Featured

'Cafeteria diet' is short-cut to stroke

'Cafeteria diet' is short-cut to strokeToronto, Oct 1 - 'Cafeteria diet,' rich in fat, sugar and sodium, is often a short-cut to stroke or death at a younger age, said a Canadian study and warned that people in their 30s or 40s may even suffer from dementia due to this junk food diet.

Researchers found that such a diet induced most symptoms of metabolic syndrome - a combination of high levels of cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and obesity - in rats after only two months.


Cherries lower gout attacks by a third

Cherries lower gout attacks by a thirdWashington, Sep 28 : Patients with gout who consumed cherries over a two-day period showed a 35 percent lower risk of gout attacks, as compared to those who did not eat the fruit.

Findings from this research project also suggest that the risk of gout flare-ups was 75 percent lower when cherry intake was combined with the uric-acid reducing drug, allopurinol.


30 percent Chinese consume aluminium in diet

30 percent Chinese consume aluminium in dietBeijing, Sep 28 - Over 30 percent of Chinese consume food made with additives that contain aluminium and which may harm their central nervous system, an official said.

Aluminium-containing additives are a major cause of health problems, Global Times Friday quoted Chen as saying at a food symposium.

Many Chinese eat noodles and steamed buns made with additives that contain aluminium.


4 genetically distinct types of breast cancer identified

4 genetically distinct types of breast cancer identifiedLondon, September 24 : A new study has confirmed the existence of four main subtypes of breast cancer: Luminal A, luminal B, HER2 and basal-like.

The most comprehensive analysis yet of breast cancer also revealed that one of the most deadly subtypes is genetically more similar to ovarian tumors than to other breast cancers.


Topical NSAIDs can help relieve arthritis pain

Topical NSAIDs can help relieve arthritis painWashington, September 23 : Applying topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) - in the form of creams, gels and patches - can provide relief from the pain associated osteoarthritis of the knees or hands, concludes a new review by The Cochrane Library.


Sound levels in ICUs exceed WHO limits

Sound levels in ICUs exceed WHO limitsStockholm, Sep 18 - Tending to the seriously ill in intensive care units (ICUs) requires pin-drop silence, but current noise levels there ranged between 51-55 dB which is comparable to noise levels at a busy road, says a European study. It exceeds WHO recommendations by more than 20 dB.


'Lifestyle diseases growing in developing world'

'Lifestyle diseases growing in developing world'Sydney, Aug 30 - Lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes are no longer a problem just in wealthy nations -- their rates in low-to-middle income countries are outpacing those of the developed countries, according to an Australian study.


New therapy knocks out high BP with radio waves

New therapy knocks out high BP with radio wavesLondon, Aug 27 - A radical new therapy could knock out high blood pressure by zapping the kidneys with radio waves, a new research demonstrates.

The procedure may be available early after trials produced dramatic improvements in the condition. It could be offering succour to the thousands of blood pressure patients who don't respond to drugs.


Drug boosts body's receptivity to Vitamin D

Drug boosts body's receptivity to Vitamin DSydney, July 31 - Patients taking interferon-beta, a drug for multiple sclerosis (MS), received almost three times as much vitamin D from sun exposure than those not taking the treatment, say new findings.

MS is an autoimmune disease that damages the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). There is currently no cure, but treatments are available to ease some of the symptoms.

MS is caused by damage to the myelin sheath that protects nerve cells.


New method detects lung infection in 500-year-old mummy

New method detects lung infection in 500-year-old mummyWashington, July 26 - A 500-year-old frozen Incan mummy suffered bacterial lung infection at the time of its death, as revealed by a novel proteomics method in an ancient sample for the very first time.


Cheese slashes diabetes risk by 12pc

Cheese slashes diabetes risk by 12pc London, July 24 : Eating just two slices of cheese a day can cut the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 12 per cent, researchers say.

The findings go against current health guidelines, which advise cutting back on dairy products and other high-fat foods to help prevent the illness.

British and Dutch researchers looked at the diets of 16,800 healthy adults and 12,400 patients with type 2 diabetes from eight European countries, including the UK.


Cuba to test new AIDS vaccine

Cuba to test new AIDS vaccineHavana, March 7 - Cuba has unveiled a new AIDS vaccine which has successfully been tested on mice, and the country is ready to begin human testing soon, a media report said.

The Teravac-HIV-1 vaccine designed to fight AIDS is the result of cutting edge genetic engineering techniques, and has been presented to more than 600 scientists from 38 countries attending the 24th International Biotech Congress here, Juventud Rebelde Daily said Tuesday.


Eating cheese, milk could make you brainier

Eating cheese, milk could make you brainierLondon, March 6 - Dairy food could be essential for a healthy brain, a new study suggests.

