Cancer

Oral sex causing small-scale throat cancer epidemic

Melbourne, June 10 : Growing prevalence of oral sex may be leading to an increased incidence of throat cancer, according to a new study.

In the study, a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV), contracted through oral sex, was found to be a much stronger risk factor than tobacco or alcohol use.

With 6,000 cases per year and an annual increase of up to 10 per cent in men younger than 60, some researchers believe that the HPV-linked throat cancers could overtake cervical cancer in the next decade.

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Cervical cancer rates soaring among teens

Cervical Cancer CellLondon, June 10 : Incidence of cervical cancer among teenagers has seen a significant increase over the past few years, and is still increasing, suggests a new study.

The study led by Jillian Birch from the University of Manchester, UK, has revealed that the incidence of cervical cancer between 1979 and 2003 has increased by 1.6 pct per year.

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Active men less likely to die from cancer

London, May 28 : Men who take regular moderate exercise are at a reduced risk of dying from cancer than couch potatoes, according to a new study by Swedish researchers.

The team found that the cancer death rate in active men who walked or cycled at least 30 minutes daily fell by a third.

The authors said that active men have a 34 per cent lower chance of being killed by cancer than those who do not, reports the Scotsman.

The researchers monitored the health and physical activity levels of 40,708 men aged 45 and 79 for seven years.

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Coffee, tea don’t raise breast cancer risk

cancer cellNew Delhi, May 27 : A new study has revealed that coffee and tea do not increase the risk of developing breast cancer.

The study led by Dr. Davaasambuu Ganmaa from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts analysed coffee, tea, and caffeine intake among 85,987 women, who were a part of Nurses' Health Study and were between 30 and 55 years of age at the start of the study.

Over the 22-year period, 5,272 women developed breast cancer.

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Scientists develop non-surgical photodynamic therapy for cancer

modified photodynamic therapyWashington, May 24 : British scientists from the Peninsula Medical School in Cornwall have made a breakthrough in cancer treatment by developing a modified photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment that can destroy cancer cells without harming the surrounding tissue.

A cream is applied directly to skin cancers and pre-cancers, which naturally produces a photosensitive drug.

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Adding rosemary to your hamburger could help prevent cancer

Washington, May 24: Apart from adding flavour to meat, there’s another reason to use rosemary – cancer prevention.

Scientists have found that adding the seasoning to hamburgers and meat may protect against cancer onset.

J. Scott Smith, a KSU food science professor at Kansas State University has advised that applying rosemary seasoning to hamburgers can break up the potentially cancer-causing compounds formed when the meat is cooked.

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Persistent HPV infection may be clinical marker for cervical cancer

Washington, May 22: Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill report that persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) could be a useful clinical marker for increased risk of cervical cancer.

HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that can cause high-grade cervical lesions, increasing a woman’s risk of developing invasive cervical cancer.

Presently, Pap smear tests are widely used in screening programs aimed at detecting changes in the cervix before a cancer develops.

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Too much beer may prompt pancreatic cancer onset

Washington, BeerMay 22: There may be nothing more refreshing downing chilled bottles of beer on a summer afternoon, but you had better be careful about the amount of the drink you guzzle, for a new study suggests that too much beer can actually speed up the onset of pancreatic cancer.

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Cancer drug may help heart-lung disease patients

cancer DrugWashington, May 20 : A drug developed to fight cancer may prove effective in treating patients with heart-lung disease, says a new study.

Researchers from the University of Chicago have suggested that the cancer drug known as sorafenib (Nexavar(r)) has shown the potential for treating pulmonary hypertension.

The human trials of the drug showed eight out of the first nine patients increased their ability to exercise.

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Blood test may catch lung cancer in earliest stages

Washington, Lung CancerMay 20: A team of scientists, including a researcher of Indian origin, at the University of Pennsylvania has found that a simple blood test might be able to detect lung cancer in its earliest stages with unprecedented accuracy.

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Traditional herbal medicine may help fight pancreatic cancer

Washington, Pancreatic CancerMay 20: Researchers at the Kimmel Cancer at Jefferson in Philadelphia have found that a herb used in traditional medicine by many Middle Eastern countries might help in the fight against pancreatic cancer.

They found that thymoquinone, an extract of nigella sativa seed oil, blocked pancreatic cancer cell growth and killed the cells by enhancing the process of programmed cell death.

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Antidepressants may cut depression risk in head and neck cancer patients

Washington, DepressionMay 20: A pilot study has found that antidepressants can considerably reduce the risk of depression for head and neck cancer patients.

