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Why we just can’t resist looking at nude pics

Why we just can’t resist looking at nude picsWashington, Nov 18 : A new study has revealed that our brain processes pictures of nude bodies more efficiently than pictures of clothed bodies.

Most people like to look at pictures of nude or scantily clad human bodies.

Looking at nude bodies is sexually arousing, and a nude human body is a classic subject in art.

Advertising, too, has harnessed half-clothed models to evoke positive images about the products advertised.


Presenteeism, the compulsion to attend office even when sick

Presenteeism, the compulsion to attend office even when sickWashington, Nov 18 : Many employees feel the pressure to work even when they are sick, a practice known as presenteeism, as they fear losing their job, but this is not always a productive option, a new study has found.

Depending on individuals and their roles within an organization, sick employees can be present in body and not in spirit, while others can be ill and fully functional.


New family of antimalarial compounds both prevents and cures disease

New family of antimalarial compounds both prevents and cures diseaseWashington, Nov 18 : In a new study, an international team of scientists claim to have discovered a family of chemical compounds that could lead to a new generation of antimalarial drugs capable of not only alleviating symptoms but also preventing the deadly disease.


Concrete thinking’ training can cut depression in just 2 months

‘Concrete thinking’ training can cut depression in just 2 monthsWashington, Nov 18 : An innovative psychological treatment called `concreteness training' can reduce depression in just two months and could work as a self-help therapy for depression in primary care, according to a new study.


Protein, not sugar, key to keeping us alert and thin

Protein, not sugar, key to keeping us alert and thinLondon, Nov 17 : In a finding that could have bearing on obesity and sleep disorders, researchers say it's protein, not sugar, that stimulates cells keeping us awake and thin by burning calories.

According to researchers from University of Cambridge, wakefulness and energy expenditure rely on "orexin cells," which secrete a stimulant called orexin/hypocretin in the brain.


TV viewing more risky for heart than using computers

TV viewing more risky for heart than using computersToronto, Nov 17 : High levels of TV viewing by kids can elevate their chances of developing heart disease later in life, but significantly high use of computer does not.

Different kinds of sedentary behaviour produce different consequences for young people's health, according to the findings from Queen's University, Canada.


Sea salt no healthier than table salt

Sea salt no healthier than table saltLondon, Nov 17 : Sea salt, which can be 19 times as expensive as its humbler cousin table salt, is no healthier because both kinds are overwhelmingly sodium chloride and is just a costlier way to damage your health, say researchers.


Fortis announces two new hospitals in Hyderabad, Agra

Fortis announces two new hospitals in Hyderabad, AgraMumbai, Nov 17 : Fortis Healthcare (India) Thursday announced the launch of two hospitals in Hyderabad and Agra, thus increasing its India network to 68 hospitals.

The hospital in Hyderabad with a 150-bed capacity will be functional in financial year 2013 and is the second project from the company in the city, the company said in a regulatory filing.


New genetic links to impulsive behaviour found

New genetic links to impulsive behaviour foundWashington, Nov 17 : Being impulsive can explain many things -- why we utter things we regret, buy items that we can do without or even develop dangerous addictions.

Indeed, different kinds of hastiness and rashness are built into our DNA, suggests a new study by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Scott Stoltenberg, assistant professor of psychology at Nebraska-Lincoln, found impulsiveness tied to a rarely researched gene, NRXN3.


Beat stress with transcendental meditation

Beat stress with transcendental meditationWashington, Nov 17 : New research shows that transcendental meditation significantly reduces levels of psychological distress among students.

The survey, based on students from 106 secondary schools comprising 87 percent racial and ethnic minorities, showed a 36 percent lowering in overall stress levels, besides easing anxiety and depressive symptoms.


Two-third students prefer sex education given by older teens

Two-third students prefer sex education given by older teensLondon, Nov 16 : A new survey has revealed that secondary school pupils prefer young people giving them sex and relationship education (SRE) lessons rather than their seniors teachers.

According to a survey conducted by ComRes, Half of pupils aged 13 to 17 said that they felt awkward asking their teachers questions about sexual matters and the same number said that they had not learnt enough.


Baby cured with pioneering liver treatment

Baby cured with pioneering liver treatmentLondon, Nov 16 : A baby boy in England has been cured of a life-threatening disease, which was destroying his liver.

Doctors including two of Indian-origin in London implanted cells, which acted like a temporary liver, and allowed the damaged organ to recover.

The team at King's College Hospital in south London say the technique is a world first.


Frequent gaming may enlarge brain`s pleasure centre

 Frequent gaming may enlarge brain`s pleasure centreelbourne, Nov 16 : A new study has found that teenagers, who play video games frequently, have brains with larger pleasure centres.

