Cancer

Gene thought to promote cancer suppresses it instead

Washington, July 8: In a surprising study, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that a protein previously believed to promote colorectal cancer, TCF7L2, instead suppresses the growth of human cancer cells.

“This finding reshapes a fundamental model of how colorectal cancer arises,” said Dr. Lawrence Lum, assistant professor of cell biology at UT Southwestern and senior author of the study, which appears online today and in a future issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Red wine can keep breast cancer at bay

Washington, July 7 : A new study has shown that resveratrol, a chemical commonly found in red wine may help prevent breast cancer.

During the study, Eleanor G. Rogan, Ph. D., a professor in the Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and colleagues measured the effect of resveratrol on cellular functions known to contribute to breast cancer.

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Cases of new, deadly form of cancer on the rise: Study

Washington, July 7 : Researchers at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have found that the incidence of mantle cell lymphoma, a deadly form of non-Hodgkin''s lymphoma, is on the rise.

Writing about their findings in the journal CANCER, the researchers have revealed that this disease is most frequently striking men, Caucasians and older individuals.

The study has also revealed that most patients are diagnosed with advanced stages of the disease.

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Treatment delays can worsen outcomes for men with breast cancer

Washington,Breast Cancer July 7: A new study has revealed that delayed treatments can worsen the outcomes for men with breast cancer.

According to Dr. Marina Garassino from the Orion Collaborative Group, men are often diagnosed with breast cancer when the disease reaches its advanced stage.

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Eating mushrooms can help boost immunity, fight cancer

WashingtonMushrooms, July 5: Mushrooms are rich in antioxidants, nutrients, and vitamins that may help fight cancer, say researchers.

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Soon, a non-invasive tool to monitor lung cancer treatment progress

London,Lung Cancer July 4: Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Centre in Boston are developing a blood test that would help in monitoring lung cancer progression by detecting tumour cells circulating in the bloodstream.

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Organic body care products ‘contaminated’ with cancer-causing chemical

Cancer Stem CellsWashington, July 1 : Body care products with labels claiming them to be "100 per cent natural" and "Pure and Organic" may not be as safe as believed, for a new study has found several soaps and lotions to be contaminated with a cancer-causing chemical.

"We literally are bathing ourselves in chemicals every day," the Environmental News Network quoted Adam Eidinger of the Organic Consumers Association as saying.

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Cancer cure in mice to get human trials

Washington, June 30: A potential cure for cancer that destroyed advanced tumours in mice is to be tested on human patients for the first time by scientists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

The treatment will transfuse specific white blood cells, called granulocytes, into patients with advanced forms of cancer. The granulocytes will come from healthy young people with immune systems that produce cells that have high levels of anti-cancer activity.

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Chocolate may help prevent bowel cancer

London, June 27: Now, chocoholics have a justified reason to savour their favourite sweet, for a new study has found that eating chocolate can help stop bowel cancer.

Scientists say that the key is a naturally-occurring chemical in chocolate.

Tests on a man-made version of the chemical showed it halved the rate at which tumours grew, leaving healthy cells untouched.

The man-made creation is a copy of procyanidins, a class of molecules thought to protect the body’s healthy cells.

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Biomarkers that may help predict prostate cancer recurrence identified

Washington, June 27: Scientists from University of Texas Southwestern have identified seven biomarkers that may help predict prostate cancer recurrence in patients after surgery.

Biomarkers are proteins circulating in a patient’s blood that are specific to a disease.

Currently used risk assessment methods can predict prostate cancer recurrence with about 70 percent accuracy.

Dr Shahrokh Shariat, now a resident in urology at UT Southwestern revealed that with these newly identified biomarkers he was able to predict recurrence and progression with 86 percent accuracy.

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Dogs can sniff ovarian cancer's specific scent

Washington, June 27: Dogs can detect ovarian cancer’s specific scent, researchers from the University Hospital in Goteborg, Sweden, have found.

However, it's not clear whether they respond to the cancer itself or odors associated with cancer.

The finding was made in a research, which explored whether ovarian cancer has a scent different from other cancers and whether working dogs could be taught to distinguish it in its different stages.

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Promising cancer drug target in prostate tumors identified

London, Prostate CancerJune 27: Researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute claim to have identified a promising cancer drug target in prostate tumors.

The scientists report they have blocked the development of prostate tumors in cancer-prone mice by knocking out a molecular unit they describe as a "powerhouse" that drives runaway cell growth.

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Laser ‘microscalpel’ could improve precision of cancer, epilepsy surgeries

Washington, June 25: The precision of surgeries for cancer, epilepsy and other diseases could soon improve, thanks to a mechanical engineering Assistant Professor at The University of Texas at Austin, who has developed a laser "microscalpel" that destroys a single cell while leaving nearby cells intact.

