Science News

Only reduction in CO2 emissions can help address climate change

Only reduction in CO2 emissions can help address climate changeWashington, June 28 - A new study has said that the politically expedient way to mitigate climate change is essentially no way at all.

Among the climate pollutants humans put into the atmosphere in significant quantities, the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) are the longest-lived, with effects on climate that extend thousands of years after emissions cease.


Study finds new hypothesis behind ice age caused 2.6m yrs ago

Study finds new hypothesis behind ice age caused 2.6m yrs agoWashington, June 28 - A new research has provided major latest theory that might explain the cause of ice age that covered large parts of the Northern Hemisphere 2.6 million years ago.

The study found that previously unknown mechanism by which the joining of North and South America changed the salinity of the Pacific Ocean and caused major ice sheet growth across the Northern Hemisphere.


Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice ages

Ancient ocean currents may have changed pace and intensity of ice agesWashington, June 28 - Researchers have long tried to explain why ice-age cycles became longer and more intense some 900,000 years ago, switching from 41,000-year cycles to 100,000-year cycles.

However, now researchers report that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or may have stopped at that time, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the Northern Hemisphere.


How one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed 550m yrs ago

How one of Earth's oldest reefs was formed 550m yrs agoWashington, June 27 - A new research has revealed one of these reefs located on dry land in Namibia was built almost 550 million years ago by the first animals to have hard shells.

The creatures known as Cloudina built reefs in ancient seas that now form part of Namibia. Their fossilized remains are the oldest reefs of their type in the world.


Now, NASA will carry your messages to aliens

Now, NASA will carry your messages to aliensWashington, June 27 - NASA is planning to upload crowd sourced messages from Earth into the outer space through its New Horizons space probe.

According to Space. com, Jon Lomberg , who started this project and also helped create the human time capsules carried on board the Voyager spacecrafts, will be responsible for curating the collated material along with NASA and online voters, the Verge reported.


Study links nearsightedness to higher education

Study links nearsightedness to higher educationWashington, June 27 - A new study has revealed that that attaining a higher level of education and spending more years in school are two factors associated with a greater prevalence and severity of nearsightedness, or myopia.

According to German researchers, environmental factors may outweigh genetics in myopia development and suggested that students should spend time outdoors.


Now, just pinprick of blood could provide astronauts with correct medical diagnosis

Astronauts SuitsWashington, June 27 - ESA is building a prototype tester for crews on the International Space Station to provide diagnoses within a few minutes from a pinprick of blood.

The ultimate device will offer rapid health checks and results for scientific research.

The droplet is placed on a portable device built around a disc like a mini-DVD. The disc is set spinning to separate the sample into plasma and serum for a whole range of simultaneous tests.

On the ground, there are already numerous applications - the automated laboratory unit covers illnesses such as heart disease, prostate cancer, diabetes and liver disease.


Chimps prefer African, Indian tunes over strong beats of Western music

Chimps prefer African, Indian tunes over strong beats of Western musicWashington, June 27 - Researchers have claimed that chimpanzees prefer listening to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India over strong beats of Western music.

Study co-author Frans de Waal, PhD, of Emory University, said their objective was not to find a preference for different cultures' music and that they used cultural music from Africa, India and Japan to pinpoint specific acoustic properties.

When African and Indian music was played near their large outdoor enclosures, the chimps spent significantly more time in areas where they could best hear the music.


Crops grown on 'land-grabbed' areas could help feed about 300 million people: Study

Crops grown on 'land-grabbed' areas could help feed about 300 million people: StudyWashington, June 27 - Researchers have claimed that crops grown on "land-grabbed" areas in developing countries could have the potential to feed an extra 100 million people worldwide. The improved infrastructure brought about by foreign investment could increase the productivity of subsistence farmlands in countries such as Indonesia and Papua New Guinea and could mean these lands can feed at least 300 million people around the world. This is compared to about 190 million people that could be fed if the land was left tended to by the local population.


Now, 'cheap' water-based organic battery that's eco-friendly too

Now, 'cheap' water-based organic battery that's eco-friendly tooWashington, June 26 - Researchers have developed a water-based organic battery that is long lasting, built from cheap, eco-friendly components.

The new battery - which uses no metals or toxic materials - is intended for use in power plants, where it can make the energy grid more resilient and efficient by creating a large-scale means to store energy for use as needed.

Sri Narayan, professor of chemistry at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and corresponding author of the paper, said the batteries last for about 5,000 recharge cycles, giving them an estimated


Tightly packed trio of black holes discovered

Tightly packed trio of black holes discoveredWashington, June 26 - Astronomers have discovered three closely orbiting supermassive black holes in a galaxy more than 4 billion light years away.

This is the tightest trio of black holes known to date and is remarkable since most galaxies have just one at their center (usually with a mass between 1 million to 10 billion times that of the Sun).


Curiosity traversing ancient glaciers on Red Planet

Curiosity traversing ancient glaciers on Red PlanetWashington, June 26 - NASA has revealed that the Martian crater Gale, through which the NASA rover Curiosity is currently traversing, was covered with glaciers about 3,500 million years ago.

Very cold liquid water also flowed through its rivers and lakes on the lower-lying areas, forming landscapes similar to those which can be found in Iceland or Alaska. This is reflected in an analysis of the images taken by the spacecraft orbiting the red planet.


NASA maps much larger solar atmosphere than previously observed

NASA maps much larger solar atmosphere than previously observedWashington, June 26 - NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory ( STEREO), has mapped a vast atmosphere of solar particles surrounding the sun, through which magnetic fields swarm, solar flares erupt, and gigantic columns of material rise, fall and jostle each other around.

Now, using NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, scientists have found that this atmosphere, called the corona, is even larger than thought, extending out some 5 million miles above the sun's surface-the equivalent of 12 solar radii.


Neanderthals ate vegetables too!

Neanderthals ate vegetables too!Washington, June 26 - Researchers have claimed that Neanderthal diet while heavy on meat, also included plant tissues, such as tubers and nuts.

Scientists from MIT and the University of La Laguna in Spain identified human fecal remains from El Salt, a known site of Neanderthal occupation in southern Spain that dates back 50,000 years.


ESA considering harpooning space debris

ESA considering harpooning space debrisWashington, June 25 - Faced with the challenge of capturing tumbling satellites to clear key orbits, ESA is considering harpooning them.

Decades of launches have left Earth surrounded by a halo of space junk: more than 17,000 trackable objects larger than a coffee cup, threatening working missions with catastrophic collision. Even a 1 cm nut could slam into a valuable satellite with the force of a hand grenade.


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