Health News

Popeye’s fav Vitamin C-rich spinach `may help protect against dementia`

Popeye’s fav Vitamin C-rich spinach `may help protect against dementia`Washington, September 12 : In a new study, researchers have discovered that the serum-concentration of the antioxidants vitamin C and beta-carotene are significantly lower in patients with mild dementia than in control persons.

Their findings suggest that antioxidant rich fruit and vegetables like spinach, carrots and apricots could help fight the disease's devastating symptoms.

It might thus be possible to influence the pathogenesis of Alzheimer; s Disease (AD) by a person's diet or dietary antioxidants. 74 AD-patients and 158 healthy controls were examined for the study.


Exercise may actually reduce motivation for food

Exercise may actually reduce motivation for foodWashington, September 13 : A new study from Brigham Young University has challenged the common assumption that you can "work up an appetite" with a vigorous workout.

It found that 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise in the morning actually reduces a person's motivation for food.

Professors James LeCheminant and Michael Larson measured the neural activity of 35 women while they viewed food images, both following a morning of exercise and a morning without exercise. They found their attentional response to the food pictures decreased after the brisk workout.


Risk-glorifying video games likelier to lead teens to drive recklessly

Risk-glorifying video games likelier to lead teens to drive recklesslyWashington, September 12 : Teenagers who play mature-rated, risk-glorifying video games may be more likely than those who don't to become reckless drivers who experience increases in automobile accidents, police stops and willingness to drink and drive, a new study has claimed.

"Most parents would probably be disturbed to learn that we observed that this type of game play was more strongly associated with teen drivers being pulled over by the police than their parenting practices," Jay G. Hull, lead author of the study from Dartmouth College, said.


Fish oil `doesn’t cut heart disease risk`

Fish oil `doesn’t cut heart disease risk`Washington, September 12 : Researchers have found that supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is not associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, cardiac death, sudden death, heart attack or stroke.

Evangelos C. Rizos and colleagues from the University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece, performed a large-scale synthesis of the available randomized evidence on 70,000 patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the association between omega-3 PUFAs and major cardiovascular outcomes.


Anti-dengue initiative welcomes latest progress in vaccine development

Anti-dengue initiative welcomes latest progress in vaccine developmentWashington, September 12 : The Dengue Vaccine Initiative (DVI) welcomed new clinical trial results that reveal progress in developing the first-ever dengue vaccine on Tuesday.

Pharmaceutical company Sanofi Pasteur reported results from the first study conducted to evaluate the efficacy of any dengue vaccine candidate against clinical dengue disease in a population naturally exposed to dengue.

Dengue vaccine development efforts have been difficult because dengue is caused by four different related viruses, known as DENV 1, 2, 3 and 4.


Obesity may be triggered by `genes or environment`

Obesity may be triggered by `genes or environment`Washington, September 12 : In a new study, researchers have tried to determine who gets fat.

Timothy Frayling, Professor of Human Genetics at the University of Exeter thinks that genetic factors are the main driver for obesity in today's environment.

Twin and adoption studies show consistently that variation in body mass index has a strong genetic component, with estimated effects of up to 70 percent, he says.

Studies also show that people carrying two copies of a gene associated with obesity (the FTO gene) are, on average, heavier than those carrying two copies of the protective version.


Why severely obese women have difficulty conceiving from IVF

Why severely obese women have difficulty conceiving from IVFWashington, September 12 : Researchers have gained further insight into why obese women often have poor reproductive outcomes.

Catherine Racowsky from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), and performed by Ronit Machtinger examined 276 mature human eggs that failed to fertilize from women who were undergoing in vitro fertilization
(IVF) procedures.


Mild asthma patients `may not need daily steroids`

Mild asthma patients `may not need daily steroids`Washington, Sept 12 : Asthmatics who inhale the low-dose steroid medicine to reduce inflammation as a daily routine do no better than those who turn to their inhalers only when they have symptoms, a new study has suggested.