Adela Ben-Yakar said that scientists can now remove a cell with high precision in 3-D without damaging the cells above and below it.

“And you can see, with the same precision, what you are doing to guide your microsurgery,” he said.

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Idle computer time can help contribute to global cancer fight

Washington, June 24: A concept called "grid computing," developed by a biomedical engineering professor at The University of Texas at Austin, would enable an average person to contribute idle computer time in a global effort to fight cancer.

Already Cellular Environment in Living Systems @Home or CELS@Home, developed by Muhammad Zaman, has over 1, 000 computer users round the world who are donating towards the project, and the figures continue to grow.

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Low socio-economic status raises risk of death after cancer diagnosis

Washington, June 23 : Cancer patients with low socio-economic status are at a greater risk of dying after cancer diagnosis, according to a new study.

The research led by Tim Byers, M. D. of the University of Colorado Denver found that cancer patients with low socio-economic status (SES) have more advanced cancers at diagnosis, receive less aggressive treatment, and have a higher risk of dying in the five years following cancer diagnosis.

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Blood test and symptom screening boosts early detection of ovarian cancer

Ovarian Cancer RibbonWashington, June 23 : A simple blood test, along with screening of recent-onset symptoms linked to ovarian cancer, will now be able to improve the early detection of ovarian cancer by 20 percent, according to new findings by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Symptoms linked to ovarian cancer include abdominal or pelvic pain, difficulty eating or feeling full quickly and abdominal bloating.

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More exercise, better diet turns off cancer causing genes

Regular exercise is natural pain reliever for arthritis patientsLondon, June 19 : Leading a healthy lifestyle with right food and regular exercise can significantly inhibit prostate cancer progression by turning off genes that cause it, suggests a new study.

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Biomarkers that may help predict prostate cancer recurrence identified

Washington, June 18: Scientists from University of Texas Southwestern have identified seven biomarkers that may help predict prostate cancer recurrence in patients after surgery.

Biomarkers are proteins circulating in a patient’s blood that are specific to a disease.

Currently used risk assessment methods can predict prostate cancer recurrence with about 70 percent accuracy.

Dr Shahrokh Shariat, now a resident in urology at UT Southwestern revealed that with these newly identified biomarkers he was able to predict recurrence and progression with 86 percent accuracy.

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Personalized cancer therapy one step closer to reality

Cancer Stem CellsWashington, June 17 : Combining new molecular imaging techniques with targeted therapy may give cancer patients a more individualized treatment that can increase the effectiveness of therapies and minimize treatment discomfort.

In traditional radioimmunoimaging (RAII), radioisotopes are linked directly to antibodies and are delivered together to tumour targets.

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New inhibitors of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells identified

Washington, Breast CancerJune 17: Researchers from University of Illinois, Colorado and North Carolina have identified some compounds that may inhibit the growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells, thus opening up new avenues for developing new drugs.

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Human trials start on new liver cancer treatment

Singapore - Liver CancerResearchers have started human trials on a new way to treat an advanced form of liver cancer, a published report said Monday.

Doctors at Singapore's National Cancer Centre (NCC) said that the method is a combination of existing treatments including the injection of a radioactive particle into the tumour to help patients with cancers that are too advanced for surgery.

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Testosterone replacement in older men doesn’t elevate prostate cancer risk

Washington, Prostate CancerJune 16: Older men opting for testosterone replacement therapy, owing to their low testosterone levels, don’t face an elevated risk of prostate cancer, says a new study.

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Chocolate can actually keep you cancer free

Chocolate can actually keep you cancer freeWashington, June 14 : Now, chocoholics have a justified reason to savour their favourite sweet – a new study has found that a synthetic chemical based on a compound found in cocoa beans slows growth and accelerates destruction of human tumors.

Laboratory studies suggested that the cocoa chemical should be tested further for cancer chemoprevention or even treatment, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center.

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Flip-flops can give you skin cancer, warn doctors

London, JSkin Cancerune 13: They’re the latest fad, and the coolest footwear in the hot summer season, giving you the much desired casual look, but according to experts, the much-loved flip-flops can put people at risk of developing skin cancer on their feet.

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Cell phones may revolutionize cancer care for young patients

Cell phones may revolutionize cancer care for young patientsWashington, June 11 : Young cancer patients would now be able to manage side-effects of chemotherapy with the help of cell phones, thanks to British researchers, who have developed specially adapted mobile phones on which the patients can record and send details of all their symptoms to the medical professionals managing their care.

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