Health

3D structure of 'causative agent' of malaria constructed

3D structure of 'causative agent' of malaria constructedWashington D.C., Jan. 15 : Providing valuable knowledge for the design of anti-malaria drugs, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) reconstructed the 3D structure of one of the proteins of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria and the antibodies that act as the first line of defence against the parasite.


Chronic brain damage not as prevalent in NFL players as believed

Chronic brain damage not as prevalent in NFL players as believedWashington, June 26 - Researchers have said that chronic brain damage may not be as prevalent in NFL players as thought.


Believe it! Tumour removed from under the nail

TumourNew York, Feb 8 - Ever heard of a tumour under a fingernail? Even the man who has been diagnosed with one didn't believe it.

The man, in his 40s, noticed a dark line under his nail after an injury, which he assumed was a splinter.

But the mark remained in the same place for three years without changing, according to media reports.


Now, online database of disease genes that could be targeted with drugs

Now, online database of disease genes that could be targeted with drugsWashington, Oct. 14 - Researchers have created a comprehensive database that matches thousands of disease genes with approved or experimental drugs that target those genes.

Twin brothers Obi Griffith, PhD, and Malachi Griffith , PhD at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis created the online database that matches thousands of genes linked to cancer and other diseases with drugs that target those genes.


Why obese twin is as 'metabolically healthy' as lean co-twin

Why obese twin is as 'metabolically healthy' as lean co-twinWashington, Oct. 7 - A unique study of identical twins with significant weight differences has given out surprising results.

In the study, 16 pairs of identical twins were considered in which one twin is obese.


1 in 3 young women sees eating disorders as desirable

eating-disordersMelbourne, October 7 : Following a review of more than 30 studies on attitudes to eating disorders, a Melbourne researcher has found that up to one in three young women views eating disorders, like bulimia and anorexia, as desirable ways to stay slim.

Rachel Gold, of La Trobe University, indicated that “negative or stigmatising” attitudes towards eating disorders might be stopping some sufferers from seeking treatment.


`Disgusted` rats shed light on why we feel nauseous

Washington, October 7 : University of Guelph scientists believe they’ve found the mechanism in the brain that is responsible for the sensation of nausea – with the help of some “disgusted” rats.

Nausea is a common and distressing side effect of many drugs and treatments. Unlike vomiting, nausea is not well understood.

But the finding by Guelph PhD student Katharine Tuerke, neuroscience researcher Cheryl Limebeer and Prof. Linda Parker in the Department of Psychology may soon change that.


Reducing sperm’s swimming ability could be key to male contraceptive pill

spermSydney, October 7 : Australian researchers may have come closer to developing a male contraceptive pill.

They have discovered a way to cut off the fuel supply to the “motor” that drives human sperm, greatly reducing their swimming ability and opening a new avenue to developing a male pill.

The finding also throws new light on the little-understood reasons for infertility in men, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.


Cell phone use does affect brain but health consequences unknown

 Cell phone use does affect brain but health consequences unknown Washington, Feb 23: A new study has found that increasing use of cell phones is linked to rise in brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity, in the area closest to the phone antenna – however, the clinical significance of this find is not known yet.


Are you an early riser or late sleeper? It’s all in the hair, says study

Are you an early riser or late sleeper? It’s all in the hair, says studyWashington, Aug 24 : Are you an early riser or do you prefer waking up when the sun is overhead? Your hair may be an indicator – says a new study.

According to National Geographic News, that''s because the genes that regulate our body clocks can be found in hair-follicle cells, researchers have discovered.


Keeping busy is the key to happiness

 Keeping busy is the key to happinessWashington, Aug 11 : People who constantly have something to do, even something pointless, are happier than people who sit idly, says a new study.

Christopher K. Hsee and Adelle X. Yang, of the University of Chicago and and Liangyan Wang, of Shanghai Jiaotong University conducted the study.

The obvious reasons are to make a living, earn money or even to help others.


Mechanism behind success of disease-causing microbes identified

 Mechanism behind success of disease-causing microbes identifiedWashington, July 23 : Researchers have identified the mechanism used by several types of common, virulent microbes to infect plants and cause devastating blights.

Microbes using this infection mechanism include fungi that are currently causing wheat rust epidemics in Africa and Asia, and a class of parasitic algae, called oomycetes, that resulted in the Irish potato blight of the
19th Century.


Microbes from Earth likely to contaminate Mars

Microbes from Earth likely to contaminate MarsWashington, April 28 : Bacteria common to spacecraft sent from the Earth may be able to survive the harsh environs of Mars, long enough to contaminate it with terrestrial life, research says.

The search for life on Mars remains a stated goal of NASA's Mars Exploration Program and Astrobiology Institutes.


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