New York

Test to detect early onset of heart attacks

Test to detect early onset of heart attacksNew York, Jan 10 - Currently, there is no predictive test for patients who exhibit symptoms but are yet to experience a heart attack.

This could change soon.

Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in California, US, have invented a new 'fluid biopsy' technique that could identify patients at high risk of a heart attack by identifying specific cells as markers in the bloodstream.


Indian-origin scientist finds way to treat deadly malaria

Indian-origin scientist finds way to treat deadly malariaNew York, Jan 10 - A common but dangerous strain of malaria that hides in the liver, re-emerging years later to trigger new infections and is harder to prevent, diagnose and treat, can soon be treated.


US woman set to give birth to own granddaughter

Lorena McKinnonNew York, Jan 9 : A woman in Utah, America, will soon become a grandmother - after she gives birth to her own granddaughter.

After Julia Navarro's daughter, Lorena McKinnon, who had been struggling with fertility issues, was unable to find a gestational surrogate, her 58-year-old mother offered to carry the baby, the New York Post reported.


Simple blood test can detect cervical cancer

Simple blood test can detect cervical cancerNew York, Jan 9 - In a ground-breaking research, scientists have confirmed a more convenient, non-invasive test for detecting and staging cervical cancer.

Researchers at University of Louisville in Kentucky, US, found that using the heat profile from a person’s blood - called a plasma thermogram - can serve as an indicator for the presence or absence of cervical cancer, including the stage of cancer.


Boost for drug efficacy in treating key heart disease

Boost for drug efficacy in treating key heart diseaseNew York, Jan 8 : There is a heartening news for those suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) - a cardiovascular disease.

Seeking ways to boost drug efficacy, an international team of researchers have determined that an intravenous tissue-penetrating peptide enhances the activity of pulmonary drugs, said a new research published in the American Journal of Pathology.


Chemical in water bottle increases prostate cancer risk

Chemical in water bottle increases prostate cancer riskNew York, Jan 8 - Forget about the quality of water. A mere contact with the water bottle can be life-threatening.

A commonly used plasticiser found in products such as water bottles, soup can liners and paper receipts, can increase the risk for prostate cancer later in life, said a study.


Learn how muscles help burn fat during exercise

Learn how muscles help burn fat during exerciseNew York, Jan 8 - Ever thought what helps burn fat across your body while exercising?

According to a study, it is a molecule in our muscles that is produced during exercise and contributes to the beneficial effects of exercise on metabolism.


Ear tube surgery not a long-term solution

Ear tube surgery not a long-term solutionNew York, Jan 7 - Ear tube surgery can certainly improve hearing in the short term but may not help in long-term hearing, speech, language, or other functional outcomes in normally developing children.


Key protein behind breast cancer's spread to brain

Key protein behind breast cancer's spread to brainNew York, Jan 7 - In a major breakthrough, a cancer-research team has identified a protein that may be the crucial reason behind breast cancer spreading to the brain.

Using cell models, the researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that breast cancer cells harness a protein called alphaB-crystallin to help them stick to endothelial cells that line the small blood vessels in the brain.


'No discount' threat pushes people to buy health food

'No discount' threat pushes people to buy health foodNew York, Jan 7 - What would you choose if given an option by your neighbourhood super mart: Hike your healthy food purchases or lose monthly discounts?

People are more likely to choose healthy options at the grocery store if they are told to risk losing their monthly healthy food discount, said a new research.


Patients now endorsing key stem cell research

Patients now endorsing key stem cell researchNew York, Jan 6 - Despite some ethical concerns, most patients are now broadly endorsing stem cell research.

In the case of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are stem cells made from skin or other tissues, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University found patients were largely in favour of participating in iPSC research even if personal benefit was unlikely.


Breakthrough for type-2 diabetes: Indian-origin scientist

Breakthrough for type-2 diabetes: Indian-origin scientistNew York, Jan 5 - If a single gene is not functioning properly, insulin is not released into the bloodstream to regulate blood sugar levels - leading to type 2 diabetes, claims a scientist of Indian origin.


Brutal cold makes post-vacation depression worse

Brutal cold makes post-vacation depression worseNew York, Jan 5 - Ever thought why going to office Monday after a long holiday becomes a daunting task, especially in this bone-chilling cold?

Blame it on seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

The first working day after the holidays can be a depressing time for people coping with a post-holiday letdown and a type of depression triggered by short days called SAD, revealed a new study.


Skin blisters may lead to stroke in young

Skin blisters may lead to stroke in youngNew York, Jan 3 - Having shingles - painful, blistering skin rashes - may increase the risk of having a stroke years later.

