Stress

Help others with everyday tasks to beat your stress

Help others with everyday tasks to beat your stressWashington D. C, Dec 15 - Feeling stressed? The remedy may be lying in helping others, according to a new study.

Providing help to friends, acquaintances and even strangers can mitigate the impact of daily stressors on our emotions and our mental health, according to the Yale University School of Medicine research.


Overweight people at bigger risk of stress-related diseases

Overweight people at bigger risk of stress-related diseasesWashington, Sept 23 - A new research has found that people who are overweight face greater risk of developing stress-related diseases like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer.

According to the researchers from Brandeis University overweight and obese individuals have higher levels of stress-induced inflammation than those within a healthy weight-range.


Being stress free may help you get clearer skin

Being stress free may help you get clearer skinWashington, Aug 10 - A new study has revealed that stress may be linked to inflammatory skin conditions, such as acne, psoriasis and rosacea and that it can make inflammatory skin conditions worse.


Healthy lifestyle cuts down negative effects of stress

Healthy lifestyle cuts down negative effects of stressWashington, July 30 - A new study has revealed that following a healthy lifestyle, that comprises of a healthy diet, sleep and exercise, counters the negative effects of stress.

According to the study by UC San Francisco, the participants who exercised, slept well and ate well had less telomere shortening than the ones who didn't maintain healthy lifestyles, even when they had similar levels of stress.


Stress reduces pregnancy chances by 30 pc: Study

Stress reduces pregnancy chances by 30 pc: StudyWashington, March 25 - A new study has found that stressed-out women are at an increased risk of infertility, which reduces their chances of getting pregnant by around 30 percent.


It takes two to tango to cope with stress

It takes two to tango to cope with stressNew York, Jan 30 - If you are stressed about the afternoon video chat with a key client, don't fret. Instead, find a colleague who has a similar emotional reaction to the same scenario and share your feelings with him/her.

One way to cope with work-induced stress is to open up with someone who is having a similar emotional approach to the same situation, shows research.


Excessive stress making kids lose appetite and sleep

Excessive stress making kids lose appetite and sleepLondon, Nov 22 - Almost half of children are losing sleep due to stress, while more than one in ten are not able to eat, a new study has revealed.

According to a survey, the majority of ten to 14-year-olds are fretting about their exams, with 21 percent also saying that their concerns have caused them to avoid friends.


Infant's pain alters response to anxiety and stress later in life

Infant's pain alters response to anxiety and stress later in lifeWashington, Oct 31 - Pain experienced by infants who often do not receive analgesics while undergoing tests and treatment in neonatal intensive care may permanently alter future responses to anxiety, stress and pain in adulthood, as early life pain alters neural circuits in the brain that regulate stress, a new study has revealed.


Work-related stress `not linked to cancer`

Work-related stress `not linked to cancer` London, February 8 : Stress at work is highly unlikely to be a cause of the four most common types of cancer including colorectal, lung, breast and prostate, according to a large international review of previous research.

Around 90 percent of cancers are linked to environmental exposures and whilst some exposures are well recognised (such as UV radiation and tobacco smoke), others are not (psychological factors such as stress).


Impact of stress `affects genes of future generations`

Impact of stress `affects genes of future generations` London, January 26 : Genes chemically silenced by stress during life remain silenced in eggs and sperm, allowing the effect to be passed down to the next generation, researchers say.


Babies born to stressed mums likelier to be bullied at school

Babies born to stressed mums likelier to be bullied at schoolWashington, November 15 : Children whose mothers were overly stressed during pregnancy are more likely to become victims of bullying at school, a new study has found.

Scientists from the University of Warwick have shown that stress and mental health problems in pregnant women may affect the developing baby and directly increases the risk of the child being victimised in later life.


Depression and stress can cause lapses in proper use of contraception

Depression and stress can cause lapses in proper use of contraceptionWashington, November 5 : Women with moderate to severe depression and stress symptoms were less likely to use contraception consistently — that is, use it each time they had sex — compared to women with mild or no symptoms, a new study has found.

Women with depression or stress were also more likely to say they did not use contraception at all in the past week compared to women with less severe symptoms.


Kids with stressed-out parents likelier to be obese

Kids with stressed-out parents likelier to be obeseWashington, October 23 : Stress in parents may contribute to obesity in their kids, and as this strain rises, their offspring eat fast food more often, according to a new study.

