Skin Cancer

Skin cancer risk? Beer to the rescue

Skin cancer risk? Beer to the rescueWashington D. C, Oct 22 - A new study has revealed that vitamin B3 derivative can cut risk of new skin cancers.

A year of treatment with nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, significantly lowered the risk of common, non-melanoma skin cancer in high-risk patients, according to University of Sydney research.


Gene mutation behind deadly skin cancer identified

Gene mutation behind deadly skin cancer identifiedWashington, March 31 - Researchers have identified gene mutation that is responsible for a hereditary form of skin cancer melanoma.

The study has found that people with specific mutations in the POT1 gene were extremely likely to develop melanoma and these mutations deactivate the gene that protects the ends of our chromosomes from damage.


Obesity gene found to be risk factor for skin cancer

Obesity gene found to be risk factor for skin cancerLondon, March 5 : Researchers have found that the first evidence that an obesity gene is also a risk factor for melanoma.

Variations in a different part of the FTO gene, called intron 1, are already known to be the most important genetic risk factor for obesity and overeating.


Tattoos may increase risk of skin cancer: Doctors

Tattoos may increase risk of skin cancer: DoctorsNew Delhi, Feb 4 : Tattooing, so popular among the young, can increase the risk of skin cancer, say doctors.

According to doctors, inks used in tattoos may contain toxic elements, which can cause skin cancer, especially blue ink, the age-old colour of choice for tattoo artists, which has cobalt and aluminum.


Milk thistle protects against skin cancer

Milk thistle protects against skin cancerWashington, Jan 31 : Silibinin, an extract from the milk thistle, protects against skin cancer and aging caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, especially for those who are fond of tanning, says a new study.


UV nail lamps pose no skin cancer threat

UV nail lamps pose no skin cancer threatJohannesburg, December 8 : UV lamps used at nail salons do not appear to significantly increase the risk of developing a type of skin cancer called keratinocyte carcinoma, researchers say.

In a new study, researchers assessed the risk of keratinocyte carcinoma associated with the use of three UV nail lamp models.


Grow a moustache to fight off skin cancer

Grow a moustache to fight off skin cancer	Melbourne, Nov. 24 : Researchers have found that moustaches and facial hair have benefits well beyond aesthetics, as they can reduce the risk of skin cancer.


Soon, cream that may help fight skin cancer

Soon, cream that may help fight skin cancerLondon, October 8 : Scientists have taken the first step towards creating a simple cream that they hope could one day treat skin cancer.

Researchers at Melbourne's RMIT University have designed a new chemical that acts like a known virus by killing off melanoma cells.

While the chemical is effective at destroying the cancer cells, normal skin cells remain unharmed.


New smartphone app checks for signs of skin cancer

New smartphone app checks for signs of skin cancerLondon, October 4 : A new smartphone app can help people with moles identify if a little blemish might turn into a big problem at the tap of a screen.

`Doctor Mole' uses augmented reality technology to check moles for irregularities in size, shape, colour and border.

After taking a picture of a mole, the user is presented with a colour-coded `risk' level for each of these characteristics.


Tanning beds could cause non-melanoma skin cancer

Tanning beds could cause non-melanoma skin cancerLondon, October 3 : Indoor tanning is already an established risk factor for malignant melanoma, the less common but deadliest form of skin cancer.

Now, a new analysis led by UCSF has confirmed that indoor tanning significantly increases the risk of non-melanoma skin cancers, the most common human skin cancers.


Tanning may trigger most lethal form of skin cancer

Tanning may trigger most lethal form of skin cancerLondon, July 24 : Tanning is traditionally believed to protect against skin cancer, but a new study conducted by GW researchers has broken this misconception.

There is no such thing as a safe tan, according to GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) researchers Edward C. De Fabo, Ph. D., Frances P. Noonan, Ph. D., and Anastas Popratiloff, M. D., Ph. D.


Skin cancer-promoting gene discovered

Skin cancer-promoting gene discoveredLondon, July 11 : Researchers have discovered a gene that plays a central role in black skin cancer, also known as melanoma.

Suppressing this gene in mice inhibits the development of melanoma and its proliferation - a discovery that could pave the way for new forms of therapy.

Melanoma is particularly aggressive and becoming increasingly common in Switzerland, and despite intensive research there is still no treatment.


Molecule in immune system `may help fight skin cancer`

Molecule in immune system `may help fight skin cancer`London, July 9 : Researchers, including one of Indian origin, have found that high expression of a cell-signalling molecule, known as interleukin-9, in immune cells inhibits melanoma growth.