Dr Simone Kuhn of Charite University Medicine in Berlin and a large team of European collaborators, looked at 154 Berlin school children who were all aged 14 and also played video games.


Now, engineered drug-secreting blood vessels to combat anaemia

Now, engineered drug-secreting blood vessels to combat anaemiaWashington, Nov 16 : Researchers at Children's Hospital Boston have created blood vessels from genetically engineered cells that could secrete drug on demand directly into the bloodstream to combat anaemia.

Patients who rely on recombinant, protein-based drugs must often endure frequent injections, often several times a week, or intravenous therapy.


Brain can repair itself from damage

Brain can repair itself from damageWashington, Nov 16 : Results from new studies have revealed that the brain has a remarkable capacity to repair itself from damage.

The animal studies propose ways to prevent or limit damage after blood and oxygen deprivation and blood clots.

Stroke is the number one cause of long-term disability and the third leading cause of death in the developed world. Limiting the damage caused by stroke would improve patient prognosis.


Telephone counselling as effective as in-person training for weight loss

Telephone counselling as effective as in-person training for weight lossWashington, Nov 16 : Weight-loss programs delivered over the phone by health coaches and with website and physician support are just as effective as others involving in-person coaching sessions, a new study has claimed.


Stop signal for common form of skin cancer discovered

Stop signal for common form of skin cancer discoveredWashington, Nov 16 : An international team of scientists has discovered a gene that helps protect the body from a common form of skin cancer - squamous cell cancer (SCC).


Alcoholic women suffer quicker brain damage than men

Alcoholic women suffer quicker brain damage than menWashington, Nov 16 : Swedish scientists have found that high alcohol consumption damages the serotonin system in women's brains more readily than that in men's brains.

A significant decrease in the function of the serotonin system in women's brains can be seen after only four years of problem drinking, while it takes 12 years before a corresponding decrease is seen in men.


Alcoholic carrying particular gene variant ‘10 times likelier to die prematurely’

Alcoholic carrying particular gene variant ‘10 times likelier to die prematurely’Washington, Nov 16 : People who are addicted to alcohol and also carry a particular variant of a gene are at increased risk of premature death, according to a Swedish study.


Mirror trick could ease arthritis pain

Mirror trick could ease arthritis painLondon, Nov 15 : Arthritic pain can be eased by an optical illusion relying on mirrors to trick the brain.

A simple trick makes it seem as if the painful joints have been replaced by healthier ones, causing the brain to believe it is less stiff and painful.


A jab could lower cholesterol by two-thirds

A jab could lower cholesterol by two-thirdsLondon, Nov 15 : Harmful cholesterol could be reduced by 64 percent with a single injection. It could potentially be used for those who don't respond well to statins, a class of drugs used to lower cholestrol levels.

The jab, tested in humans for the first time, lowered the level of so called bad cholesterol by 64 percent as compared with a placebo.


Human enzyme holds promise of weight loss

Human enzyme holds promise of weight lossWashington, Nov 15 : A specific human enzyme substantially curbed weight, improved metabolism and efficacy of insulin in mice, a new study shows.

Insulin, produced by the pancreatic gland, helps glucose move from the bloodstream into cells, where it is required for movement, growth and repair. This explains why diabetics who do not make or use insulin can become very weak.


Popping too many pills ruins bedroom performance

Popping too many pills ruins bedroom performanceWashington, Nov 15 : The habit of popping several pills daily could hit your bedroom performance and send it plummeting to a zero, a new study reveals.

The study by Kaiser Permanente, part of the California Men's Health Study, surveyed 37,712 men from southern California who popped pills daily, resulting in severe erectile dysfunction (ED).


Sugared beverages raise heart, diabetes risks for women

Sugared beverages raise heart, diabetes risks for womenWashington, Nov 15 : Drinking two or more sugared beverages daily could not only bloat a woman's waistline but also elevate the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Researchers compared middle-aged and older women who drank two or more sugared beverages such as carbonated sodas or flavoured water with added sugar daily, to women who drank less.


Alcohol, obesity behind alarming rate of throat and liver cancer in UK

Alcohol, obesity behind alarming rate of throat and liver cancer in UKLondon, Nov 14 : Alcohol and obesity are to be blamed for the alarming rate of throat and liver cancer in the UK as compared to anywhere else in Europe, a new study has claimed.

The oesophagus is the tube that links the back of the mouth to the stomach, and around 8,000 oesophageal cancer cases are diagnosed in the UK each year and more than 7,000 die from it.


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