New York

New method boon for kidney stone treatment

New method boon for kidney stone treatmentNew York, March 19 : The expanding waistlines of the citizens, increasing stress and humid conditions may have given rise, at least in part, to rising incidence of kidney stones in the world, but a way to ease the treatment of the disease has eluded the scientists for some time.


Fried foods leads to obesity in people with genetic risk

Fried foods leads to obesity in people with genetic riskNew York, March 19 - Eating fried food more than four times a week may have twice as big an effect on body mass index (BMI) for those with the highest genetic risk of developing obesity, research indicates.

In other words, genetic makeup can inflate the effects of bad diet.


Soon, a drill to dismantle bacteria from within

Soon, a drill to dismantle bacteria from withinNew York, March 18 - Imagine tiny drills that can puncture deadly bacteria or 'superbugs' that are anti-biotic resistant and send millions to hospitals worldwide.

Scientists are now building tiny 'molecular drill bits' that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls.

In humans and animals, naturally occurring, short strings of amino acids called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) fight against drug-resistant pathogens.


Vaginal gel holds promise against HIV after sex

Vaginal gel holds promise against HIV after sexNew York, March 14 - In what can be termed as a significant discovery in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, a vaginal gel has been developed that, if applied as long as three hours after sex, can protect monkeys from infection.

The gel has raltegravir, an FDA-approved anti-retroviral drug.

Three hours before it was inserted, the monkeys were given vaginal washes of simian HIV to simulate sex with an infected monkey.


Husbands' good health keep fights at bay among elderly

Husbands' good health keep fights at bay among elderlyNew York, March 14 - A husband’s attitude and good health appear crucial to preventing conflict among older couples who have been together for a long time, research shows.

Such characteristics in wives play less of a role in limiting marital conflict, perhaps because of different expectations among women and men in durable relationships, said a study from University of Chicago.


Spanking toddlers at home a worrisome trend: Study

Spanking toddlers at home a worrisome trend: StudyNew York, March 12 : Do you spank your baby often, little realising that this may lead to greater aggression, depression and other negative behaviour in his/her life later in life?

You are not alone in this disturbing trend that is catching up with the parents worldwide.

According to research, 30 percent of one-year-old children were spanked at least once in the past month by their mother, father or both parents.


Gut cells may give birth to insulin-making cells

Gut cells may give birth to insulin-making cellsNew York, March 12 - In a break-through for people suffering from diabetes, research has demonstrated that the intestinal cells could be an accessible and abundant source of functional insulin-producing cells.

Destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas is at the heart of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.


Hiding place of deadly virus in body spotted

Hiding place of deadly virus in body spottedNew York, March 12 - A common yet deadly virus that hides in specific places in healthy people and is hard to find has now been discovered.

Most adults harbour the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) that can cause severe illness and even death once their immune system is weakened or they are undergoing treatment for certain life-threatening diseases.


Healthy cells may be harbingers of lung cancer: Study

Healthy cellsNew York, March 10 : Seemingly healthy cells may, in fact, hide clues that lung cancer would later develop, an alarming study shows.

The researchers examined gene expression in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

It showed the area adjacent to tumours is rich with cancer markers.


3D technique brings hope for lung regeneration

3D technique brings hope for lung regenerationNew York, March 8 : In a ground-breaking discovery, scientists have created 3D techniques that can regenerate lungs from human stem cells.

Daniel Weiss, a professor of medicine at the University of Vermont, has developed lung tissue bioengineering technique that involves scaffold - or framework - of lungs from human corpse to engineer new lungs for patients with end-stage lung diseases.


Hunger for Facebook 'likes' propels eating disorder risk!

Hunger for Facebook 'likes' propels eating disorder risk!New York, March 6 - Apart from sharing party snaps, vacation videos and indefinite selfies, frequent Facebook users do run the risk of developing eating disorders, research shows.

And those hungry for 'likes' on the Facebook, reported the highest levels of disordered eating.


Anger might increase heart attack risk fivefold

Anger might increase heart attack risk fivefoldNew York, March 5 : The next time you get angry with a colleague or neighbour, take a deep breath instead of blowing your top, as during the two hours following angry outbursts your risk of a heart attack rises nearly five times, said a study.


First impressions are formed as early as three

New York, March 5 - Even your three-year-old toddler is capable of judging an individual’s character simply by looking at his/her face - meaning he does not require years of social experience to learn the art.

Just like adults, children as young as age three tend to judge traits like trustworthiness and competence simply by looking at the person’s face, research shows.