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center showed that only 15 percent of head and neck cancer patients who took antidepressants as part of their treatment experienced depression.

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New data show finasteride helps prevent prostate cancer

Prostate CancerWashington, May 19 : Men and their doctors should consider a more aggressive approach that includes finasteride to prevent the development of prostate cancer, according to a comprehensive re-evaluation of the largest prostate cancer prevention study.

This study also highlights the role of prostate specific antigen (PSA) scores in treatment decision-making.

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Gene screening may help catch skin cancer early

London, Skin CancerMay 19: The results of three studies suggest that gene screening may help detect persons who are most likely to contract skin cancer after sitting in the sun.

While studying patients with melanoma and other types of skin cancer, researchers in Iceland and Australia identified a gene linked to a person’s skin tone as well as his/her chances of getting skin cancer.

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Scientists identify biosensor for measuring “oxidative stress” status of cells

Molecular Responses to OxidativeLondon, May 17 : Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have identified a molecule, the level of which in a cell may reveal the “oxidative stress” status of the cell.

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Simple blood test may improve treatment response in breast cancer patients

Washington, Blood TestMay 16: Doctors’ dependence on radiology studies such as CT scans and ultrasound for breast cancer therapy could soon become passe, thanks to researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center, who have developed a simple blood test to reliably assess treatment response in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

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Carbon-coated nanomagnets could serve as potential hyperthermia agents

HyperthermiaWashington, May 15 : A new research has suggested that carbon-coated nanomagnets could serve as a safe and effective hyperthermia agent, targeting and destroying cancerous cells.

Researchers from Germany found that nanoparticles consisting of metallic iron with a protective carbon coat could be potential hyperthermia agents.

In animal models, using heat to selectively kill tumor cells has proven efficient.

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Arsenic-based agent may offer potential blood cancer therapy

blood cancerLondon, May 13 : A team of experts led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have found that an arsenic-based agent used in traditional Chinese medicine may help eliminate leukaemia initiating cells (LICs), which are impervious to conventional chemotherapy and undaunted by targeted cancer therapies.

Scientifically, the arsenic-based agent the researchers have identified is known as As2O3.

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Gene that regulates body size may harbour cancer cure

Washington, May 13: A new study by Sunnybrook researchers has found that a gene called glypican-3 (GPC3) plays a major role in regulating body size – a discovery that may have implications for the development of novel therapies for a number of cancers.

Researchers have discovered the mechanism by which the loss of the GPC3 gene triggers overgrowth through certain growth factors such as Sonic Hedgehog, which stimulate cancer growth.

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Physical activity may prevent breast cancer in some women

London, Breast CancerMay 13: A new study has found that women who engage in physical activity are 25 per cent less likely to develop breast cancer.

However, researchers also discovered that certain groups are more likely to see these benefits than others.

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Soon, Oz women to get breast cancer 'hair x-ray' test

Melbourne, Breast CancerMay 12: A new test that diagnoses breast cancer by X-raying a woman's hair has been developed, and it will be available in Australia later this year.

Sydney-based company Fermiscan has developed the test, and have already tested it on 2,000 Aussie women.

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Indian scientist discovers significant cancer gene

London, May 9: A research team, led by an Indian scientist, has identified a gene that causes cancer.

Cancer biologist Shrikant Anant and colleagues at the OU Cancer Institute have found that the gene RBM3 can cause cells to become cancerous and cause cancer cells to die.

The gene and its protein, both called RBM3, are vital for cell division in normal cells. In cancers, low oxygen levels in the tumours cause the amount of this protein to go up dramatically. This causes cancer cells to divide uncontrollably, leading to increased tumour formation.

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Four drinks a day boosts cancer risks

WineMelbourne, May 8: Drinking just four standard alcoholic drinks a day significantly increases a man's chances of developing breast, bowel, throat and mouth cancer, a new study has found.

A report by the Cancer Institute NSW in Australia has found that for men, four standard alcoholic drinks a day increased their risk of developing bowel cancer by 64 per cent.

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Growth rates of breast cancer tumours faster in younger women

Breast CancerWashington, May 8: A new approach to estimate tumour growth, developed by scientists at the Department of Etiological Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, has indicated that the growth of breast cancer tumours is faster in younger women as compared to older women.

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Researchers develop new laser treatment for vocal-cord cancer

Washington, Vocal-cord cancerMay 7: Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have reported the successful development of an innovative laser treatment for early vocal-cord cancer.

The treatment, which has now been used in more than 25 patients, effectively restores patients’ voices without radiotherapy or traditional surgery, which can permanently damage vocal quality.

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