The study, by US and Australian researchers, involving 1,000 adults, found those who regularly have dairy products such as milk, cheese and yoghurt score better on tests of mental ability than people who never, or rarely, consume dairy products, the Daily Mail reported.


Cuba showcases cancer vaccines

Cuba showcases cancer vaccinesHavana, March 6 - Cuba's biotechnology industry is showcasing the latest advances in the anti-cancer vaccines at the 29th Havana International Biotechnology Congress.

Monday's opening session was attended by 600 experts from 38 countries, the organizers said.


Roses smell better with open eyes

Roses smell better with open eyesWashington, Feb 290 : Next time you smell roses, try doing it with your eyes open to get the best aroma.

A new study has for the first time revealed that activating the brain’s visual cortex with a small amount of electrical stimulation actually improves our sense of smell.


Infertile women can still conceive

Infertile women can still conceiveSydney, Feb 21 - One in every four women with a history of infertility can still conceive without treatment, says new research.

The study, led by Danielle Herbert, from the University of Queensland School of Population Health, reveals that women who have been clinically diagnosed as infertile after 12 months of unsuccessfully trying for a baby may actually just need longer to conceive.


Our rational thinking is affected by bodily quirks

Our rational thinking is affected by bodily quirksWashington, Feb 15 - We are actually kidding ourselves when we take pride in our rational thinking - who knows when it may be hijacked by quirks.

One particularly powerful influence may be our own bodies, according to new research conducted by cognitive scientist Daniel Casasanto, from the New School for Social Research, New York.


'India's AIDS control mission a successful model'

India's AIDS control mission a successful modelNew Delhi, Feb 6 - In existence for nearly two decades, India's HIV-AIDS control mission has been the most successful global model to deal with the disease, the head of the country's AIDS control panel said Monday.


Silver ''bullet'' as effective as popular chemotherapy drug to treat cancer

Silver ''bullet'' as effective as popular chemotherapy drug to treat cancerWashington, Feb 3 : Silver is as efficient as a leading chemotherapy drug in treating cancer and may even have fewer side effects, a new study has revealed.

Results from the study at the University of Leeds, show that particular silver compounds are as toxic to cancer cells as the platinum-based drug Cisplatin, which is widely used to treat a range of cancers.


Pakistani province launches polio campaign

Pakistani province launches polio campaignIslamabad, Jan 30 - Over two million children will be administered anti-polio vaccine drops in Pakistan's Balochistan province, which saw the highest number of polio cases in the world in 2011.

A campaign against polio was launched Monday in 27 districts, where at least 73 children were affected by the virus last year, the Daily Times reported.


Treatment restores productivity among depressed employees

Treatment restores productivity among depressed employeesToronto, Jan 12 - Depressed employees become more productive after undergoing treatment than those who don't receive treatment, suggests a study.

The study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) examined data from a large-scale community survey of employed and recently employed people in Alberta.


Diet rich in slowly digested carbs cuts risk of cancers, heart disease

Diet rich in slowly digested carbs cuts risk of cancers, heart diseaseWashington, Jan 12 : A diet rich in slowly digested carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes and other high-fiber foods, significantly reduces markers of inflammation associated with chronic disease among overweight and obese adults, say researchers.

Such a “low-glycemic-load” diet, which does not cause blood-glucose levels to spike, also increases a hormone that helps regulate the metabolism of fat and sugar.


Our brain can tell real face from imitations

Our brain can tell real face from imitationsWashington, Jan 10 : Both the right and the left sides of the brain work together to tell a real face from a facial imitation, says a study co-authored by an Indian-born scientist.

Objects that resemble faces are everywhere. Whether it's New Hampshire's erstwhile granite 'Old Man of the Mountain', or Jesus' face on a tortilla, our brains are adept at locating images that look like faces.


Eye rich source of flexible adult stem cells

Eye rich source of flexible adult stem cellsWashington, Jan 9 - Patients need not look any further than their own eyes to obtain perfectly matched neural (nerve) stem cells, say scientists.

Researchers have identified adult stem cells of the central nervous system in a single layer of cells at the back of the eye. That layer, known as the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), underlies and supports photoreceptors in the light-sensitive retina. Without it, photoreceptors and vision are lost.


Manipulate bacteria to chat away infections

Manipulate bacteria to chat away infectionsWashington, Jan 4 - By manipulating how bacteria chat up one another, scientists could get rid of infections bedevilling the human flesh, reveals a study.

Texas A&M University researchers have achieved an unprecedented degree of control over the formation and dispersal of biofilms, with potentially significant health and industrial applications.


Syndicate content