Featured

Scientists explain how stressful situations lead to heart attack

Scientists explain how stressful situations lead to heart attackLondon, June 11 - A new study has revealed the hypothetical mechanism behind heart attack caused by stress, emotional shock, or overexertion.

Hormones released during stressful situations appear to cause bacterial biofilms on arterial walls to disperse, allowing plaque deposits to rupture into the bloodstream that leads to heart attack.


Scientists come closer to linking 'Jekyll and Hyde' protein with type 1 diabetes

Scientists come closer to linking 'Jekyll and Hyde' protein with type 1 diabetesWashington, June 10 - Researchers have shown how a protein, called GAD65, changes its shape when it turns itself on and off and said that this characteristic could also link it to type 1 diabetes.

In the human brain, GAD65 performs an essential role: it makes 'neurotransmitters' - chemicals that pass messages between brain cells.


Adequate sleep for both parents and kids important in curbing child obesity

Adequate sleep for both parents and kids important in curbing child obesityWashington, June 10 - A new study has revealed that parents should encourage proper sleeping routines for kids as well as for themselves, as it can help decrease child obesity.


Alcohol-related terms can also make you aggressive

Alcohol-related terms can also make you aggressiveWashington, June 6 - A new psychology research has shown that exposing people to alcohol-related words can influence aggressive behaviour in ways similar to actually consuming alcohol.

Researchers found however that this aggressive behaviour occurred when people were subjected to provocation in a way that was not a clear-cut insult.


New method to make latent HIV reveal itself identified

New method to make latent HIV reveal itself identifiedWashington, June 6 - Researchers have identified a new way to make latent HIV reveal itself, which could help overcome one of the biggest obstacles to finding a cure for HIV infection.

Leor Weinberger, PhD, Associate Investigator in the Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology and senior author of the study, said understanding how to reactivate latent HIV is one of the major challenges we must overcome in order to find a cure for HIV.


Fatty liver disease prevented in mice

Fatty liver disease prevented in miceWashington, June 4 - Researchers have discovered a way to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease - the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide - in mice.

According to investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, blocking a path that delivers dietary fructose to the liver prevented mice from developing the condition.


'Revolutionary' immune therapy holds key to treatment of advanced bladder cancer

immune therapyWashington, June 2 - New Haven, Conn. - A multi-center phase I study using an investigational drug for advanced bladder cancer patients who did not respond to other treatments has shown promising results in patients with certain tumor types, researchers report.

Yale Cancer Center played a key role in the study, the results of which will be presented Saturday, May 31 at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.


Negative social interactions up risk of hypertension in older adults

Negative social interactions up risk of hypertension in older adultsWashington, May 29 - Researchers have shown that unpleasant or demanding interpersonal encounters increase hypertension risk among older adults.

The study provides some of the first concrete evidence that negative social interactions not only influence psychological well-being but also physical health - in this case, blood pressure levels.


Too much exercise can be dangerous for patients with heart problems

Too much exercise can be dangerous for patients with heart problemsWashington, May 21 : A new research has found that too much exercise may increase the risk of death from heart attack or stroke in patients with existing heart problems.

The new study tracked a decade's worth of exercise habits and survival of more than 1,000 people with diagnosed-but stable-coronary artery disease.


How taste buds help promote long, healthy life

How taste buds help promote long, healthy lifeWashington, May 20 : Two new studies have revealed that taste buds may in fact have a powerful role in a long and healthy life.


Your spit could help diagnose pancreatic cancer

TestWashington, May 19 : Researchers have said that patients with pancreatic cancer have a different and distinct profile of specific bacteria in their saliva compared to healthy controls and even patients with other cancers or pancreatic diseases.

Pedro Torres of San Diego State University who presented the research said their studies suggest that ratios of particular types of bacteria found in saliva may be indicative of pancreatic cancer.


How depression ups heart disease risk

How depression ups heart disease riskSydney, May 12 - A new study has revealed that depression is one of the major risk factors behind heart risk.

According to Professor Gavin Lambert, National Health and Medical Research Fellow at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, depression is a risk factor that needs to be taken as seriously as any other and it may also exacerbate existing heart disease, Sydney Morning Herald reported.


Lack of workout after 30 ups women's lifetime heart disease risk

Lack of workout after 30 ups women's lifetime heart disease riskWashington, May 9 - A new study has revealed that from 30 years of age, inactivity and lack of exercise exerts a greater impact on a woman's lifetime risk of developing heart disease.


