Sweden

Caffeine tied to low birth weight babies

Caffeine tied to low birth weight babiesStockholm, Feb 19 - Caffeine, the primary constituent of coffee has been found to be associated with low birth weight babies and may also prolong pregnancy, says a Swedish study.

A research team from the Norwegian Institute for Public Health, investigated the impact of maternal caffeine during pregnancy on babies, relying on information about mother's diet and birth details collected over 10 years.


Middle-aged women cope with burnout in different ways

Middle-aged women cope with burnout in different waysStockholm, Jan 18 : Middle-aged women cope with burnout, which is caused by a prolonged exposure to stress, in different ways, says a Swedish study.

Burnout involves emotional, physical and mental exhaustion, manifesting as poor sleep, depression, anxiety, even cardiovascular and immune disorders among other symptoms.


Stroke drug kills bugs behind ulcers, TB

Stroke drug kills bugs behind ulcers, TBStockholm, Dec 21 : A drug used in treating ischemic strokes may help kill bugs that cause gastric ulcers and tuberculosis (TB). Ischemic stroke occurs when an artery to the brain is blocked.

The study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden says a compound called ebselen effectively inhibits the thioredoxin reductase system in a wide variety of bugs, including H. pylori, which causes gastric ulcers, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB.


Learning a language pushes brain growth

Learning a language pushes brain growthStockholm, Oct 9 : Learning new languages is a good way to keep the brain in shape and could encourage your brain to grow, shows a study.

A group of researchers had an almost unique opportunity to observe what happens to the brain when we learn a new language in a short period of time.

Young recruits at the Swedish Armed Forces Interpreter Academy pick up a new language very fast, 13 months to be exact.


Chewing linked to lowered dementia risk

Chewing linked to lowered dementia riskStockholm, Oct 5 - If you can bite into an apple, then you are more likely to maintain mental abilities and keep dementia at bay, according to a new research.

The older we become the more likely it is that we risk deterioration of our cognitive functions, such as memory, decision-making and problem solving.

Several studies have also demonstrated a link between not having teeth and loss of cognitive function and a higher risk of dementia.


Antibiotics to cure appendicitis

Antibiotics to cure appendicitisStockholm, Sep 27 - Antibiotics may replace invasive surgery in the treatment of acute appendicitis involving the removal of the appendix and could be just as effective, a new Swedish study suggests.

Appendicitis is a serious condition involving the appendix (a tube-shaped sac attached to and opening into the lower end of the large intestine), which becomes inflamed and painful, causing abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and fever.


Test to predict premature births discovered

Test to predict premature births discoveredStockholm, Sep 21 - Researchers have developed a new method to predict premature births, based on a new blood test that looks at two specific proteins, combined with an established ultrasound examination to measure the length of the cervix.


Sound levels in ICUs exceed WHO limits

Sound levels in ICUs exceed WHO limitsStockholm, Sep 18 - Tending to the seriously ill in intensive care units (ICUs) requires pin-drop silence, but current noise levels there ranged between 51-55 dB which is comparable to noise levels at a busy road, says a European study. It exceeds WHO recommendations by more than 20 dB.


Women suffer high rates of sleep apnea: Study

Women suffer high rates of sleep apnea: StudyStockholm, Aug 16 - Women suffer from high rates of sleep apnoea, a condition marked by frequent pauses in breathing during sleep, despite the disorder being linked predominantly with males.

The study from Uppsala and Umea Universities also suggest that women with hypertension and/or obesity were more likely to experience sleep apnoea.


Stroke hits women harder than men, says study

Stroke hits women harder than men, says studyStockholm, July 26 - A stroke in any form hits women harder than men, robbing them of the very meaning of life, says a study from Sweden.

Researchers at Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, asked all patients attending an out-patient clinic over a 16-month period to complete the Nottingham health profile, a generic quality of life survey used to measure subjective physical, emotional and social aspects of health.


Half of inhaled diesel soot sticks to lungs

Half of inhaled diesel soot sticks to lungsStockholm, June 29 - The exhaust from diesel-run vehicles, wood fires and coal fired power stations contains soot particles that not only pollute the air, but more dangerously, stick to human lungs, says a study.

Now for the first time, Lund University researchers have shown in a detailed study how more than half of all inhaled diesel soot particles remain in the body.


Low-fat dairy foods can lower stroke risk

Low-fat dairy foods can lower stroke riskStockholm, April 20 - People who drink low-fat milk and eat low-fat curd and cheese have a lowered stroke risk compared to those who consume full-fat dairy foods, says a new study.

