality traits, to a high risk of stroke.

Chronic stress, manifested as physical and/or mental symptoms in response to stressors lasting longer than 6 months has been linked to a heightened risk of heart disease. But its impact on the risk of stroke has not been clear.

The research team base their findings on150 adults, with an average age of 54, who had been admitted to one stroke unit, and 300 randomly selected healthy people of a similar age who lived in the same neighbourhood.


Chocolate may help cut stroke risk in men

Chocolate may help cut stroke risk in men Washington, August 30 : Eating a moderate amount of chocolate each week may help lower risk of stroke in men, according to a new study.

Men in the study who ate the largest amount of chocolate, about one-third of a cup of chocolate chips (63 grams), had a lower risk of stroke compared to those who did not consume any chocolate.

"While other studies have looked at how chocolate may help cardiovascular health, this is the first of its kind study to find that chocolate, may be beneficial for reducing stroke in men," said study author Susanna C. Larsson, PhD, with the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.


Cutting calories may not help you live longer

Cutting calories may not help you live longer Washington, August 30 : Restricting your diets may not help you live longer, suggest a new study on monkeys.

The 23-year study by the National Institute on Aging found that calorie-restricted rhesus monkeys - which have a similar genetic code, median lifespan and physiology to humans - didn't live any longer than monkeys who ate a heavier diet, according to CBS News.


Synthetic tuberculosis vaccines could save millions of lives

Synthetic tuberculosis vaccines could save millions of lives Washington, August 29 : Cases of one of the world''s deadliest diseases-tuberculosis-are spiralling at an alarming rate, due to the ineffectiveness of the existing vaccines, a new study including an Indian-origin researcher has revealed.

"Tuberculosis is a global health threat, and it is a highly communicable disease that may influence practically anyone and everyone," says senior author Javed Agrewala of the CSIR-Institute of Microbial Technology in Chandigarh, India.

"There is a serious need and challenge for the scientific community to develop alternative vaccination approaches for the control of the disease."


Regular aspirin use may prolong life of men with prostate cancer

Regular aspirin use may prolong life of men with prostate cancer Washington, August 29 : An aspirin a day could lower risk of death from prostate cancer, especially in men with high risk of the disease, a new study has suggested.

Preclinical studies have shown that aspirin and other anticoagulation medications may inhibit cancer growth and metastasis, but clinical data have been limited previously.

Dr. Kevin Choe, assistant professor of radiation oncology at UT Southwestern, and colleagues looked at almost 6,000 men in the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) database who had prostate cancer treated with surgery or radiotherapy.


Newly found African drug may offer `single-dose` malaria cure

Newly found African drug may offer `single-dose` malaria cure Washington, August 29 : Researchers have revealed that a recently discovered compound may have the potential to become part of a single-dose cure and also be able to block transmission of the parasite from person to person.

The compound from the aminopyridine class, code named MMV390048, shows potent activity against multiple points in the malaria parasite's lifecycle.

On this basis it was selected by MMV's ESAC for further development - making it the first compound researched on African soil to enter preclinical development in partnership with MMV.


Exercise `beneficial for cancer patients but few oncologists suggest it`

Exercise `beneficial for cancer patients but few oncologists suggest it` Washington, August 29 : Even though numerous studies have shown the powerful effect that exercise can have on cancer care and recovery, many patients are reluctant to exercise, and few discuss it with their oncologists, researchers say.

"As doctors, we often tell patients that exercise is important, but to this point, nobody had studied what patients know about exercise, how they feel about it and what tends to get in the way," Andrea Cheville, lead author from Mayo Clinic, said.


There's a gene behind male moroseness

There's a gene behind male morosenessWashington, Aug 29 - Scientists have identified a gene that seems to make women happy, but does not work for men. They surmise that this might be the reason why women are often more cheerful than men.

Scientists at the University of South Florida (USF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute reported that the low-expression form of the gene monoamine oxidase A
(MAOA) is tied to higher self-reported happiness in women.


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