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Role of mystery enzyme behind high BP identified

Role of mystery enzyme behind high BP identifiedLondon, Nov 1 : In what has come as a major breakthrough, scientists have finally discovered what causes high blood pressure, thus paving the way to transform treatment with targeted drugs.

After 40 years of research, scientists have been able to pin down the mysterious role of an enzyme called renin.


Exact brain locations that lead to addictive, compulsive behaviour identified

Exact brain locations that lead to addictive, compulsive behaviour identifiedWashington, Oct 31 : The exact locations in the brain where calculations are made that can result in addictive and compulsive behaviour have been identified by neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley.

They have found how neural activity in the brain's orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex regulates our choices.


Chocolate milk can help you get best results after workout

Chocolate milk can help you get best results after workoutWashington, Oct 31 : Chocolate milk is the best choice when it comes to fuelling yourself after a hard session at the gym.

This will provide you with the benefits of carbohydrates, while giving you the optimal protein source found in milk, Fox News reported.


‘Muffin top’ waistline puts women at risk of cancer and fuels its growth

‘Muffin top’ waistline puts women at risk of cancer and fuels its growthLondon, Oct 31 : Women with a bulging "muffin top" waistline are not only at greater risk of cancer, but their tumours are also likely to grow faster, according to a new study.

Scientists at the University of Chicago have warned that bulging waistline acts as a "launching pad" for the rapid spread of the disease.


Mysterious role of renin in hypertension unlocked

 Mysterious role of renin in hypertension unlockedSydney, Oct 31 : A Sydney medical scientist has finally uncovered a secret central to the cause of high blood pressure after a 40-year long hunt.

Professor Brian Morris and his Sydney University team have found hitherto mysterious role of the enzyme renin in triggering the condition.


Millions of middle class Brits drinking to harmful levels at home

 Millions of middle class Brits drinking to harmful levels at homeLondon, Oct 31 : A new study has revealed that millions of middle class Britons are drinking too much at home in the evening or over dinner, risking a future of ill health blighted by cancer, liver disease and even mental health problems.

They are not "binge drinking" or even getting drunk but they are causing huge damage to their bodies and long-term health.


Key protein fuelling growth of cancer identified

Key protein fuelling growth of cancer identifiedWashington, Oct 31 : Scientists have identified a key mechanism of metastasis that could lead to blocking tumor growth if their findings are confirmed.


Contraception pills hamper orgasm in women

Contraception pills hamper orgasm in womenWashington, Oct 31 : Newer forms of hormonal contraception hampers arousal, lubrication and orgasm despite its family planning benefits and convenience, according to new research.

"Contraception in general is a wonderful way for women to plan their families," said lead researcher Nicole Smith, project coordinator at IU's Center for Sexual Health Promotion.


Bacteria ‘disabler’ antibiotic silences resistant bugs for good

Bacteria ‘disabler’ antibiotic silences resistant bugs for goodWashington, Oct 31 : After 70 years, antibiotics are still the primary treatment for overcoming bacterial infections, but they are becoming less effective against resistant bugs that cause them, according to new research.

A microbiologist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) has argued that instead of killing the bacteria, disarming them would quash the disease without the worry of antibiotic resistance.


Ovarian cancer feeds on fat cells in abdomen

Ovarian cancer feeds on fat cells in abdomenLondon, Oct 31 : A research team based at the University of Chicago has found that large pad of fat cells that extends from the stomach and covers the intestines provides nutrients that promote the spread and growth of ovarian cancer.


Cure to parasitic roundworm found in its genes

Cure to parasitic roundworm found in its genesLondon, Oct 29 : An international team of researchers has sequenced the draft genome of Ascaris suum, a parasitic roundworm of pig, paving the way for the development of new and urgently needed interventions (drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tests) against ascariasis and other nematodiases.

Ascaris worms are soil-transmitted helminths causing ascariasis in human and animals.


‘Passive’ TV exposure can harm kids’ speech development

 ‘Passive’ TV exposure can harm kids’ speech developmentLondon, Oct 29 : Children are as vulnerable to the effects of `passive TV' as they are to secondhand smoking, and could harm their language development making it harder for them to cope when they go to school, experts have claimed.

The American Academy of Paediatrics warns about `secondhand television' in its guidelines for children aged under two.


