Asthma

Asthma associated with higher suicidal thoughts with attempts

Washington, AsthmaMay 13: Suicidal behaviour is a grim personality trait that reflects self-destructive mental condition.


Obesity can worsen the impact of asthma

Washington, AsthmaMay 2: The deadly effects of obesity are well known. And now you can add another negative effect – the condition can severely worsen the impact of asthma.

What’s more, it may also mask its severity in standard tests, according to researchers in New Zealand.


Kids living in tree-lined streets less prone to asthma

London, AsthmaMay 1: Living in tree-lined streets will not only provide kids a soothing environment, but will also lower their rates of developing asthma, reveals a new research.

Researchers indicated that children who live in streets with trees running parallel have lower rates of asthma, reports British Medical Journal.


Asthma drug may help restore lost sense of smell

AsthmaLondon, April 17: A medicine prescribed to asthmatics may help restore the sense of smell among people with "hyposmia", a reduced ability to detect and recognise odours, according to a new study.


Researchers identify gene mutation that increases asthma risk

AsthmaWashington, Apr 10: Researchers at the University of Chicago have found that a variant of the gene, known as CHI3L1, is responsible for an increased risk of asthma, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and decline in lung function.

While the gene variant usually leads to increased blood levels of YKL-40, which is a biomarker for asthma, a somewhat different genetic variant of the same gene causes lower levels of YKL-40 and in turn renders protection against asthma.


Early exposure to traffic exhaust linked to asthma, allergies in kids

AsthmaWashington, April 10: A new study has shown that children who are exposed to high levels of air pollution during their first year of life are at an increased risk of developing asthma, pollen allergies, and impaired respiratory function.

However, the study, conducted under the BAMSE project, also found that genetic factors are also at play.

The BAMSE project monitored 4,000 children in Stockholm county for the study.


A bit of aspirin every other day may help women keep asthma at bay

AsthmaLondon, March 13: A new study has found that a small dose of aspirin on alternate days could cut a woman’s risk of developing asthma.

Previous research has shown the same benefit for men, however this study is the first to demonstrate that aspirin reduces the risk of asthma in women as well.

The findings are based on a massive survey of nearly 40 000 US female healthcare professionals, 45 and older, over 10 years.


Treatment for mild asthma may improve everyday lung function: Study

Treatment for mild asthma may improve everyday lung functionWashington, Mar 11: In a first of its kind study by the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, it was cited that a regular low dose ICS treatment may lead to improved day–to-day lung function in patients with very mild or well-controlled asthma.


Oral therapy may reduce asthmatic symptoms among kids

asthmatic symptoms among kidsWashington, Mar 5 : Researchers at University of Genoa, Italy have suggested that oral therapy may be beneficial in decreasing asthma symptoms and medication use among children.

They reviewed nine studies including 441 patients between 3 to 18 years conducted with the help of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic asthma in children.


Elevated allergen levels in homes associated with asthma

asthmaWashington, Mar 1: Researchers have revealed that exposure to increased allergen levels in home may trigger asthmatic symptoms in allergic individuals.


Laser light may be able to detect asthma

AsthmaWashington, Feb 18: A pioneering technique developed by scientists could help doctors detect respiratory diseases like asthma or cancer with a laser light.

A team at JILA, a joint institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado (CU) at Boulder have developed a technique


Mast cell in lungs could be new target for asthma

Washington, Jan 30: AsthmaA study at Weill Cornell Medical College, has cited that an enzyme, called renin, released by mast cells in the lungs may play a key role in the tightening of airways, a trademark of asthma. The finding may have implications in finding new target for treatment against the condition.


Breastfeeding for first six months helps babies develop asthma ‘tolerance’

AsthmaLondon, Jan 28: A recent study has revealed that breast milk can help in developing tolerance against asthma in the infants.

More than 300 million people globally suffer from allergic asthma and some scientists believe that exposure to allergens, or a lack of exposure, at a very young age may be important in its development.

The team of researchers from the INSERM institute in France conducted the study using a mice model.


Scientists divulge new approach catch autism early

Washington, Jan 25: A new study at University of New South Wales has found that incorporating both psychological and biological factors helps in earlier detection of autism.

The study was related to autistic and Asperger’s disorders, which are characterised by ritualistic behaviours such as counting, tapping, flicking, or repeatedly restating information and compulsive behaviours including as a rigid adherence to routine and a marked resistance to change.


Now, a ‘wearable’ sensor system to investigate causes of asthma attacks

asthma attacksWashington, January 23 : A sensor system developed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) researchers has the capability to carry out continuous monitoring of the air around persons prone to asthma attacks.

The new device, which can be comfortably worn in the pockets of a vest throughout the day and kept at the bedside while sleeping at night, may help researchers understand the causes of asthma attacks.


Now, a ‘wearable’ sensor system to investigate causes of asthma attacks

Washington, January 23: AsthmaA sensor system developed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) researchers has the capability to carry out continuous monitoring of the air around persons prone to asthma attacks.

The new device, which can be comfortably worn in the pockets of a vest throughout the day and kept at the bedside while sleeping at night, may help researchers understand the causes of asthma attacks.


Asthma subtypes’ identification opens the door to 'personalized' therapy

Washington, January 18Asthma: Scientists have made a significant ascent towards the goal of personalizing asthma therapy by identifying different subtypes of the disease, which are based on distinct protein profiles.

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) and their colleagues elsewhere made this advance with the help of state-of-the-art protein screening techniques, which they applied to samples taken from 84 asthmatic volunteers.


Mom’s depression boosts asthma risk in kids

Asthma risk in kidsWashington, Jan 16: A new study at the University of Manitoba, Canada, has found that kids whose mothers suffer prolonged depression or anxiety have a higher rate of asthma than their peers, independent of other risk factors for the increasingly common respiratory condition.


Immune cell protein may stop allergic reactions leading to asthma

AsthmaWashington, Jan 3: Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center have found that activating a protein called Siglec-8, which is present on some immune cells, may be the key to stopping allergic reactions that lead to asthma.


Farm women exposed to pesticides at greater risk of asthma

AsthmaWashington, Dec 28 : Farm women, who are exposed to some commonly used pesticides in farm work are at a greater risk of developing allergic asthma, according to a new study.

Researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences said that though a large number of farm women are in contact with pesticides, there’s very little information about the potential risks.


Common antibiotic may help treat patients with difficult asthma

Washington, Dec 18: A collaborative study has shown that a commonly available antibiotic, macrolide, can improve the quality of life of patients with difficult asthma, and may also generate significant health care savings.


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