Sleep Apnea

Blame your sleep apnea for forgetting where you parked your car

Blame your sleep apnea for forgetting where you parked your carWashington, Oct 30 : Scientists have revealed that sleep apnea may affect people's ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where they have parked their car.

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center conclude people took longer to complete a 3D maze when sleep apnea disrupted the REM stage of sleep.


An electronic nose that sniffs sleep apnea

An electronic nose that sniffs sleep apneaBerlin, Oct 25 - An electronic nose used in detecting molecules in a patient's breath could be tweaked to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea, dangerous pauses in breathing.

The gold standard used to identify sleep apnea is an overnight sleep test, a technically demanding, time-consuming and cost-intensive system.


'Elbow test' may predict sleep apnea

'Elbow test' may predict sleep apneaToronto, Oct 22 - Have you ever been "elbowed" by your bed partner because you were snoring? If yes, new research says you could have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA).

Prior to polysomnography (sleep) testing, researchers from the University of Saskatchewan asked 124 patients two questions: Does your bed-partner ever poke or elbow you because you are snoring, and does your bed-partner ever poke or elbow you because you have stopped breathing?


Women suffer high rates of sleep apnea: Study

Women suffer high rates of sleep apnea: StudyStockholm, Aug 16 - Women suffer from high rates of sleep apnoea, a condition marked by frequent pauses in breathing during sleep, despite the disorder being linked predominantly with males.

The study from Uppsala and Umea Universities also suggest that women with hypertension and/or obesity were more likely to experience sleep apnoea.


People with sleep apnea face stroke risk

People with sleep apnea face stroke riskWashington, Apr 6: A new study has warned that persons with serious cases of sleep apnea-which is basically characterized by intense snoring accompanied by prolonged pauses in breathing (more than ten seconds)- have 2.5 times more the possibility of suffering an ischemic stroke.


Soon, urine test for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

Washington, December 07 : Scientists say they have found a technique that can determine whether a child has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or habitual snoring by screening their urine.

Researchers at the University of Chicago studied 90 children, referred to the sleep clinic to be evaluated for suspected sleep disordered breathing.

Also, 30 non-snoring children were roped in to serve as controls.

The children were made to undergo standard overnight polysomnography and were categorized either as having OSA, habitual snoring or no sleep disordered breathing.


Obstructive sleep apnea causes early death in stroke victims

Obstructive Sleep ApneaWashington, May 19: Researchers at the University Hospital in Umea, Sweden, have found that stroke victims who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea die earlier than stroke victims who do not have sleep apnea or who have central sleep apnea.


Obstructive sleep apnea treatment with CPAP may lower blood pressure

Obstructive sleep apnea treatment with CPAP may lower blood pressureWashington, May 19 : Researchers in Spain have found that hypertensive adults who are treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may also lower their blood pressure from the therapy.


Air travel puts people with obstructive sleep apnea at cardiac stress risk

Washington, Obstructive Sleep ApneaMay 19: Researchers at the Department of Thoracic Medicine at Concord Repatriation General Hospital in Sydney, Australia, have discovered that people with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at an increased risk of cardiac stress on commercial airline flights.


Body clock ‘cog’ finding could end jet lag

sleepLondon, May 16 : International travellers, who often complain of jet lag and sleeping disorders will soon have a treatment in hand, as scientists have now discovered a unique “cog" in the sleep-controlling human body clock which may help them avert these disorders.

It is believed that the body clock governs the circadian rhythms of the body and connects the cycles of metabolism and behaviour to the cycle of day and night.


Lack of sleep in childhood linked to behavioural difficulties later in life

Lack of sleep in childhood linked to behavioural difficulties later in lifeWashington, April 8 : Children who get less sleep are more likely to suffer from symptoms of anxiety, depression and aggression later in life, a new study has found.


Tonsillectomy can improve life for children with sleep apnea

Tonsillectomy can improve life for children with sleep apneaWashington, Feb 13: A study has found that a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy is the best way for improving the life of children who are suffering from obstructive sleep apnea.


Snoring may increase chronic bronchitis risk

Snoring Sleep disorderWashington, Jan 29: People who snore regularly are more likely to develop chronic bronchitis, according to a new study.

Chronic bronchitis involves inflammation of the lower airways accompanied by a persistent cough and the production of mucus or phlegm.


Surgery shouldn’t be the first option to treat obstructive sleep apnoea

Obstructive Sleep ApnoeaLondon, Jan 4: Researchers at the University of Adelaide have suggested that surgery for obstructive sleep apnoea has no clear benefit and therefore should not be offered as a first treatment.

Guidelines suggest continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with weight and alcohol management, as the first line treatment. However, upper airway surgery is becoming increasingly popular, reports BMJ.


Sleep apnea patients have altered cardiovascular responses during exercise recovery

Washington, Jan 2: Sleep ApneaPeople with untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) have altered cardiovascular responses during recovery from maximal exercise, says a new study.

OSA is a sleep-related breathing disorder that causes your body to stop breathing during sleep. OSA occurs when the tissue in the back of the throat collapses and blocks the airway. This keeps air from getting into the lungs.


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