Fear of gaining weight deter smokers from quitting smoking

Fear of gaining weight deter smokers from quitting smokingWashington, May 2 : Researchers suggests that smokers may avoid treatment to quit smoking if they previously gained weight while trying to quit.

According to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, weight gain is a predictable occurrence for smokers who have recently quit.


Ancient yoga training program can help women with urinary incontinence

Ancient yoga training program can help women with urinary incontinenceWashington, Apr 26 - An ancient form of meditation and exercise could help women who suffer from urinary incontinence, a new study suggests.

In the study, UC San Francisco researchers discovered that a yoga training program, designed to improve pelvic health, can help women gain more control over their urination and avoid accidental urine leakage .


New anti-depressant mechanisms in brain identified

anti depressant mechanismsWashington, April 23 : Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified a major mechanism by which ghrelin (a hormone with natural anti-depressant properties) works inside the brain.

Simultaneously, the researchers identified a potentially powerful new treatment for depression in the form of a neuroprotective drug known as P7C3.


Now, hope for hepatitis C liver transplant patients

C liver transplantWashington, April 14 : Scientists have revealed that a new research could be a new hope for treating liver transplant patients with recurring hepatitis C (HCV).

The scientists gave sofosbuvir (SOF) and ribavirin (RBV) with pegylated interferon (PEG) to post-liver transplant patients with recurring HCV, who had exhausted all treatment options and had poor clinical prognoses, for up to 48 weeks.


Low vitamin D associated with fatty liver disease in kids

Low vitamin D associated with fatty liver disease in kidsWashington, April 13 : Scientists have identified a genetic variant associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children while investigating link between low vitamin D status and the disease.


Parkinson's disease could soon be history post groundbreaking discovery

Parkinson's DiseaseWashington, April 11 - Working with human neurons and fruit flies, researchers were able to identify and then shut down a biological process that seemed to trigger a particular form of Parkinson's disease present in a large number of patients.


7.11am breakfast 'perfect recipe' for weight-loss success

7.11am breakfast 'perfect recipe' for weight-loss successLondon, April 1 - A new survey has found that eating breakfast at 7.11am can help people shed off the kilos.

The survey, conducted by Forza Supplements on 1,000 people, asked dieters to recommend the perfect time to eat, the Daily Express reported.

Lee Smith, managing director of the firm, said that the key for many dieters is not how much they eat but when they do it.


Heart matters! Married people at less risk of cardiovascular problems

Heart matters! Married people at less risk of cardiovascular problemsNew York, March 29 - This no pundit would ever be able to tell you while scanning your horoscope for a suitable life partner. However, scientists have figured this out well.

Married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, have significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed, a thrilling research reveals.


Office tea rounds may soon be history

Office tea rounds may soon be historyLondon, March 24 - The traditional tea round is in danger of becoming a thing of the past as offices are become busier than ever, a new survey has revealed.

Although office workers drink about five cups of tea or coffee a day, they tend to drink it alone, Daily Express reported.

Office managers are the worst offenders, with nearly half of staff saying their boss never makes them a cup of coffee.


75pc seasonal and pandemic flu sufferers have no symptoms

75pc seasonal and pandemic flu sufferers have no symptomsWashington, March 18 - Researchers have said that around 1 in 5 of the population were infected in both recent outbreaks of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, but just 23 per cent of these infections caused symptoms.


TB resurgence poses grave threat worldwide: Researchers

London, March 17 : Medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres has warned that the rise of new strains of TB which are resistant to drugs pose grave threat worldwide.

The charity said that the efforts to fight multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) have been "inadequate" and they have called for an "immediate international response" to find new treatments, the Independent reported.

Despite continuous efforts TB still kills about 1.3 million people every year.

The new strains that are resistant to antibiotics are much harder to treat, and now nearly 500,000 cases of MDR-TB occur each year. (ANI)


Link between obesity and diabetes found

Link between obesity and diabetes foundWashington, Mar 7 : Researchers have now identified a critical link between obesity and diabetes.

It's by now well established that obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes. But what exactly is it about extra body fat that leads to insulin resistance and blood glucose elevation, the hallmarks of diabetes?


style="display:inline-block;width:468px;height:60px"
data-ad-client="ca-pub-0856505169071067"
data-ad-slot="9597969280">

Syndicate content