Health News

Male contraceptive pill comes closer to reality

Male contraceptive pill comes closer to reality Washington, August 17 : Researchers have finally found a compound that may offer the first effective and hormone-free birth control pill for men.

The new study shows that the small molecule makes male mice reversibly infertile without putting a damper on their sex drive.

When the animals stop taking this new form of birth control, their sperm rebound and they are again able to produce perfectly healthy offsprings.

"This compound produces a rapid and reversible decrease in sperm count and motility with profound effects on fertility," James Bradner of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the lead author of the study, said.


Exercise and neuroprotective agent combo may accelerate stroke recovery

Exercise and neuroprotective agent combo may accelerate stroke recoveryWashington, August 16 : A therapy combining exercise with the neurovascular protective agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) improved recovery from stroke in a rat model, according to a new study.

GSNO is a compound found naturally in the body and it has no known side effects or toxicity.


New system that helps brain get rid of waste identified

New system that helps brain get rid of waste identified Washington, August 16 : Neuroscientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have discovered a previously unrecognised system that drains waste from the brain at a rapid clip.

The highly organized system acts like a series of pipes that piggyback on the brain's blood vessels, sort of a shadow plumbing system that seems to serve much the same function in the brain as the lymph system does in the rest of the body - to drain away waste products.


Low hormone levels may up risk for metabolic disease

Low hormone levels may up risk for metabolic disease Washington, August 16 : A study has for the first time shown a link between low levels of a specific hormone and increased risk of metabolic disease in humans

The study focuses on the hormone adropin, which is believed to play an important role in regulating glucose levels and fatty acid metabolism.

The hormone was previously identified by Scripps Research Associate Professor Andrew Butler's laboratory during an investigation of obese and insulin-resistant mice.


Humans’ sense of fairness `did not evolve from great ape relatives`

Humans’ sense of fairness `did not evolve from great ape relatives`Washington, August 16 : Humans could be the only animals that are sensitive to fairness, a new study has suggested.

According to a research team involving Queen Mary, University of London (UK), a sense of fairness is an important part of human behaviour, yet it did not evolve from our closest living relatives.

The study tested whether our great ape relatives, the chimpanzees and bonobos, have a sense of fairness like humans.

The scientists, involving Professor Keith Jensen, from Queen Mary’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, put the apes through a series of ultimatum games.


Daily dose of walnuts `boost sperm quality`

Daily dose of walnuts `boost sperm quality` Washington, August 16 : Eating 2.5 ounces of walnuts per day improves semen quality in healthy young men, researchers say.

According to a new study by UCLA researchers, eating 75 grams of walnuts a day improves the vitality, motility, and morphology of sperm in healthy men aged 21 to 35.

Dr. Wendie Robbins and her colleagues at the University of California, Los Angeles decided to investigate whether increasing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical for sperm maturation and membrane function, would increase sperm quality in men consuming a Western-style diet.


Boozing mums-to-be inhibit child’s growth for 9 years

Boozing mums-to-be inhibit child’s growth for 9 years Washington, August 16 : Expectant mothers who drink a large glass of wine a day stunt their children's growth up to the age of nine, a new study on the effects of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) on growth and body composition throughout childhood has found.

"This study is the first to examine the effects of heavy PAE on growth in a single cohort over time using a more rigorous single statistical model with repeated measures for each outcome," R. Colin Carter, corrsdponding author of the study from Harvard Medical School, said.


CYCLOPS genes may serve as Achilles’ heel for cancer

CYCLOPS genes may serve as Achilles’ heel for cancer Washington, August 16 : Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have discovered an entirely new class of genes that may serve as an Achilles' heel for many forms of cancer.

The researchers identified 56 such genes, only a few of which had previously been identified as potential targets for cancer therapy. Unlike most such targets, these genes don't cause normal cells to turn cancerous. Instead, they are essential to all cells but have been disrupted as cancer progresses.


Revolutionary drug allows morphine to relieve pain without addiction

Revolutionary drug allows morphine to relieve pain without addiction Washington, August 15 : In a major breakthrough, an international team of scientists have proven that addiction to morphine and heroin can be blocked, while at the same time increasing pain relief.

The team from the University of Adelaide and University of Colorado has discovered the key mechanism in the body's immune system that amplifies addiction to opioid drugs.

Laboratory studies have shown that the drug (+)-naloxone (pronounced: PLUS nal-OX-own) will selectively block the immune-addiction response.


Vaccine for heart disease comes closer to reality

 	 http://topnews.in/usa/files/heart-disease.jpegWashington, August 15 : A number of research studies have demonstrated inflammation's role in fuelling dangerous arterial plaque buildup, also known as atherosclerosis, which is the underlying cause of most heart attacks and strokes, but knowledge of which immune cells are key to this process has been limited - until now.

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology have now identified the specific type of immune cells (CD4 T cells) that orchestrate the inflammatory attack on the artery wall.


New strategy can make chemotherapy more effective sans side effects

 New strategy can make chemotherapy more effective sans side effects Washington, August 15 : Researchers in Leuven (VIB/KU Leuven) have uncovered a strategy that would make chemotherapy more effective while reducing the harmful side effects on healthy organs.

The effectiveness of chemotherapy is first and foremost limited by the difficulties of delivering the anticancer drugs to the actual tumor.


Yo-yo dieting does not thwart weight loss efforts

Yo-yo dieting does not thwart weight loss effortsWashington, August 15 : A history of yo-yo dieting - the repetitive loss and regain of body weight, also called weight cycling - does not negatively affect metabolism or the ability to lose weight long term, according to researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Until now, the degree to which weight cycling may impact metabolism or thwart a person's ability to lose weight in the long run has been unclear.


Artificial retina restores normal vision in blind mice

Artificial retina restores normal vision in blind mice Washington, August 15 : Two researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have made a remarkable advance in longstanding efforts to restore vision to blind.

They have deciphered a mouse's retina's neural code and coupled this information to a novel prosthetic device to restore sight to blind mice.

The researchers say they have also cracked the code for a monkey retina - which is essentially identical to that of a human -and hope to quickly design and test a device that blind humans can use.


Exercise `may improve quality of life during and post cancer`

Exercise `may improve quality of life during and post cancer`Washington, August 15 : Exercise may improve quality of life for people with cancer, a new study has revealed.

In two separate Cochrane systematic reviews, the authors gathered together evidence showing that activities such as walking and cycling can benefit those who are undergoing or have completed treatment for cancer.

People with cancer suffer from many different physical, psychological and social effects related to cancer, as well as treatment-related symptoms.

There has been much interest in the effects of exercise on physical and psychological well-being in people with cancer.


Meditation could help combat loneliness in elderly

Meditation could help combat loneliness in elderly Washington, August 15 : A simple meditation program lasting just eight weeks reduces loneliness in older adults, a new study has revealed.

Further, knowing that loneliness is associated with an increase in the activity of inflammation-related genes that can promote a variety of diseases, the researchers at UCLA examined gene expression and found that this same form of meditation significantly reduced expression of inflammatory genes.


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