Science News

Key to measuring stars' age lies in acoustic vibrations

Key to measuring stars' age lies in acoustic vibrationsWashington, July 4 - Young stars can be distinguished from adolescent stars by measuring their acoustic vibrations using ultrasound technology similar to that used in the field of medicine, according to the researchers.

Konstanze Zwintz, a postdoctoral researcher at KU Leuven's Institute for Astronomy said that their data showed that the youngest stars vibrated slower while the stars nearer to adulthood vibrate faster.

Zwintz asserted that a star's mass had a major impact on its development and stars with a smaller mass evolved slower whereas, heavy stars grew faster and aged more quickly.


Rivalry brings out best in one's athletic performance

Rivalry brings out best in one's athletic performanceWashington, July 3 - A new study has revealed that harnessing personal rivalries could boost up an individual's athletic performance and motivate them to work harder.

The research that surveyed runners and used data from 184 races found that even local races often produce rivals who pushed each other to higher levels of performance, and that several other factors lead to rivalry like similarity (e. g. age and gender), repeated competition and closely-decided contests.


Key to Tibetans' altitude adaptation may lie in extinct denisovans

Key to Tibetans' altitude adaptation may lie in extinct denisovansWashington, July 3 - A new study has found that the altitude adaptation in Tibet might have been caused by the introgression of DNA from extinct Denisovans or Denisovan-related individuals into humans.

According to the scientists, this work sheds new light into understanding human's adaptation to diverse environments including temperature extremes, new pathogens, and high altitude.


Unwed parents should marry before their kids' turn 3: Study

Unwed parents should marry before their kids' turn 3: StudyWashington, July 3 - A new study has claimed that the best time to tie the knot for unmarried couples who have kids, is before their kids' 3rd birthday.

Federal policies have often presumed that unmarried parents will be most receptive to marriage right after a baby's birth, a period that has been dubbed the 'magic moment', and as per author Christina Gibson-Davis from Duke University, it turns out that the period lasts longer than conventional wisdom has held, lasting even longer for some subgroups.

But patterns vary greatly by race, with more African-American mothers marrying much later than mothers of other races or ethnicities.


Titan's ocean may be as saline as Earth's Dead Sea: Study

Titan's ocean may be as saline as Earth's Dead Sea: StudyWashington, July 3 - Scientists have revealed that NASA's Cassini mission have provided firm evidence that ocean inside the Saturn 's largest moon, Titan, might be extremely salty like Earth's Dead Sea.

The new results come from a study of gravity and topography data collected during Cassini's repeated flybys of Titan during the past 10 years.


Kangaroos use their tail as 'fifth leg'

Kangaroos use their tail as 'fifth leg'Washington, July 3 - A new study has revealed that kangaroos use their tail as a "fifth leg" and plant their tails on the ground in combination with their front and hind legs.

According to the study by researchers at Simon Fraser University showed that the animals move with a "pentapedal" gait, which provides new insight into the diversity of biological movement, and specific insight into why humans walk the way they do.


Fish can remember things even after 12 days

Fish can remember things even after 12 daysWashington, July 2 : Contrary to the belief that fish have a memory span of 30 seconds, it turns out that the aquatic creatures are smarter than we think, and can recall context and associations even 12 days later.

According to the Canadian scientists, who studied African Cichlids, a popular aquarium species, fish demonstrate several complex behaviours, including aggression, causing the scientists to predict that they could be capable of advanced memory tasks.


Samsung launches 4 new Galaxy 'budget' smartphones

Samsung launches 4 new Galaxy 'budget' smartphonesWashington, July 1 - Tech giant Samsung has reportedly launched four new budget Galaxy devices - Galaxy Core II, Galaxy Star 2, Galaxy Ace 4, and Galaxy Young 2.

Samsung is making efforts to capture more market share and launch something for every segment. Just last week, Sprint announced it would exclusively offer the new fitness-focused, water-resistant, and dust-proof Galaxy S5 Sport.

The Korean company is focusing on 'affordability' with the new devices. However, they have not disclosed the pricing for the devices.

The Galaxy Core II was the highest-end of the bunch, with a 4.5-inch display, 1.2 GHz quad-core processor, CNET reported.


Two American astronauts shave head after losing WC bet

Two American astronauts shave head after losing WC betWashington, July 1 - American astronauts Steve Swanson and Reid Wiseman shaved their heads when they lost a bet with fellow ISS astronaut Alexander Gerst post U. S. lost to Germany in the World Cup.

According to the bet, if the U. S. won, Gerst would allow Swanson and Wiseman to paint the U. S. flag on his head, but if Germany won, then Swanson and Wiseman would shave their head, CBS News reported.

Mission Control suggested that the American astronauts look on the bright side, pointing out that bald was more aerodynamic when flying.

Wiseman jokingly thanked for the shave through twitter. (ANI)


New technology controls brain activity with light-sensitive protein

New technology controls brain activity with light-sensitive proteinWashington, June 30 - Scientists have revealed that a new technology, Optogenetics, allowing them to control brain activity by shining light on neurons and relies on light-sensitive protein s that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells.

According to the study, this technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled.


Only reduction in CO2 emissions can help address climate change

Only reduction in CO2 emissions can help address climate changeWashington, June 28 - A new study has said that the politically expedient way to mitigate climate change is essentially no way at all.

Among the climate pollutants humans put into the atmosphere in significant quantities, the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) are the longest-lived, with effects on climate that extend thousands of years after emissions cease.


Study finds new hypothesis behind ice age caused 2.6m yrs ago

Study finds new hypothesis behind ice age caused 2.6m yrs agoWashington, June 28 - A new research has provided major latest theory that might explain the cause of ice age that covered large parts of the Northern Hemisphere 2.6 million years ago.

The study found that previously unknown mechanism by which the joining of North and South America changed the salinity of the Pacific Ocean and caused major ice sheet growth across the Northern Hemisphere.


Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice ages

Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice agesWashington, June 28 - Researchers have long tried to explain why ice-age cycles became longer and more intense some 900,000 years ago, switching from 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.

However, now researchers report that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or may have stopped at that time, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the Northern Hemisphere.


How one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed 550m yrs ago

How one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed 550m yrs agoWashington, June 27 - A new research has revealed one of these reefs located on dry land in Namibia was built almost 550 million years ago by the first animals to have hard shells.

The creatures known as Cloudina built reefs in ancient seas that now form part of Namibia. Their fossilized remains are the oldest reefs of their type in the world.


Now, NASA will carry your messages to aliens

Now, NASA will carry your messages to aliensWashington, June 27 - NASA is planning to upload crowd sourced messages from Earth into the outer space through its New Horizons space probe.

According to Space. com, Jon Lomberg , who started this project and also helped create the human time capsules carried on board the Voyager spacecrafts, will be responsible for curating the collated material along with NASA and online voters, the Verge reported.


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