Binge drinking catastrophic for older drinkers

Binge drinking catastrophic for older drinkersNew York, March 4 - Among older moderate drinkers, those who binge have a significantly greater mortality risk than their compatriots, new research shows.

Binge drinking is increasingly being recognised as a significant public health concern worldwide.


Binge drinking ups mortality risk in older boozers

Binge drinking ups mortality risk in older boozersWashington, March 4 : Researchers studying the link between binge drinking and death rate among older moderate drinkers have found that binge-drinking older tipsters are more than two times higher odds of 20-year mortality as compared to regular moderate drinkers.

For this study, researchers used data from a larger project examining late-life patterns of alcohol consumption and drinking problems.


Can ancient Chinese tree extract treat pancreatic cancer?

Can ancient Chinese tree extract treat pancreatic cancer?New York, March 3 : The bark of an ancient Chinese tree holds promise in the fight against pancreatic cancer - with the potential to make inroads against several more variants of the disease.

Led by an Indian-origin scientist, a team at University of Texas' (UT) Health Science Centre has already explored the use of extract from the Amur cork tree's bark in treating prostate cancer.


Beware! Stethoscopes more contaminated than hands

Beware! Stethoscopes more contaminated than handsNew York, Feb 28 : What is more contaminated in hospitals, doctors' hands or his stethoscope? Research indicates towards the latter.

Although healthcare workers' hands are the main source of bacterial transmission in hospitals, physicians' stethoscopes appear to play a role.


A handshake can tell cancer survival rates

A handshake can tell cancer survival ratesNew York, Feb 27 : Can a simple handshake predict survival rates in cancer patients? Yes, asserts research.

It says that handgrip strength may be linked to a person's ability to fight disease. Concordia professor Robert Kilgour and his colleagues from McGill recognised the simple squeeze as an important diagnostic tool in assessing strength and quality of life among critical care patients.


Know why you have poor memory for sound

Know why you have poor memory for soundNew York, Feb 27 : Again forgot grocery items your wife asked over phone to pick up on way back from office? You are not alone.

When it comes to memory, we do not remember things we hear nearly as well as things we see or touch, reveals research.

"As it turns out, there is merit to the Chinese proverb 'I hear, and I forget; I see, and I remember'," chuckled lead author James Bigelow from University of Iowa (UI).


3D device that can predict an impending heart attack

3D device that can predict an impending heart attackNew York, Feb 26 - Soon, an implantable 3D device can deliver treatment or predict an impending heart attack before a patient shows any physical symptoms.

Using an inexpensive 3D printer, biomedical engineers are developing a custom-fitted device with embedded sensors that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders.


Vitamin A holds promise in combating TB

Vitamin A holds promise in combating TBNew York, Feb 26 - Tuberculosis, the 'ticking time bomb' that affects two billion people worldwide and causes an estimated 2 million deaths annually, may have a saviour in vitamin A.

Researchers at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), investigating the role of nutrients in helping the immune system fight against major infections, found that vitamin A may play an important role combating TB.


BP reading in both arms key for healthy heart: Study

BP reading in both arms key for healthy heart: StudyNew York, Feb 26 - In a significant news for blood pressure (BP) patients and doctors alike, researchers have suggested to take BP reading in both arms, rather than the present system of measuring BP using one arm, for better cardiovasvular health.

The difference in interarm systolic blood pressure - where both arms are used for BP reading - has now been linked to greater risk of future cardiovascular events.


Can vinegar be used to treat tuberculosis?

Can vinegar be used to treat tuberculosis?New York, Feb 25 : An international team of researchers has found that an active ingredient in vinegar can effectively kill mycobacteria, even the highly drug-resistant mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Acetic acid in vinegar might be used as an inexpensive and non-toxic disinfectant against drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria as well as other stubborn, disinfectant-resistant mycobacteria, they found.


Camels carry deadly virus: Study

Camels carry deadly virus: StudyNew York, Feb 25 : In a startling revelation, researchers have found the deadly coronavirus - responsible for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) - among camels.

MERS, a serious viral respiratory illness, has been identified in 182 people since 2012, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Nearly 79 people have died from the condition.

“Our study shows the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is widespread,” said W. Ian Lipkin of Columbia University, New York.


Decoded: How your facial expressions mirror your mother

Decoded: How your facial expressions mirror your motherNew York, Feb 25 : Know why your new born's dark eyes resemble your wife or his/her charming smile reminds you of teenaged days?

This resemblance is not pre-determined but happened randomly between two copies of every gene for a given trait - one from mom, the other from dad.

In general, both copies of a gene are switched on or off as an embryo develops into an adult.


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