Ovarian Cancer

Hormone replacement therapy increases ovarian cancer risk

Hormone replacement therapy increases ovarian cancer risk London, Feb 13 - A new study has revealed that undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can increase ovarian cancer risk by as much as 40 percent.

The research by Oxford University has been welcomed by cancer charities, who are urging more women to study the risks before deciding if they want the treatment, Sky News reported.

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Genetic cause behind rare type of ovarian cancer revealed

Genetic cause behind rare type of ovarian cancer revealedWashington, March 24 - Researchers have uncovered the reason behind rare type of ovarian cancer that most often strikes girls and young women.

The findings revealed a "genetic superhighway" mutation in a gene found in the overwhelming majority of patients with small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type, also known as SCCOHT.

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Ovarian cancer detection made easy with simple symptom survey

Ovarian cancer detection made easy with simple symptom surveyWashington, September 22 : A simple three-question paper-and-pencil survey, given to women in the doctor’s office in less than two minutes, can effectively identify those who are experiencing symptoms that may indicate ovarian cancer, a new study has revealed.

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Recognising early symptoms of ovarian cancer best way to beat disease

 Recognising early symptoms of ovarian cancer best way to beat diseaseWashington, Sept 17 : A new study led by an Indian-origin researcher has claimed that recognising early symptoms of ovarian cancer can assist in early detection of the disease.

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Simple ovarian cancer test to be available in 2-yrs after faulty gene discovery

 Simple ovarian cancer test to be available in 2-yrs after faulty gene discoveryLondon, Aug 8: The "landmark" discovery of a single faulty gene, which increases a woman's risk of ovarian cancer six-fold, has paved the way for a simple a diagnostic test that could be available in two years.

Women with the gene have a one in 11 chance of getting the disease, and they generally have a one in 70 chance of developing it.

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New experimental drug slows down growth of ovarian cancer

New experimental drug slows down growth of ovarian cancerWashington, April 16: A new study has found that an experimental drug that blocks two points of a crucial cancer cell signalling pathway inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cells.

The study at UCLA''s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center performed on mouse models also showed significant increase of survival in mice with ovarian cancer.

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Electronic nose smells cancer

 Electronic nose smells cancerWashington, Dec 21: Scientists have used electronic nose to confirm that ovarian cancer tissue and healthy tissue smell different.

Gyorgy Horvath from the University of Gothenburg, and researchers from the University of Gavle and KTH Royal Institute of Technology conducted the study.

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Potential new target for treatment of ovarian cancer identified

Potential new target for treatment of ovarian cancer identifiedWashington, Aug 17 : Scientists have identified a potential new target for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

For the first time, Salt Inducible Kinase 2 (SIK2) has been found to play a critical role in cell division and to regulate the response of some ovarian cancers to chemotherapy.

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Investigational drug raises hope for ovarian cancer patients

Investigational drug raises hope for ovarian cancer patientsWashington, Sept 16 : Women with recurrent ovarian cancer can be helped by giving an investigational drug in combination with chemotherapy, according to new results presented at the 33rd Congress of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) in Stockholm.

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Researchers find clues to prevent spread of ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancerWashington, Mar 14: A new study in mice conducted by the University of Chicago Medical Center has provided clues to prevent spread of ovarian cancer.

The researchers found that a drug, which blocks production of an enzyme that enables ovarian cancer to gain a foothold in a new site can slow the spread of the disease and prolong survival, only if it is given early in the disease process.

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Scientist suggest new test for accurate diagnosis of ovarian cancer

Ovarian CanceWashington, Mar 11: A researcher from Women & Infants'/Alpert Medical School suggest that testing women suspected of ovarian cancer for a combination of proteins, or biomarkers in the blood called HE4 and CA 125 can provide for an accurate diagnosis of the disease.

Presently, there is no adequate diagnostic test for ovarian cancer. However CA 125 is the only blood test that can be used to help predict a woman’s risk for ovarian cancer.

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Dr. Sood Develops Cure For Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Anil Sood, an Indian-origin researcher and a Professor of Gynecologic Oncology and Cancer Biology in the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, has developed a protein interleukin-8(IL-8) that helps in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

Sood has found out a short interfering RNA (siRNA) product that slashes IL-8 expression, and decreases the size of the tumor by attacking blood supply.

Sood said, “The protein IL-8 is a potential therapeutic target in ovarian cancer.”

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New test detects early stage ovarian cancer with 99 pct accuracy

Ovarian CancerWashington, Feb 13: A team of researchers at Yale School of Medicine has developed a blood test, which has enough sensitivity and specificity to detect early stage ovarian cancer with 99 percent accuracy.

The findings are based on a previous study conducted by Yale School of Medicine in 2005 showing 95 percent effectiveness of a blood test using four proteins.

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How breast and ovarian cancers may become resistant to therapy

London, February 11: Ovarian CancerScientists have discovered that mechanism by which found out breast and ovarian cancers caused by a faulty BRAC2 gene may develop resistance to treatment.

The researchers say that the faulty BRAC2 gene renders cells unable to repair damaged DNA, which can lead to them becoming cancerous.

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