According to the researchers, the findings suggest a different, personalized, and far less expensive approach to treating the common inflammatory condition.

In effect, the study challenges national and international guidelines that have been in place for 20 years.


Brit people of South Asian descent `likelier to develop diabetes`

 Brit people of South Asian descent `likelier to develop diabetes`Washington, September 11 : Approximately half of all South Asians, Africans and African Caribbeans in the UK will develop Type 2 diabetes by age 80 compared with only one in five of European descent, a new study has revealed.

The findings come from the Southall and Brent REvisited (SABRE) study, a large-scale population based study funded by the Wellcome Trust and British Heart Foundation which has followed nearly 5000 middle-aged Londoners of European, South Asian, African and African Caribbean descent for over 20 years.


Cutting red meat consumption can benefit health as well as planet

 Cutting red meat consumption can benefit health as well as planetWashington, Sept 11: Cutting out on consumption of red and processed meat consumption would not only prompt a fall in chronic diseases, but our carbon footprint would shrink by 28 million tonnes a year, a study suggests.

Food and drink accounts for a third of all greenhouse gas emissions attributable to UK consumers, with livestock farming accounting for around half of this proportion, owing to the large quantity of cereals and soy imported for animal feed.


Exercise regimen plus healthy diet crucial in fighting cancer

Exercise regimen plus healthy diet crucial in fighting cancerWashington, Sept 11 : A new study has reaffirmed that exercise, along with good nutrition, plays a crucial role in maintaining health and fighting diseases.

"Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide, ranking third among all cancer-related deaths. Clinical and experimental studies have shown that physical exercise helps to prevent cancer and improving quality of life," Dr. Luis Fernando Barbisan, a coauthor of the study and a researcher in the Department of Morphology at the Institute of Biosciences of Sao Paulo State University in Brazil, said.


Heart stem cells from newborns may help mend kids’ broken hearts

Heart stem cells from newborns may help mend kids’ broken heartsWashington, September 11 : Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine including one of an Indian origin have found a novel way to treat serious heart problems in children.

They conducted the first direct comparison of the regenerative abilities of neonatal and adult-derived human cardiac stem cells.

They found that cardiac stem cells (CSCs) from newborns have a three-fold ability to restore heart function to nearly normal levels compared with adult CSCs.

Further, in animal models of heart attack, hearts treated with neonatal stem cells pumped stronger than those given adult cells.


`Humanized` mice enable malaria research breakthrough

`Humanized` mice enable malaria research breakthroughWashington, September 11 : Using a novel human liver-chimeric mouse model developed at Oregon Health and Science University and Yecuris Corporation, researchers at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute have made e a breakthrough that will greatly accelerate studies of the most lethal forms of human malaria.

Plasmodium falciparum, one of two human-specific malaria parasites, is a global health crisis, causing more than 216 million new infections annually and resulting in an estimated 655,000 deaths, according to the World Health Organization.


Concerns over ‘poorly-paid’ Indian workers ‘mistranslating’ patients’ letters outsourced by NHS hosp

 Concerns over ‘poorly-paid’ Indian workers ‘mistranslating’ patients’ letters outsourced by NHS hospWashington, Sep 11 : British MPs have expressed concern over National Health Service''s (NHS) latest practice of sending hundreds of thousands of confidential letters about patients to India, to be typed up by poorly-paid workers.

British parliamentarians have warned that complicated medical terms may be mis-translated by Indian workers, leading to `tragic consequences'.


Sustained drinking may lead to early stroke: New study

Sustained drinking may lead to early stroke: New studyWashington, Sep 11 - People taking three or more alcoholic drinks in daily life may be at a higher risk of stroke earlier in life than those who do not drink heavily, a new study has found.

The observation has been made in a new study to be published Tuesday in Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, Xinhua reported.

The study covered 540 people with an average age of 71 who had a type of stroke called intracerebral hemorrhage. The participants, as well as the care givers or relatives of the participants, were interviewed about their drinking habits.


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