Compound that can fight different types of viral diseases identified

 Compound that can fight different types of viral diseases identifiedWashington, Oct 29 : Researchers have identified a compound that inhibits the replication of several different viruses, including the highly aggressive SARS virus that is responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome
(SARS) using a new approach.

The compound prevents the replication of viruses by depriving them of an essential host factor.


Cranberry juice more effective than extracts in fighting infections

Cranberry juice more effective than extracts in fighting infectionsWashington, Oct 29 : Cranberry juice is far better than extracts of the fruit at fighting bacterial infections, according to a new study.


Cigarettes from genetically altered tobacco may help quit smoking

Cigarettes from genetically altered tobacco may help quit smokingNew York, Oct 29 : A research company in North Carolina is testing new experimental cigarettes made of genetically altered tobacco to lower the nicotine content by 97 percent while preserving all the other tastes and smells and rituals for smokers of conventional cigarettes.


Stressed out adolescents may face health problems in mid-adulthood

Stressed out adolescents may face health problems in mid-adulthoodWashington, Oct 28 : People who led difficult lives during adolescence period will most likely experience health problems in their later life, a new study suggests.


People worry more about money than health

 People worry more about money than healthLondon, Oct 28 : A survey has revealed that almost a third of people consider financial well-being to be their utmost matter of concern, rather than physical well-being.

The financial concerns include worries about not being able to make ends meet, sinking into further debt, a friend or family member having money problems and the possibility of sinking into a double-dip recession.


Curiosity helps boost students’ academic performance

Curiosity helps boost students’ academic performanceWashington, Oct 28 : Curiosity plays a big part in students' academic performance, a new study has suggested.

The study said personality traits like curiosity, in fact, seem to be as important as intelligence in determining how well students do in school.


Burmese Python may harbour human heart disease cure

Burmese Python may harbour human heart disease cureWashington, Oct 28 : Scientist have identified three fatty acids involved in the extreme growth of Burmese pythons' hearts following large meals, which they believe could help in treating diseased human hearts.

Growth of the human heart can be beneficial when resulting from exercise - a type of growth known as physiological cardiac hypertrophy - but damaging when triggered by disease - growth known as pathological hypertrophy.


People consume more of tiny-sized candies than in regular-sized packages

People consume more of tiny-sized candies than in regular-sized packagesWashington, Oct 28 : A study has revealed that people's consumption pattern for candies and chocolates vary according to the packaging of the product.

University of Alberta researcher Jennifer Argo's new study indicates that that people eat more of a product when it is placed in small packages rather than regular-sized ones.


Dream reading comes closer to reality

Dream reading comes closer to realityWashington, Oct 28 : A study suggests that when people dream they are performing a particular action, a part of their brain involved in the planning and execution of movement lights up with activity.

According to Current Biology, scanning the brains of lucid dreamers while they slept, would give a glimpse into the non-waking consciousness, and is the first step towards true "dream reading."


Fewer ‘Good Men’ turning women into ‘Mean Girls’

Fewer ‘Good Men’ turning women into ‘Mean Girls’London, Oct 28 : A leading gender expert has claimed that more and more women are turning into `Mean Girls,' and he blames the scarcity of good men as partly responsible for this catty behaviour.

Hugo Schwyzer, a professor of gender studies and history at Pasadena City College, said women are being forced to be more competitive with each other than ever.


Joking and pretending parents give kids head start in life

 Joking and pretending parents give kids head start in lifeWashington, Oct 28 : A new study suggests that parents who joke and pretend with their babies are giving their children a head start in terms of life skills.

According to the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), most parents are naturals at playing the fool with their kids, and those who haven't, can start with their tots.


Stem cells regenerate lung tissue after viral illness

Stem cells regenerate lung tissue after viral illnessWashington, Oct 28 : Adult stem cells have the ability to regenerate lung tissue after viral infection, a new study has suggested.

The findings, which come from studies of isolated human stem cells and of mice infected with a particularly nasty strain of H1N1 influenza virus, could lead to new regenerative therapies for acute and chronic airway diseases.


New test formulated to predict success of chemotherapy

 New test formulated to predict success of chemotherapyWashington, Oct 28 : A new test has been devised to determine the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cancer patients.

The test devised by the scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will predict the effectiveness of drugs based on whether a patient's tumour cells are already "primed" for death.


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