Heart Attack

Study shows anticoagulant drugs have similar outcomes after angioplasty

AngioplastyWashington, March 31: Italian researchers have shown that in heart attack patients who have angioplasty, the anticoagulant drugs abciximab and tirofiban produce similar outcomes for certain cardiac measures within 90 minutes after the procedure.

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Regular doctor-patient communication can lower heart disease risk

Heart AttackWashington, Mar 31:  A new study has revealed that regular communication with doctors can lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

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Chances of heart attack increases for men after prostate cancer diagnoses

Heart AttackWashington, Mar 23 : A new study has suggested that men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer (CaP) are more likely to have a heart attack or what one calls cardio-vascular (CV) morbidity.

It is known that emotional stress is linked to CV morbidity and mortality, such as reported during earthquakes, loss of a child and during world cup soccer matches. Emotional triggers result in physiological responses on the vascular, inflammatory and immune systems.

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Man survives after suffering snakebite, heart attack and coma!

Heart AttackMelbourne, March 7: Snakebite, heart attack and coma – all at the same time - can surely signal the end of a person. But Nick Taft, from Australia, was strong enough to endure this deadly combination and lucky enough to survive it.

The 39-year-old dentist from Queensland was walking down beach track near Noosa, when he was attacked by a 6ft Eastern Brown snake.

The snake wrapped itself around Taft’s left leg, and sank its fangs into his calf.

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Depression boosts death risk for heart attack patients years after attack

Heart AttackWashington, Mar 4: A team led by researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that depression raises risk of death for heart attack patients years after attack.

Previously it was believed that depressed heart attack patients have a higher risk for sudden death in the months following a heart attack. However, the new study has found that the risk continues for many years.

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Loud snoring linked to stroke and heart disease risk

Heart DiseaseLondon, Mar 2: If you’re a loud snorer, then the chances of you suffering from strokes and heart diseases are higher than people who do not snore, say Hungarian scientists.

In a new study, the researchers claim that heavy snorers are 67 percent more likely to suffer strokes.

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Eye disease increases heart attack, stroke risk

Eye disease increases heart attack, stroke riskWashington, Feb 28: Australian researchers have found that Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease increases the risk of death from a heart attack or stroke two fold.

AMD affects the centre of the retina (macula) at the back of the eye that is used for fine central vision tasks, such as reading and driving.

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Common genetic defect raises smokers’ risk of early heart attack

Heart AttackWashington, February 14: A new study has unearthed evidence that a common genetic defect significantly increases a smoker’s risk of an early heart attack.

Dr. Arthur Moss, director of the Heart Research Follow-up Program at the University of Rochester Medical Center, says that as much as 60 to 70 per cent of the population has a gene defect that makes smokers vulnerable to a heart attack.

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HIV drugs Abacavir, Didanosine boost heart attack risk

Washington, Feb 8: Heart AttackA recent study has found that two widely used HIV drugs, Abacavir and Didanosine, can increase the risk of heart attack or formation of blood clots in the heart.

In the Data Collection of Adverse effects of Anti-HIV Drugs Study (D: A: D), the scientists observed the side effects and incidence of heart attack among HIV-infected patients using Stavudine, Zidovudine, Lamivudine, Abacavir and Didanosine.

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Novel drug may reduce heart attack damage

Heart AttackWashington, Feb 8: A new study conducted by the Duke Clinical Research Institute has revealed that a novel drug, known as KAI-9803, might lessen muscle damage from a heart attack.

The findings of the study reflect the first time the drug has been tested in humans.

KAI-9803 blocks the activity of an enzyme called delta protein kinase C that triggers cell and tissue death in the aftermath of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

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Protein that influences heart attack response, cardiac damage identified

London, Feb 1: Heart AttackResearchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered a protein called macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) that influences the cardiac response to the loss of blood flow and oxygen to the heart.

The study revealed that the protein activated an imperative cellular stress response enzyme called AMP-activated protein kinase
(AMPK), which monitored cellular energy balance and shielded from heart attack injury.

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Exciting football games could trigger heart attacks

London, Jan 31: Watching dramatic and exciting games of football could trigger a stress-induced event, especially heart attacks, according to a new study.

In a study conducted during the 2006 World Cup in Germany, researchers reported that men are three times more likely to have heart attacks on days when their national football team is playing in a key match.

The German research team suggested that proper medication and treatment should be given to patients with a known history of heart disease, before letting them watch major football matches.

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Resistant to aspirin raises heart attack risk

Resistant to aspirin raises heart attack riskLondon, Jan 18: A new study has found that patients who are resistant to aspirin are four times more likely to have a heart attack, stroke, or even die from a pre-existing heart condition.

Some patients are prescribed aspirin over the long-term to cut their chance of developing a blood clot, reports BMJ.

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Seven new cholesterol genes identified

Heart DiseaseLondon, Jan 14: An international study led by researchers from the University of Michigan School of Public Health has found seven new genes that influence blood cholesterol levels, a major factor in heart disease.

The researchers also confirmed 11 other genes previously thought to influence cholesterol.

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Study paves way for new treatments of heart disease, diabetes

Heart DiseaseWashington, Jan 11: Heartening news for people who’re trying to reduce bad cholesterol and fatty acid levels. A new study has made a key discovery, which can lead to new drugs to treat and reverse the effects of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease related to obesity.

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Long, intense periods of anxiety hike heart attack risk: Study

Washington, Jan 8: Heart AttackPeople who have intense, long-lasting periods of anxiety might be courting a heart attack, warn researchers.

The study, led by Biing-Jiun Shen, Ph. D., an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, shows that longstanding anxiety markedly increases the risk of heart attack, even when other common risk factors are taken into account.

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Restless Legs May Be A Reason Of Heart Attack

Restless LegsWashington, Jan 1: People with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart disease compared to people without it, says a new study.

The risk is greatest in those with the most frequent and severe symptoms.

The study, led by John W. Winkelman, MD, PhD, with Harvard Medical School in Boston, reviewed 3,433 people with an average age of 68 who were enrolled in the Sleep Heart Health Study.

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Restless legs syndrome doubles stroke, heart disease risk

Heart-AttackWashington, Jan 1: People with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) are twice as likely to have a stroke or heart disease compared to people without it, says a new study.

The risk is greatest in those with the most frequent and severe symptoms.

The study, led by John W. Winkelman, MD, PhD, with Harvard Medical School in Boston, reviewed 3,433 people with an average age of 68 who were enrolled in the Sleep Heart Health Study.

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