Research

'Princess Leia' brainwaves help store day memories: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : While sleeping at night, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain and are responsible for forming associations between different aspects of a day's memories, found The Salk Institute scientists.

The circular on the surface of your head might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia, says a study published in journal eLife.

"The scale and speed of Princess Leia waves in the cortex is unprecedented, a discovery that advances the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative," says Terrence Sejnowski, THE head of Salk's Computational Neurobiology Laboratory.

Gulp of red wine before smoking prevents vascular injury

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : Red wine helps prevent cardiovascular disease and drinking a glass or two of it, before lighting up a cigarette, can counteract some of the short-term negative effects of smoking on blood vessels, says a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

Cigarette smoke causes acute endothelial damage, vascular and systemic inflammation, and cellular aging. Red wine stimulates the formation of endothelium-dependent relaxation factors such as nitric oxide, which improve endothelial function in coronary arteries possibly because of the high phenol concentration in red wine.

Your pessimistic attitude can kill you, says study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : A recent study published in journal BMC Public Health has found that pessimism is associated with risk of death from coronary heart disease (CHD).

People with high levels of pessimism seemed to have a higher risk of CHD-induced mortality, even after adjusting for known physiological risk factors whereas optimism did not seem to have any effect on that risk, found the researchers at the Department of Psychiatry, Paijat-Hame Central Hospital, Finland.

Optimism and pessimism in the scientific sense focus on people's attitude towards their future, whether or not they generally expect a greater number of desirable or undesirable things to happen.

Black women face greater risk of breast cancer than whites: Study

Black women face greater risk of breast cancer than whites: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : Black African women are more likely to be diagnosed with late stage breast cancer than white women in England , a new analysis by the Cancer Research UK and Public Health England has found.

Twenty five per cent of Black African women and 22 per cent of Black Caribbean women diagnosed with breast cancer are picked up at stage three and four. This compares to thirteen per cent of white British women.

This is the first time data on more specific ethnic groups and their stage at diagnosis from across England has been routinely released, helping to build a clearer picture of who is diagnosed at an early or late stage.

Nerve growth protein help maintain blood sugar: Study

Nerve growth protein help maintain blood sugar: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : A recent study shows that protein that regulates the development of nerve cells also helps in prompting cells in the pancreas to release insulin, a hormone that helps to maintain a normal level of blood sugar, says a study.

The research is potentially relevant to type-2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease.

In type-1 diabetes, which can appear at any time of life, the body makes insulin, but is either not releasing enough of it or not using the regulatory chemical efficiently to control blood sugar. In type-1 diabetes, which appears in childhood, an immune response gone awry destroys the body's ability to produce insulin altogether.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attack risk

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attack risk

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : A recent study has found that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, but have not had a heart attack or stroke previously.

Drugs that lower fat levels in the blood, called statins, were effective in reducing risk of death, heart attacks and strokes, across a broad range of patient groups.

The benefits were largest in people at highest risk for heart attacks and strokes but those at lower risk also realized some preventive benefits.

Scientists discover details about dinosaur-era birds' feather

Scientists discover details about dinosaur-era birds' feather

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : If you are curious about the birds of dinosaur-era then there is good news as the scientists have recently discovered a new bohaiornithid bird specimen from the Early Cretaceous Period of China with remarkably preserved feathers.

Bohaiornithid birds belonged to enantiornithes, a group of avian dinosaurs that lived millions of years ago.

Our current knowledge of prehistoric plumage is limited, but the new findings provide valuable insights related to structure and colouration.

Pesticide exposure leads to changes in oral microbiome: Study

Pesticide exposure leads to changes in oral microbiome: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A recent study has found that pesticide exposure in farm workers from agricultural communities is linked with changes in the oral microbiome.

In the study, the investigators sampled oral swabs from 65 farm workers and 52 non-farm worker adults from the Yakima Valley (Washington) community agricultural cohort during the spring and summer (2005), when farm workers can undergo high pesticide exposures while working in recently sprayed orchards, thinning the fruit and pruning; and during winter (2006), when exposures are quite low.

Concurrently, they measured blood levels of organophosphate pesticides in the study subjects.

Rehabilitation post heart surgery reduces risk of death

Rehabilitation post heart surgery reduces risk of death

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A recent study has found that cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery helps the patient to deal with depression and significantly reduces the risk of death.

Depression has been known to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes, but if patients who are depressed attend cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery, their risk of death is significantly reduced, according to the study.

The study, conducted by researchers at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, found that patients who were moderately to severely depressed had a higher risk of death after cardiovascular surgery than patients with mild to no depression.

Competitive male species adapt faster to climate change

Competitive male species adapt faster to climate change

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A new study has found that sexually selected species can adapt faster to new environments, and are less likely to go extinct.

According to the study, showy ornaments used by the male of the species in competition for mates, such as the long tail of a peacock or shaggy mane of a lion, could indicate a species' risk of decline in a changing climate.

Healthy lifestyle reduces even genetic heart attack risk

Healthy lifestyle reduces even genetic heart attack risk

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A recent study has found that even among those at high genetic risk, following a healthy lifestyle can cut in half the probability of a heart attack or similar event.

