Prostate Cancer

Chemical in water bottle increases prostate cancer risk

Chemical in water bottle increases prostate cancer riskNew York, Jan 8 - Forget about the quality of water. A mere contact with the water bottle can be life-threatening.

A commonly used plasticiser found in products such as water bottles, soup can liners and paper receipts, can increase the risk for prostate cancer later in life, said a study.


Nerve action linked to prostate cancer spread

Nerve action linked to prostate cancer spreadLos Angeles, July 13 : Scientists have found that nerves play a crucial role in both the development and spread of prostate tumours - the second most common form of cancer in men, says a study.


One soft drink per day may raise aggressive prostate cancer risk

One soft drink per day may raise aggressive prostate cancer riskNew York, Nov 28 : Drinking one normal-sized soft drink per day may put men at increased risk of developing more aggressive forms of prostate cancer, according to a Swedish study.

The study found that those who drank one 11-fluid-ounce soft drink a day were 40 percent more likely to develop more serious forms of prostate cancer that required treatment.


Factors that may up men’s risk of dying from prostate cancer revealed

Factors that may up men’s risk of dying from prostate cancer revealedWashington, October 22 : High blood pressure, blood sugar, blood lipids, and body mass index-characteristics that are often lumped together as the metabolic syndrome-may increase risk of dying from prostate cancer, according a new study.


New method detects aggressive prostate cancer

New method detects aggressive prostate cancerWashington, Aug 9 - A new screening method combining a novel drug therapy and changes in prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels can detect an aggressive prostate cancer, despite negative results obtained by biopsies, according to a US study.

Produced by the prostate gland, PSA, found in blood and semen, can be detected by a blood test. Anything higher than four nanograms in a millilitre of blood can indicate prostate cancer.


Circumcision ‘may lower prostate cancer risk’

Circumcision ‘may lower prostate cancer risk’Washington, Mar 12 : Circumcision before a male's first sexual intercourse may help protect against prostate cancer, a new study has found.

The study, conducted by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, suggests that circumcision can hinder infection and inflammation that may lead to this malignancy.


7 DNA regions that influence prostate cancer risk discovered

 7 DNA regions that influence prostate cancer risk discoveredWashington, July 13 : It is well known that men with relatives who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer have an elevated risk of developing this type of cancer.

In 2010, scientists of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) calculated that this risk rises with the number of affected direct family members and also depends on the relatives'' age at outbreak of the disease.


New drug shows promise in stopping prostate cancer spread to bone

 New drug shows promise in stopping prostate cancer spread to boneWashington, June 8: A new drug designed to target mainly two important pathways linked to the growth and spread of prostate cancer is showing promise to kill tumors that have spread to the bone, a new study has shown.

Researchers enrolled 171 men in the trial with metastatic prostate cancer, in which more than three-quarters of the men enrolled, had seen their cancer spread to the bone.


New targeted therapy for prostate cancer can kill resistant tumor cells

 New targeted therapy for prostate cancer can kill resistant tumor cellsWashington, June 6 : Advanced, hormone-resistant prostate cancer can now be killed with the help of a new-targeted therapy that has proved to halt tumor growth in animals.


Drug for rare childhood cancer may help prevent prostate cancer spread

 Drug for rare childhood cancer may help prevent prostate cancer spreadWashington, April 30 : A new study has found that a drug developed to treat Ewing''s Sarcoma, a rare childhood cancer, may also help prevent human prostate cancer from spreading.


MRI can help locate prostate cancer recurrence at extremely low PSA levels

 MRI can help locate prostate cancer recurrence at extremely low PSA levelsWashington, April 30 : According to a study recently presented at the Cancer Imaging and Radiation Therapy Symposium in Atlanta, an MRI can locate prostate cancer recurrence at extremely low PSA levels.

Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston evaluated 389 postprostatectomy patients treated between January 2004 and October 2010 to confirm the finding.


Change in PSA level poor predictor of prostate cancer

Prostate CancerWashington, Apr 10 : Change in PSA levels over time, known as PSA velocity, is a poor predictor of prostate cancer and may lead to many unnecessary biopsies, according to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Several groups, including the National Cancer Center Network and the American Urological Association, recommend that men with high PSA velocity get a biopsy for prostate cancer, even if there are no other indicators that cancer may exist.


