Science News

NASA captures 'mid-level' solar flare

NASA captures 'mid-level' solar flareWashington, July 9 - NASA has captured mid-level solar flares at its Solar Dynamics Observatory.

According to NASA , the solar flares, which have been classified as an M6.5-class flare, caused short-lived impacts to high frequency radio communications on the sunlit side of Earth.

The agency said that the initial solar radio observations suggest a coronal mass ejection (CME) was likely associated with this even, but any transient would not likely have a trajectory directly at Earth, and that more analysis will be conducted as more data becomes available. (ANI)


Jupiter's Moon shaped same way as Earth's surface: Study

Jupiter's Moon shaped same way as Earth's surface: StudyWashington, July 9 - A new laboratory model suggested that the ridges and troughs shaped on the surface of Jupiter's icy moon Ganymede were formed the same way as Earth's tectonic process.

Physical analog models were created that could simulate geologic structures in laboratory settings so that the developmental sequence of various phenomena could be studied as they occur.

The research suggested that characteristic patterns of ridges and troughs, called grooved terrain on Ganymede, resulted from its surface being stretched.


NASA says purported 'UFO' on Mars mere 'hot pixel'

NASA says purported 'UFO' on Mars mere 'hot pixel'Washington, July 8 - NASA has recently stated that the bright light recorded by the Curiosity rover on Mars was just a 'hot pixel' and not a UFO .

Justin Maki, leader of the team that built and operates Curiosity's navigation camera, said that in the thousands of images that they have received from Curiosity, they have seen ones with bright spots nearly every week and it was the hot pixel that has been around since they started using the Right Navcam, the Huffington Post reported.

He further added that these could be caused by cosmic-ray hits or sunlight glinting from rock surfaces.


New Mars map provides insight into water modifying planet's surface

New Mars map provides insight into water modifying planet's surfaceWashington, July 8 - A new geological map of mars has revealed new insight into surface modified by water over much of planet's history.

The map has been produced by Scott C. Mest and David A. Crown of the Planetary Science Institute, which established that the water in this area would be in the canyon systems of Waikato Vallis in the north part of the map and Reull Vallis in the central part of the map and these canyons were believed to have formed when underground water was released from plains materials to the surface, causing the ground to collapse.


'World's biggest-ever flying bird' had 24-foot wide wingspan

'World's biggest-ever flying bird' had 24-foot wide wingspanWashington, July 8 - Scientists have identified the fossilized remains of an extinct giant that could be the world's biggest-ever flying bird with 20-24-foot wingspan and soaring ability that enabled the creature to stay aloft for long distances without flapping its wings.

The creature has surpassed size estimates based on wing bones from the previous record holder i. e. a long-extinct bird named Argentavis magnificens.

Author Dan Ksepka of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in Durham, North Carolina, said that the upper wing bone alone was longer than his arm.


New 'Duck-billed' dino tracksite found in Alaska

New 'Duck-billed' dino tracksite found in AlaskaWashington, July 7 : New tracksite filled with footprints of duck-billed dinosaurs', technically known as hadrosaurs, have been found by three paleontologists in Alaska's Denali National Park.

The discovery has demonstrated that they not only lived in multi-generational herds but thrived in the ancient high-latitude, polar ecosystem.


Scientists decode plants' genes linked with elevated CO2 levels

Scientists decode plants' genes linked with elevated CO2 levelsWashington, July 7 : The researchers have discovered a new genetic pathway, encoded with four genes, in plants that control the density of breathing pores in response to elevated CO2 levels.

Julian Schroeder, biology professor, said that for each carbon dioxide molecule that was incorporated into plants through photosynthesis, a plant loses about 200 hundred molecules of water through their stomata.


Scientists rewrite human evolution timeline

Scientists rewrite human evolution timelineWashington, July 4 - Scientists have synthesized a new theory that the traits that have allowed humans to adapt and thrive in a variety of varying climate conditions evolved in Africa gradually and at separate times.