It is a well known fact that following a healthy lifestyle, not smoking, avoiding excess weight and exercising regularly can keep one away from risk of heart disease.

But what about people who have inherited gene variants known to increase risk?

"The basic message of our study is that DNA is not destiny," says Sekar Kathiresan.

"Many individuals - both physicians and members of the general public -- have looked on genetic risk as unavoidable, but for heart attack that does not appear to be the case."

Two differing medications safe for patient undergoing heart procedure

Two differing medications safe for patient undergoing heart procedure

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : According to a new study, two differing blood clot prevention medications are safe and effective for patients undergoing a non-surgical procedure to open blood vessels narrowed by plaque buildup.

The scientific community has proposed both medications as potentially superior to longer-term anticoagulation treatments for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

The new study sought to discover which of the two short-term treatment methods --using the drug heparin combined with a short-term (less than six hours) infusion of tirofiban, or short-term periprocedural bivalirudin, another medication that helps prevent blood clots during the procedure -- was more effective.

Spinal surgery improves sex life-related pain: Study

Spinal surgery improves sex life-related pain: Study

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : A recent study has found that surgery is more effective in reducing pain for patients with degenerative spinal disease, compared to nonsurgical treatment. The spinal surgery also helps in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity.

"Sex life is a relevant consideration for the majority of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis," notes Dr. Shane Burch. "Operative treatment leads to improved sex life-related pain," in addition to reducing pain and disability from degenerative spinal conditions.

Skipping breakfast, insufficient sleep increases risk of obesity

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : According to a new research, child obesity is linked to multiple factors such as mothers smoking in pregnancy, children skipping breakfast and not having a regular bedtime or sufficient sleep.

All three issues appear to be important factors in predicting whether a child will become overweight or obese. Since they are early life factors, they can be modified and the research highlights the possibility that prompt intervention could curb the growth in childhood obesity.

Being overweight or obese is linked to a child having poorer mental health, which can extend into adolescence and adulthood. This poorer psychosocial well-being includes low self-esteem, unhappiness as well as risky behaviours such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption.

Food-allergic students feel vulnerable in college

Food-allergic students feel vulnerable in college

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : In a recent study it was found that most colleges don't have integrated systems in place to support food-allergic students.

"Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" says food allergy researcher Ruchi Gupta. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs."

The study found that while these students don't want to be defined by their allergies, they value feeling safe. They are willing to work with school officials to create more education around what administrators and other students need to know about food allergies.

Scouting helps in better mental health in later life: Study

Scouting helps in better mental health in later life: Study

Washington D.C. [USA] Nov. 10 : Taking part in the scouts and guides not only help you in physical, mental and spiritual development, but also lower the risk of mental illness in later life.

A study by the University of Edinburgh suggests that children, who participate in the organizations, which aim to develop qualities such as self-reliance, resolve and a desire for self-learning, are likely to have better mental health in middle age.

Such activities, which frequently involve being outdoors, also seem to remove the relatively higher likelihood of mental illness in those from poorer backgrounds, the results showed.

Male chimps spends time in grooming offspring: Study

Male chimps spends time in grooming offspring: Study

Washington D.C. [USA] Nov. 9: A recent study has found that male chimpanzees are more concerned about their own offspring than previously thought.

The research suggested that the male, associated with mothers of their offspring early in infancy and interacted with their infants more than expected.

The study comes on the backdrop of question that whether male chimpanzees could recognize their offspring.

Because males spending time with nursing mothers did not increase the likelihood that they would be the father of that mother's next infant, the findings support the paternal effort hypothesis, in which males associate more with mothers in order to protect their offspring, rather than curry favor with the female.

Women have sharper memory than men: Study

Women have sharper memory than men: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 9 : Proving the notion wrong, that man are more intelligent and have sharper memory, a recent study found that middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures.

However, the research further suggested that the memory of women declines as she enter post-menopause. Women report increased forgetfulness and "brain fog" during the menopause transition.

In addition, women are disproportionately at risk for memory impairment and dementia compared with men. Despite these conditions working against them, middle-aged women still outscore their similarly aged male counterparts on all memory measures, according to the study.

Child's academic performance linked to gestational age

Child's academic performance linked to gestational age

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 8 : How your child performs in school has got a strong link with his/her gestational age, finds a recent study.

The study indicates that being born either too early or too late is likely to affect their academic performance.

The risk of cognitive and developmental problems in premature infants is well-established, but preventing preterm birth is limited clinically. By contrast, less is known about what happens to cognitive performance in children born post-term, or about the influence of birth weight variations within post-term populations, where there may be more scope for intervention.

Gold nanoparticles helps in delivering drugs into cancer cells

Gold nanoparticles helps in delivering drugs into cancer cells

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 8 : A recent research found that gold nanoparticles helps in delivering a drug right into the heart of cancer cells,

According to the new laboratory research, transferring effective drugs into cancer cells, particularly to where the chromosomes are stored, was one of the biggest hurdles in treating cancer. Gold nano-particles have proven to be well suited to being absorbed into cells, safely delivering drugs that could otherwise be blocked.

Researchers have been working on better ways to transport a drug directly into the control room of cancer cells, where the chromosomes are kept. This specific drug targets a molecule - telomerase - that builds up the protective caps at the end of chromosomes called telomeres.




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