Potential driver of some aggressive prostate cancers found

Potential driver of some aggressive prostate cancers foundWashington, Apr 5: A research team, including an Indian-origin scientist, has found that the mutations of a gene called KRAS, which is known to play a role in numerous cancers, may drive the aggressive spread of a rare subset of prostate cancers.


New tool opens alternate door to prostate cancer diagnosis

Prostate CancerWashington, April 03 : A new study has suggested that it may not be necessary to look for tumors directly in patients with prostate cancer — analyzing non-tumor tissue may be an effective option.

"A biopsy needle does not need to hit a tumor to detect the presence of tumor," said lead researcher Dan Mercola, professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of California at Irvine.


20-year-long study finds prostate cancer screening doesn''t cut death risk

20-year-long study finds prostate cancer screening doesn''t cut death riskLondon, April 1: A 20-year-long study has found that screening men for prostate cancer does not significantly reduce deaths from the disease, but increases the risk of treating many people unnecessarily.

The findings are based on a trial started in Sweden in 1987 involving 9,026 men aged 50-69 years identified in the National Population Register.


Change in PSA level poor predictor of prostate cancer

 Change in PSA level poor predictor of prostate cancerWashington, Feb 25: Change in PSA levels over time, known as PSA velocity, is a poor predictor of prostate cancer and may lead to many unnecessary biopsies, according to researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.


Dogs can ‘sniff out’ prostate cancer accurately from urine sample

Dogs can ‘sniff out’ prostate cancer accurately from urine sampleWashington, Feb 8: Researchers have found that some dogs can be trained to accurately sniff out chemicals released in urine that are associated with prostate cancer (PCa).

According to Jean-Nicolas Cornu and colleagues, a trained dog was able to identify volatile compounds (VOCs) that are cancer biomarkers with significant accuracy that could help with prostate cancer diagnosis.


Molecular predictor of metastatic prostate cancer identified

Molecular predictor of metastatic prostate cancer identifiedLondon, Feb 03: Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have indicated that prostate tumors that carry a "signature" of four molecular markers have the potential to become dangerously metastatic if not treated aggressively.


Protein that protects against prostate cancer discovered

Protein that protects against prostate cancer discoveredWashington, Feb 01: Scientists have identified an important protein, produced naturally inside cells, that appears to suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells in the laboratory.

The findings offer promising leads for research towards new treatments.


Exercise can help slash prostate cancer risk in men

Exercise can help slash prostate cancer risk in menLondon, Jan 6 - Regular exercise can help men with prostate cancer halve their risk of dying from the disease, a British study has found.

The study found that physical activity was linked to a lower risk of dying prematurely from any cause, and in particular from the disease.


Exercise ‘cuts death risk for men with prostate cancer’

 Exercise ‘cuts death risk for men with prostate cancer’Washington, Jan 6: Physical activity is associated with a lower risk of overall mortality and of death due to prostate cancer, a new study has found.

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health and University of California, San Francisco also found that men who did more vigorous activity had the lowest risk of dying from the disease.


Researchers look at new treatment for prostate cancer

Researchers look at new treatment for prostate cancerLondon, Nov 15 - A major discovery could pave the way for new treatments in prostate cancer. Researchers have found that male hormones play a key role in promoting a specific genetic change that fuels the growth of tumours.

Their study focused on male sex hormones called androgens and their influence on fusing together genes, according to the journal Cancer Research.


Aspirin cuts prostate cancer risk

Aspirin cuts prostate cancer risk  London, Oct 27 : Prostate cancer sufferers can halve their chances of dying by taking aspirin daily.

A 10-year study of 5,275 men with the early stages of disease, conducted by the Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, US, found that aspirin reduced the risk of dying from 10 percent to four percent.


Now, remote sensing to kill prostate cancer

Now, remote sensing to kill prostate cancer  London, Oct 26 :Remote sensing is helping a new radiotherapy treatment combat prostate cancer.

The revolutionary technique has already been used on dozens of patients at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London.

Because it only pinpoints cancer cells, it could impart a cutting edge to radiotherapy for thousands of men and save them from the unpleasant side-effects, the Daily Mail reported Tuesday.


Taking aspirin daily ''cuts prostate cancer risk by 30pc’

Taking aspirin daily ''cuts prostate cancer risk by 30pc’London, Aug 12 : A new research has shown that taking a low dose of aspirin every day can cut the risk of prostate cancer by almost 30 per cent.

According to scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle, a 75mg tablet taken on a daily basis has a powerful protective effect against the disease.


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