Health News

Seaweed capsules for diabetics to make painful needle-pricks history

Seaweed capsules for diabetics to make painful needle-pricks historyWashington D.C, Dec 29 - Say goodbye to good old needles, as a team of scientists has come up with an alternative for the diabetics in the form of seaweed capsules.

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Here`s why Britain already hit 'peak obesity'

Here`s why Britain already hit 'peak obesity'London, Dec 28 - Britain has actually already reached peak obesity, according to Goldman Sachs analysis.

In its 100th edition of its Fortnightly Thoughts report, the company brought out a chart that shows those going to hospital in Britain that are related to obesity are dropping off, the Independent reported.

And Goldman Sachs pointed out the reason for this could be closely correlated to the fact Britain is consuming less calories than it used to.

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Cancer's 'social network' analysis offers hope for patients

Cancer's 'social network' analysis offers hope for patientsWashington D.C, Dec 26 - A team of scientists has developed a computer model that applies techniques used to analyse social networks to identify new ways of treating cancer.

The model analyses the unique behaviours of cancer-causing proteins, spotting what makes them different from normal proteins and mapping out molecular targets for new potential drugs that could be developed to treat cancer.

Govt. adds Cancer, HIV, Hepatitis C to list of essential medicines

Govt. adds Cancer, HIV, Hepatitis C to list of essential medicinesNew Delhi, Dec.26 - The Government has added 106 drugs including that of Cancer, HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C to the list of essential medicines.

The move will ensure their availability across the country at affordable prices. This also takes the total number of items in the list to 376.

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Fat-tissue hormone find brings hope for diabetics

Fat-tissue hormone find brings hope for diabeticsWashington D.C, Dec 24 - Soon, there might be a cure for type 2 diabetes just by targeting a fat-tissue hormone, according to a new study.

Researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues described the pre-clinical development of a therapeutic that could potentially be used to treat type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other metabolic diseases.

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Moms needs to be cautious while dealing with daughters' weight

Moms needs to be cautious while dealing with daughters' weightWashington D.C, Dec 23 - If you are a mother and are concerned about your daughter's health, then this is how you should support your daughter around her eating and her weight.

Mother should discuss issues of diet and weight with her daughter very carefully, according to Erin Hillard, a developmental psychology doctoral student at the University of Notre Dame.

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Money can actually buy you happiness!

Money can actually buy you happiness!Washington D.C., Dec. 22 - It's a good news for all the shopaholics, a recent study has found that material things can bring happiness.

Researchers from Society Personality and Social Psychology have shown that material purchases, from sweaters to skateboards, provide more frequent happiness over time, whereas experiential purchases, like a trip to the zoo, provide more intense happiness on individual occasions.

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Being 'lean and unfit' better than 'fat and fit'

Being 'lean and unfit' better than 'fat and fit'Washington D.C, Dec 21 Challenging the conventional wisdom, a team of researchers has busted the myth that you can be "fat but fit."

In contrast, the results from the new study suggest that the protective effects of high fitness against early death are reduced in obese people.

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To treat the heart, aim the gut

To treat the heart, aim the gutWashington D.C, Dec 20 - Giving a new meaning to the adage "the way to a man's heart is through his stomach," a new study shows that drugging the microbiome may be helpful in treating heart disease.

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Mentally stronger teens opt for vaping over smoking

Mentally stronger teens opt for vaping over smokingWashington D.C, Dec 19 : Amidst the booming e-cigarette trend, a team of researchers has found that the teens with moderate emotional health problems do not smoke, but they may vape.

Lead author Adam Leventhal from the University of Southern California said that mental health and behavioral problems such as alcohol and drug abuse are well-documented risk factors that push teens to smoke.

Dad's separation puts teens at depression risk

Dad's separation puts teens at depression riskWashington D.C, Dec 16 - Children can react very differently to separation or divorce of their parents and a new research, investigating the mental health of teens after their dads left, suggests that it can be pretty hard on them.

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Motherhood after 25 can keep you healthy at 40

Motherhood after 25 can keep you healthy at 40Washington D.C, Dec 15 - Delaying motherhood is better for your health as a new study has revealed that having your first baby between ages 25-35 is tied to being healthier at 40.

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Obesity, a poverty issue

Obesity, a poverty issueLondon, Dec 14 - A new study has found that poor children are three times more likely to be obese than the rich kids, suggesting that obesity and poverty go hand in hand.