Now, gene-altering moisturiser to fight skin cancer

Now, gene-altering moisturiser to fight skin cancerLondon, July 8 : Scientists at Northwestern University have supercharged moisturiser with gene-regulation technology to tackle skin cancer.

In case of skin conditions like melanoma, treatments that are applied directly to the skin are the ideal drug solution as they are easy to use and they affect only the area under which they are applied.


Increasing coffee intake can cut risk of most common form of skin cancer

Washington, July 2 : People could lower their risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, by increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee they drink, suggest researchers.

A new study found that consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with risk of basal cell carcinoma.


Common painkillers like aspirin `can help protect against skin cancer`

Common painkillers like aspirin `can help protect against skin cancer`London, May 29 : Aspirin or ibuprofen dramatically slashes the risk of developing skin cancer and appear to give people who regularly take them protection against it, new research has found.

The humble painkillers have already been hailed for reducing the risk of heart attack, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer and even Parkinson's disease.


Millions put themselves at risk believing spray tan will stop skin cancer

 Millions put themselves at risk believing spray tan will stop skin cancer London, Sept 20 : A study has found that millions of people are putting themselves at risk of developing skin cancer, because they believe that a spray tan will protect them from getting sunburnt.

The study found that one in six women believe that a fake tan works like a sunscreen and nearly half think their foundation make-up provides them with protection from the sun's harmful rays.


Promising new drug to treat ‘deadliest’ skin cancer developed

Promising new drug to treat ‘deadliest’ skin cancer developedWashington, August 19 : Researchers have developed a new drug to treat malignant melanoma, a deadliest form of skin cancer.

Powerful X-ray technology developed at the U. S. Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) national laboratories has revealed new insights into diseases ranging from Alzheimer''s to the swine flu, and, most recently, enabled the discovery of a groundbreaking new drug treatment for malignant melanoma.


Scientists complete whole-exome sequencing of skin cancer

Scientists complete whole-exome sequencing of skin cancerWashington, Apr 16: A team of scientists at the National Institutes of Health has become the first to systematically survey the landscape of the melanoma genome, the DNA code of the deadliest form of skin cancer.

The researchers have made surprising new discoveries using whole-exome sequencing, an approach that decodes the 1-2 percent of the genome that contains protein-coding genes.


New injectable drug hailed as milestone in treating deadly skin cancer

Skin CancerLondon, Mar 27 : A breakthrough cancer drug has been given the go-ahead to treat late-stage melanoma.

The injectable drug Yervoy hailed as the first to prolong the lives of patients with melanoma as been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, reports the Daily Mail.

The drug, known chemically as ipilimumab, only worked in a small proportion of patients studied, and on average they lived just four months longer than patients given older medications.


New injectable drug hailed as milestone in treating deadly skin cancer

London, Mar 26: A breakthrough cancer drug has been given the go-ahead to treat late-stage melanoma.

The injectable drug Yervoy hailed as the first to prolong the lives of patients with melanoma as been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, reports the Daily Mail.

The drug, known chemically as ipilimumab, only worked in a small proportion of patients studied, and on average they lived just four months longer than patients given older medications.

But experts say it''s milestone in treating the deadliest form of skin cancer.


New laser-based tool ‘detects signs of skin cancer’

 New laser-based tool ‘detects signs of skin cancer’Washington, Feb 24: High-resolution images from a laser-based tool could help doctors better diagnose melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, according to researchers at Duke University.

The tool probes skin cells using two lasers to pump small amounts of energy, less than that of a laser pointer, into a suspicious mole.


Tiny laser detects signs of skin cancer

Tiny laser detects signs of skin cancerLondon, Feb 24 : A tiny laser can detect signs of skin cancer and save thousands of lives, scientists say.

The device fires a double laser beam, with less combined energy than a laser pointer, into a suspicious mole and analyses the locations of different skin pigments.


Skin cancer’s influence on quality of life ‘more substantial for women’

Skin cancer’s influence on quality of life ‘more substantial for women’ Washington, Feb 22: A new study has found that women experience more health-related quality of life issues than men for up to 10 years following a diagnosis of the skin cancer melanoma.


Skin cancer’s influence on quality of life ‘more substantial for women’

Skin cancer’s influence on quality of life ‘more substantial for women’Washington, Feb 22: A new study has found that women experience more health-related quality of life issues than men for up to 10 years following a diagnosis of the skin cancer melanoma.


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