Many traits unique to humans were long thought to have originated in the genus Homo between 2.4 and 1.8 million years ago in Africa and it was earlier believed that large brain, long legs, the ability to craft tools and prolonged maturation periods have evolved together at the start of the Homo lineage as African grasslands expanded and Earth's climate became cooler and drier.


How giraffes stay upright on 'spindly legs' revealed

How giraffes stay upright on 'spindly legs' revealedWashington, July 4 - A highly specialized ligament structure has been identified by the researchers at the Royal Veterinary College that is thought to prevent giraffes' legs from collapsing under the immense weight of these animals.

Christ Basu, a PhD student in the Structure and Motion Lab said that giraffes were heavy animals but had unusually skinny limb bones for an animal of this size which means that their leg bones were under high levels of mechanical stress.

The researchers hypothesized that this arrangement may help solve the mystery of how the giraffes' spindly legs could support its weight.


Study disproves signal clues from two potentially habitable planets

Study disproves signal clues from two potentially habitable planetsWashington, July 4 - Scientists have revealed that the controversial signals were not coming from the two planets, which might support life, orbiting the dwarf star Gliese 581.

Suvrath Mahadevan, an assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, said they have proven that some of the other controversial signals were not coming from two additional proposed Goldilocks planets in the star's habitable zone, but instead were coming from activity within the star itself.


Key to measuring stars' age lies in acoustic vibrations

Key to measuring stars' age lies in acoustic vibrationsWashington, July 4 - Young stars can be distinguished from adolescent stars by measuring their acoustic vibrations using ultrasound technology similar to that used in the field of medicine, according to the researchers.

Konstanze Zwintz, a postdoctoral researcher at KU Leuven's Institute for Astronomy said that their data showed that the youngest stars vibrated slower while the stars nearer to adulthood vibrate faster.

Zwintz asserted that a star's mass had a major impact on its development and stars with a smaller mass evolved slower whereas, heavy stars grew faster and aged more quickly.


Rivalry brings out best in one's athletic performance

Rivalry brings out best in one's athletic performanceWashington, July 3 - A new study has revealed that harnessing personal rivalries could boost up an individual's athletic performance and motivate them to work harder.

The research that surveyed runners and used data from 184 races found that even local races often produce rivals who pushed each other to higher levels of performance, and that several other factors lead to rivalry like similarity (e. g. age and gender), repeated competition and closely-decided contests.


Key to Tibetans' altitude adaptation may lie in extinct denisovans

Key to Tibetans' altitude adaptation may lie in extinct denisovansWashington, July 3 - A new study has found that the altitude adaptation in Tibet might have been caused by the introgression of DNA from extinct Denisovans or Denisovan-related individuals into humans.

According to the scientists, this work sheds new light into understanding human's adaptation to diverse environments including temperature extremes, new pathogens, and high altitude.


Unwed parents should marry before their kids' turn 3: Study

Unwed parents should marry before their kids' turn 3: StudyWashington, July 3 - A new study has claimed that the best time to tie the knot for unmarried couples who have kids, is before their kids' 3rd birthday.

Federal policies have often presumed that unmarried parents will be most receptive to marriage right after a baby's birth, a period that has been dubbed the 'magic moment', and as per author Christina Gibson-Davis from Duke University, it turns out that the period lasts longer than conventional wisdom has held, lasting even longer for some subgroups.

But patterns vary greatly by race, with more African-American mothers marrying much later than mothers of other races or ethnicities.


Titan's ocean may be as saline as Earth's Dead Sea: Study

Titan's ocean may be as saline as Earth's Dead Sea: StudyWashington, July 3 - Scientists have revealed that NASA's Cassini mission have provided firm evidence that ocean inside the Saturn 's largest moon, Titan, might be extremely salty like Earth's Dead Sea.

The new results come from a study of gravity and topography data collected during Cassini's repeated flybys of Titan during the past 10 years.


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