Children who are overweight or obese are far more likely to suffer serious illnesses like Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer later in life, the Mirror reported.

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Micronutrient Initiative inks new partnership with UP Govt.

Micronutrient Initiative inks new partnership with UP Govt.New Delhi, Dec.13 - With support from the Government of Canada, the Micronutrient Initiative (MI) will invest Canadian dollars 5.5 million (around Rs.28 crores) over the next five years to improve the nutritional status and health of over 17 million women, children and adolescent girls in Uttar Pradesh.

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How your office can help you ward off diabetes

How your office can help you ward off diabetesWashington D.C, Dec 12 - Pre-diabetics, warding off diabetes could amount to just another day at the office as a recent study has revealed that workplace intervention leads to weight loss and better glucose control.

Two drinks a day keeps Alzheimer's death risk at bay

Two drinks a day keeps Alzheimer's death risk at bay Washington D.C, Dec 11 - According to a recent study, 2 to 3 units of alcohol a day can ward off an early death from Alzheimer's disease.

Moderate drinking has been associated with a lower risk of developing and dying from heart disease and stroke. But alcohol is known to damage brain cells, and given that dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder, drinking might be harmful in those with the condition.

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Spice it up to boost brain power

Spice it up to boost brain powerWashington D.C, Dec 11 - You may want to start spicing up your dishes as a recent study has suggested that a plant compound found in spices and herbs increases brain connections.

Plus-sized models fuelling obesity

Plus-sized models fuelling obesityWashington D.C, Dec 10 - As the spotlight on plus-size fashion is getting bigger and brighter, it is feared that its runway walkers may be fuelling obesity epidemics with their natural body shapes.

The increasing use of plus-sized models in advertising campaigns may be contributing to growing rates of obesity, according to the study from Simon Fraser University's Beedie School of Business.

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Want a sharper memory? Play more 3-D games

Want a sharper memory? Play more 3-D gamesWashington D.C., Dec. 9 - It's great news for gamers everywhere as it has been revealed that three-dimensional video games not only provide great fun, but can also boost the formation of memories, according to a new study.

Modified mosquitoes can halt malaria spread

Modified mosquitoes can halt malaria spreadWashington D.C, Dec 8 - A team of researchers playing God has come up with a new breed of genetically modified mosquito that could help wipe out malaria within years.

For the first time, malarial mosquitoes have been modified to be infertile and pass on the trait rapidly, raising the possibility of reducing the spread of disease.

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Aromatherapy-get beauty with a peck of nature

Aromatherapy-get beauty with a peck of nature New Delhi, Dec. 8 - With the changing time and beauty concepts, people are now going beyond instant beautification and are heading towards natural and rejuvenating solutions. Topping the list in the same is Aromatherapy as the use of essential oils is trending as a slow and steady way to beautify.

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`Meals on Wheels` cuts loneliness

`Meals on Wheels` cuts lonelinessWashington D.C, Dec 8 - According to a new study, home-delivered meals may be providing more than food security. They reduce loneliness.

When Congress passed the Older Americans Act in 1965 to support elderly people who were struggling, often alone, to continue to live at home, a major plank of the legislation provided for home delivery of meals to ensure their adequate nutrition.

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Groups that break bread together perform better

Groups that break bread together perform betterWashington D.C, Dec 8 - Breaking bread with colleagues not only improves social harmony at work, but according to a new study it also boosts productivity.

Plenty of companies invest big money to provide their employees with upscale workplace eateries or at least catered meals. But are those companies getting a good return on their investment? According to the Cornell University study, the answer is yes.

Epileptics likelier to commit suicide than others

Epileptics likelier to commit suicide than othersWashington D.C, Dec 7 - According to a new study, patients with epilepsy are more likely to commit suicide than the general population.

The analysis of data from the CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) found that the annual suicide mortality rate among those with epilepsy was about 16 percent higher than that seen in the general population, according to researcher Niu Tian and colleagues.

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Can this new toothcare regime make dentist's drill history?

Can this new toothcare regime make dentist's drill history?Washington D.C, Dec 7 - In the future, you may never have to face the dreaded dentist drill, as a new study has found a drill-free way of treating tooth decay.

The University of Sydney study has revealed that tooth decay (dental caries) can be stopped, reversed and prevented without the need for the traditional 'fill and drill' approach that has dominated dental care for decades.

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