Researchers who surveyed 74,961 adults aged 45 to 83 found that those who ate low-fat dairy foods had a 12 percent lower risk of stroke and a 13 percent lower risk of ischemic stroke (when an artery to the brain is blocked) than those who ate high-fat dairy foods.


Hypnosis effective in treating irritable bowels

Hypnosis effective in treating irritable bowelsStockholm, April 3 : Hypnosis can be highly effective in treating the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), characterised by abdominal pain, abdominal distension and bloating.

Studies based on 346 patients conducted by The Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden, showed that hypnotherapy alleviated symptoms in 40 percent of those affected - and that the improvement was long-term.


Music de-stresses, evokes positive emotions

Music de-stresses, evokes positive emotionsStockholm, March 6 : Listening to music daily can evoke positive emotions and bring down your stress levels, being a simple and effective way to enhance well-being and health.

The thesis is based partly on a survey study involving 207 individuals, partly on an intervention study where an group of 21 people listened to self-chosen music for 30 minutes daily for two weeks while a similarly sized group got to relax without music.


Stroke leaves victims exposed to malnutrition risk

Stroke leaves victims exposed to malnutrition riskStockholm, Feb 17 - A stroke could leave you with eating problems, with more than half risking malnutrition even three months after the attack.

Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, studied 36 stroke patients, assessing them in hospital for an average of five days.


Turmeric-based drug being tested against Alzheimer's

Turmeric-based drug being tested against Alzheimer'sStockholm, Feb 15 - Curcumin, a compound of turmeric commonly used in Indian curries, prolongs life and boosts activity of fruit flies with a nervous disorder similar to Alzheimer's disease that afflicts millions of older people across the world.


Quality of life may be lowered by vertebral fractures

Quality of life may be lowered by vertebral fracturesResearchers in Sweden have said that a vertebral fracture, fracture of the spine usually associated with major trauma, has a devastating impact on quality of life.


Young may be rewarded with stronger bones when they get old if they do exercise

Young may be rewarded with stronger bones when they get old if they do exerciseThose who exercise when young may be rewarded with stronger bones when old, Swedish researchers have said.

It has been suggested by researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden that those in exercise programs when young build stronger bones and may lower their risk of osteoporosis.


Online therapy can treat depression: Study

Online therapy can treat depression: Study  Stockholm, April 13 : The online Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is as effective in treating panic disorder and depression as the traditional group-based method, a new study has found.

"Internet-based CBT is also more cost-effective than group therapy," said Jan Bergstrom, a researcher with the Center for Psychiatry Research at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institute (KI).


Skin creams can make skin drier

Skin creams can make skin drier Stockholm - Not all skin creams give the required effect, and can in fact make the skin drier, according to research conducted at the Uppsala University in Sweden.

Researcher Izabela Buraczewska has studied what happens in the skin at the molecular level the effects of various creams.


Violence against women impacts growth and health of infants

Violence against women impacts growth and health of infantsStockholm - Children's growth and health are also impacted by violence against their mothers, a new Swedish study suggests.

The study by a paediatrician at Uppsala University indicated that the children had lower weight at birth, grew less as infants and toddlers and were also more likely to take ill.


Study: Refraining from smoking a month before surgery is beneficial

Study: Refraining from smoking a month before surgery is beneficialStockholm - Smokers who refrain from smoking at least four weeks before undergoing surgery reduce their risks of sustaining complications after the procedure, according to a new study.

Smokers are more likely to suffer from postoperative complications including infections of the operation wound or from wounds that heal poorly than other patients.


Sweden launches measures after first bluetongue case

Blue TongueStockholm - Swedish authorities Monday launched a series of measures after the first case of a livestock disease known as bluetongue was diagnosed over the weekend in two cows in south- western Sweden.

The National Board of Agriculture banned all transport of cattle, goats, sheep, and deer from a 20-kilometre zone around the farm in Halland where two cows tested positive for bluetongue disease.


Research: Women sex offenders have high levels of mental illness

Stockholm  - A study of women convicted of sexual offences in Sweden suggests that mental problems and drug addiction were common, researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institute said Wednesday.

The survey of 93 women who were convicted in Sweden of sexual offences between 1988 and 2000 indicated that 37 per cent of the women had been treated at a psychiatric clinic during the period, and 8 per cent had been diagnosed as having a psychosis.

During the same period, 8,500 men were convicted of sexual offences.


Sweden to lower bird flu alert level

Stockholm  - Swedish authorities Friday said they would lower the alert level for bird flu from next week, saying there had been no reports of increased deaths among poultry or wild fowl.

The Board of Agriculture said the protection level would be lowered from level 2 to 1, meaning that poultry and other bird exhibitions and competitions will be allowed.

Ducks and geese were however to be kept apart from other poultry, the board said.


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