Science News

Now, torch that could help visually impaired to see objects

Now, torch that could help visually impaired to see objectsWashington, Aug 12 - A new research has come up with an advanced device called the Enactive Torch that could help the visually impaired better navigate everyday life with the help of infra-red sensors to "see" objects in front of it.

The research conducted in University of Cincinnati could help all the aging baby boomers, injured veterans, diabetics and white-cane-wielding pedestrians navigate the blurred edges of everyday life.


First most realistic 3D 'brain-like' tissue model created

First most realistic 3D 'brain-like' tissue model createdWashington, Aug 12 - Bioengineers have recently created a 3D model that can mimic biochemical and electrophysiological responses like a real brain, which offers new options for understanding brain function, disease and trauma, and treatment in better way.

Tufts University researchers have developed the first complex three-dimensional model made of brain-like cortical tissue that exhibits biochemical and electrophysiological responses and could function in the laboratory for months.


Rise in Arctic temperatures linked with extreme weather events

Rise in Arctic temperatures linked with extreme weather eventsWashington, Aug 12 - A new study has demonstrated that the swift rise in the Arctic temperatures is because of weather extremes in the northern hemisphere such as heatwaves in the US and flooding in Europe.

The researchers from Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany found out that Rossby waves to become stuck in a static pattern as they resonated around the planet for weeks at a time, bringing extreme weather to whatever region of the northern hemisphere they affect.


2010 Chile earthquake triggered icequakes in Antarctica

2010 Chile earthquake triggered icequakes in AntarcticaWashington, Aug 11 - A new study has revealed that Antarctica's frozen ground is receptive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes after the researchers found out that 2010 Chile earthquake was the reason behind icequakes in Antarctica.

The study conducted by the Georgia Institute of Technology removed the longer-period signals as the seismic waves spread from the distant epicenter to identify high-frequency signals from nearby source.


Do you crave for temporarily unavailable goods?

Do you crave for temporarily unavailable goodsWashington, Aug 11 - Scientists have analyzed whether people's desire regarding something that is not available at that moment, increases or decreases over time.

In a recent study titled 'How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire,' Ayelet Fishbach, from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and co-author Xianchi Dai of Chinese University of Hong Kong, found if a person is aware of a substitute for something, the longer they have gone without, the weaker their desire for the non-consumed good becomes.


Mice study reveals link between 'lead' and obesity

Mice study reveals link between 'lead' and obesityWashington, Aug 10 - A new study on mice shows that exposure to 'lead' through their mothers could cause obesity.

Researchers at the University of Michigan claim that mice whose mothers were exposed to the chemical, had an 8-10 percent increase in weight.

Dana Dolinoy, senior author of the study said that the data supported the obesogen hypothesis that toxicant exposures in the womb contribute to the higher rate of obesity.


Now, Disney stories to have 'feel effect' vocab

Now, Disney stories to have 'feel effect' vocabWashington, Aug 9 - A "feel effect" vocabulary has been developed by Disney researchers that will tell stories with sense of touch.

The researchers from Disney worked with human participants and a Carnegie Mellon University psychologist to establish a library of 40 feel effects matched to the descriptions that designers without a deep background in haptic effects could readily understand.


Learning music enhances language, reading skills of disadvantaged kids

Learning music enhances language, reading skills of disadvantaged kidsWashington, Aug 9 - A new study has demonstrated that reading and language skills of disadvantaged children can be enhanced by learning to play a musical instrument or to sing.

The research conducted at the American Psychological Association's 122nd Annual Convention highlight the role learning music can have on the brains of youth in impoverished areas.

Nina Kraus, PhD, a neurobiologist at Northwestern University said that research had shown that there were differences in the brains of children raised in insolvent environments that affect their ability to learn.


10 yr study finds most astronauts rely on sleeping pills

10 yr study finds most astronauts rely on sleeping pillsWashington, Aug 08 - A new extensive study has revealed that most of the astronauts suffer through sleep deprivation in the weeks leading up to and during space flight, so they depend on the pills to fall asleep.

Laura K. Barger, associate physiologist in the BWH Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, said that sleep deficiency was pervasive among crew members and it's clear that more effective measures are needed to promote adequate sleep in crew members, both during training and space flight, as sleep deficiency has been associated with performance decrements in numerous laboratory and field-based studies.


NASA's Curiosity rover provides clues to Mars' past habitability

NASA's Curiosity rover provides clues to Mars' past habitabilityWashington, August 8 - NASA's Curiosity rover has completed two Earth years on Mars and has provided detailed analysis of the planet's geology and mineralogy, as well as clues to past habitability.

According to research led by PSI Senior Scientist Rebecca M. E. Williams, Curiosity science co-Investigator, the Mars Science Laboratory rover provided the most definitive evidence yet of an ancient stream flow on Mars, which is the first confirmation of sedimentary conglomerates on another planet.


'Perseid Meteor shower' to share sky with 'full Moon' on August 12-13

'Perseid Meteor shower' to share sky with 'full Moon' on August 12-13Washington, Aug 08 - It has been predicted that Perseid meteor shower, an annual celestial event, will be held around August 12-13 in 2014 but this year it will also share the sky with full Moon light that might hide many of the fainter meteors.

Alan MacRobert, a senior editor at Sky and Telescope, said that this year the Moon would be just two days past full on the peak night, so moonlight would fill the sky that would hide many of the fainter meteors but the bright ones will still shine through, Sky and Telescope magazine reported.


Unraveling mystery of sun's birth comes closer to reality

Unraveling mystery of sun's birth comes closer to realityWashington, Aug 8 - Scientists have made progress in finding out how the sun was born.

The team led by Monash University researchers, Dr Maria Lugaro and Professor Alexander Heger, investigated the solar system's prehistoric phase and the events, by using radioactive nuclei found in meteorites.

They found the last time when heavy elements such as gold, silver, platinum, lead and rare-earth elements were added to the solar system matter by the stars that produced them.


Climate change linked to strength, frequency of tornadoes

Climate change linked to strength, frequency of tornadoesWashington, Aug 7 - A new study has revealed that climate change may be causing more and deadlier tornadoes that are hitting the US.

According to the research by a Florida State University geography professor, climate change may be playing a key role in the strength and frequency of tornadoes and though tornadoes are forming fewer days per year, they are forming at a greater density and strength than ever before.


Burrowing animals may have been pivotal in stabilizing Earth's oxygen

Burrowing animals may have been pivotal in stabilizing Earth's oxygenWashington, Aug 7 - A new study evolution of the first burrowing animals may have played a major role in stabilizing oxygen on Earth.

The scientists have revealed that when the first burrowing animals, which evolved around 540 million years ago, began to mix up the ocean floor's sediments (a process known as bioturbation), their activity came to significantly influence the ocean's phosphorus cycle and as a result, the amount of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere.


Hubble spots possible `Zombie Star` that survived supernova explosion

Hubble spots possible `Zombie Star` that survived supernova explosionWashington, Aug 7 - Scientists have revealed that NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted a possible "zombie star" that may have been left behind after an unusually weak supernova explosion.

The researchers believe that this faint supernova may have left behind a surviving portion of the dwarf star, a sort of zombie star.

While examining Hubble images taken years before the stellar explosion, astronomers identified a blue companion star feeding energy to a white dwarf, a process that ignited a nuclear reaction and released a weak supernova blast, Type Iax, which is less common than its brighter cousin, Type Ia.


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