"Anyone with shingles, and especially younger people, should be screened for stroke risk factors. Studies are needed to determine whether vaccination can also reduce the incidence of stroke and heart attack,” said study author Judith Breuer of University College London.


Vitamin E slows Alzheimer's progression

Vitamin E slows Alzheimer's progressionNew York, Jan 1 - A daily dosage of vitamin E can slow functional decline and reduce caregiver time in assisting Alzheimer's patients.

Researchers have found that alpha tocopherol - a fat-soluble vitamin (E) and antioxidant - in patients with moderately severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) was shown to be effective in slowing clinical progression.


Wrong habits may cause sleepless nights

Wrong habits may cause sleepless nightsNew York, Dec 31 - Habits like reading a book or keeping your mouth minty fresh may affect your sleep.

Huffingtonpost. com shares some of the habits that are likely to spoil a sound sleep:

* You're an inconsistent eater: Studies show inconsistent eating habits can have a negative impact on sleep later in the day. If you have dinner later in the evening, it's okay as long as you stick with it, every day. If not, skip the unexpected dessert.


`Clinical studies on multi-vitamin requirements flawed'

`Clinical studies on multi-vitamin requirements flawed'New York, Dec 31 - Most modern clinical studies don't do baseline analysis to identify nutritional inadequacies or assess whether supplements have remedied those inadequacies - leaving your doctor not to prescribe you any multi-vitamin tablet while you may actually need one daily.


Key protein may eradicate rare soft-tissue cancer

keyNew York, Dec 30 : A rare soft-tissue cancer may be eradicated simply by inhibiting a key protein involved in its growth, research suggests.

Scientists have found that inhibiting the action of a protein called BRD4 caused cancer cells to die in a mouse model of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs).


Maths to rescue patients with organ transplant

organ transplantNew York, Dec 30 : Those who hate maths should know this -- a mathematical model is here to improve the success rate of organ transplants.

The researchers are now working towards designing a tool capable of preventing rejection rate in organ transplants.

They created a mathematical algorithm that would indicate for each person - using their genetics, size, age, current medication and time since the transplant - what should be their immuno-suppressive drug dosage.


Surgery, not chemo, better for tongue cancer

Surgery, not chemo, better for tongue cancerNew York, Dec 27 : Surgery, and not chemotherapy sessions, works better for those suffering from tongue or oral cavity cancer.

In a pathbreaking study, a team of scientists at the University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center concluded that patients with tongue cancer who started their treatment with chemotherapy fared significantly worse than patients who received surgery first.


Can anti-inflammatory drugs help reduce angry outbursts?

Can anti-inflammatory drugs help reduce angry outbursts?New York, December 20 : People suffering from recurrent and uncontrollable outbursts have significantly higher levels of inflammation, it has been revealed.

Research has revealed that there is a high link between intermittent explosive disorder and inflammation and the study has suggested that anti-inflammatory drugs may help in controlling the condition, the New York Daily News reported.


High sugar ups risk of breast cancer

High sugar ups risk of breast cancerNew York, Dec 19 - If you are obese or diabetic and have not yet had your breasts examined, it’s time to visit the doctor.

Scientists have now discovered why high blood sugar coupled with diseases such as obesity and diabetes can raise the risk of breast and other cancers.


Meet the Chinese man born with heart in abdomen

Meet the Chinese man born with heart in abdomenNew York, Nov 29 - A Chinese man was born with his heart in his abdomen and is hoping that doctors will put it in the right place.

Ho Zhiliang is suffering from congenital cardiac exposure syndrome, where his heart is seen visible right below the skin of his abdomen, the New York Daily News reported.


Baby miraculously comes back to life after being declared dead for 10 hrs

Baby miraculously comes back to life after being declared dead for 10 hrsNew York, Nov 19 : A newborn baby was declared dead after 35 minutes of his birth but was found to be alive, when her father came to collect her body after 10 hours.

The Columbian baby, now-named Milagros, which means "miracles", was born prematurely at St. Francis hospital in Quibdo.

The mother, Jenny Hurtado was only 27 weeks pregnant, when she was rushed to the hospital, the New York Daily News reported.


'Eating lunch al desko' makes workers consume more calories

'Eating lunch al desko' makes workers consume more caloriesNew York, Nov 15 - A new survey has found that workers who eat lunch at their desk consume more calories and snacks than those who dine out.

The poll from Forza Supplements found that more than a third of workers who "dined al desko" ate more than 1,200 calories during a typical working day, the New York Daily News reported.


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