"Stress in parents may be an important risk factor for child obesity and related behaviors," said Elizabeth Prout-Parks, M. D., a physician nutrition specialist at The Children''s Hospital of Philadelphia, who led a study.


Work stress `ups heart disease risk`

Work stress `ups heart disease risk`London, September 14 : A highly demanding job but having little control over it could be a deadly combination, a new study has revealed.

For the study, the researchers analysed existing studies covering nearly 200,000 people and found "job strain" was linked to a 23 percent increased risk of heart attacks and deaths from coronary heart disease.

According to the study, the risk to the heart was much smaller than for smoking or not exercising.


How stress and depression shrink brain

How stress and depression shrink brain London, August 13 : People suffering from major depression or chronic stress suffer loss of brain volume, a condition that contributes to both emotional and cognitive impairment.

Now a team of researchers led by Yale scientists has discovered the cause behind this condition- a single genetic switch that triggers loss of brain connections in humans and depression in animal models.


Eating eggs during pregnancy may lessen stress for baby

Eating eggs during pregnancy may lessen stress for babyWashington, August 2 : Increasing intake of choline, a nutrient found in high quantities in eggs, during pregnancy may reduce the risk of the baby developing metabolic and chronic stress-related diseases like high blood pressure and diabetes later in life, suggests a new research from Cornell University.

The study suggested that choline might help protect against the effects of a mother's stress during pregnancy.


Smiling speeds recovery from stress

Smiling speeds recovery from stressWashington, July 31 - Feeling good usually makes us smile, but does it work the other way around? Yes, smiling during episodes of stress can help to reduce its intensity regardless of whether a person actually feels happy or not, according to a research.


Stressful jobs making us age prematurely

Stressful jobs making us age prematurely London, July 30 : Finnish researchers have confirmed that a stressful job could make us old and sick before time.

Led by Kirsi Ahola of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, the researchers measured the length of DNA sections called telomeres and how the lengths varied in association with job stress and found that people suffering from the most job stress tended to have shorter telomeres.


Kirtan Kriya meditation good at beating stress

Kirtan Kriya meditation good at beating stressWashington, July 25 - Six months after researchers showed how a specific yoga involving daily meditation cut down stress levels of those caring for Alzheimer's and dementia patients now know the reason why.

Practising Kirtan Kriya, a meditation chant exercise originating from Kundalini Yoga, for just 12 minutes daily for eight weeks, led to a easing of the biological mechanisms behind a spike in the immune system's inflammation response.


Stress can be good for immune system

Stress can be good for immune systemWashington, June 22 : Stress is bad for you -- you've heard it a thousand times. But it can be good for your immune system, says a study.


Stress `may delay brain development in kids`

Stress `may delay brain development in kids` Washington, June 7 : Stress may affect brain development in children altering growth of a specific piece of the brain and abilities associated with it, a new study has suggested.

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


How repeated stress impairs memory

How repeated stress impairs memoryWashington, March 8 : In a study conducted on rats, scientists have uncovered a neural mechanism that directly links repeated stress with impaired memory.

The study also provides critical insight into why stress responses can act as a trigger for many mental illnesses.

Stress hormones are known to influence the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a brain region that controls high level “executive” functions such as working memory and decision making.


Green spaces cut stress levels in unemployed people

Green spaces cut stress levels in unemployed peopleWashington, Feb 16 : Stress levels of jobless people are related more to their surroundings than their age, gender, disposable income, and degree of deprivation, a new study has revealed.

The presence of parks and woodland in economically deprived areas may help people cope better with job losses, post traumatic stress disorder, chronic fatigue and anxiety, researchers say.


Novel drug target for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder found

Novel drug target for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder foundWashington, Sept 6 : A team of researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine has identified a promising therapeutic target in the brain that could lead to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Alexander Neumeister, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and colleagues collaborated with the Yale Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center to evaluate 96 patients.


Men and women respond differently when it comes to stress

Men and women respond differently when it comes to stressWashington, March 24 : A new study on 20-to-64-year-olds has shown that age and gender play a major role in how people respond to stress.

The new research was led by scientists from the Universite de Montreal and the Montreal Heart Institute in collaboration with colleagues from the Université du Quebec a Montréal and McGill University.


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