Washington

Bangladesh to use new technology to double efficiency of urea fertilizer use

Washington, Dec 19: The Government of Bangladesh has announced that it will expand urea deep placement (UDP)—a technology that doubles the efficiency of urea fertilizer use to almost 1 million hectares (ha) of rice land, reaching about 1.6 million farm families, in the coming dry season.

The Ministry of Agriculture of Bangladesh has requested that IFDC (An International Center for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development) help implement the expanded project.

General: 
Regions: 

Our brains are genetically wired to recognise faces and places

Washington, Dec 19 : A new study of twins has revealed that our brains are genetically wired to recognise faces and places.

It also indicted that the genetic basis of the brain’s ability to recognize faces and places is much stronger than for other objects, such as words.

The findings are some of the first evidence demonstrating the role of genetics in assigning these functions to specific regions of the brain.

General: 
Regions: 

Here’s how ants became the most successful invasive species

Washington, December 19 : A consortium of researchers from the University of Illinois and the University of California at San Diego has shed light on how the Argentine ant Linepithema humile became one of the most successful invasive species in the world, and colonized parts of five continents besides its native range in South America.

The researchers say that the Argentine ant’s traits like being tiny, aggressive, and adaptable have helped it in its transit around the world.

General: 
Regions: 

Now, a device that converts harmful CO2 emissions into fuel cells

Washington, Dec 19: Researchers have developed a new device that uses sunlight and steam to neutralize carbon dioxide and ultimately turn it into a clean energy source, such as hydrogen.

Known as the “Sunshine to Petrol project”, this technique was developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

According to a report by Discovery News, this technique could appeal to big CO2 emitters like factories and power plants, which could potentially increase their revenues by producing another fuel source from a gas otherwise wasted into the atmosphere.

General: 
Regions: 

Arthritis and cancer treatment may be promising diabetes treatment

Washington, Dec 19: An antibody used in the treatment of certain cancers and rheumatoid arthritis may be a promising treatment for diabetes, say researchers at the Yale School of Medicine.

The boffins conducted a test on mice using the antibody, rituximab (anti-CD20), which depletes B cells that have been found to play a role in autoimmune diseases by interacting with T cells of the immune system.

T cells destroy insulin-producing cells directly in the pancreas, leading to type 1 diabetes.

General: 
Regions: 

A cold shower may be the best way to beat your blues

Washington, Dec 19: Got the blues? Then, why don’t you try a cold shower, for a new study has suggested that a simple cold-water bath might sometimes cure, and even prevent, the unbearable mood disorder.

The study, led by Nikolai Shevchuk, believes that the biological explanation of the new therapy revolves around a part of the brainstem known, appropriately enough, as the locus ceruleus, or "blue spot. "

Shevchuk said that short, cold showers might stimulate the blue spot, which is the brain's primary source of noradrenaline, a chemical that could help mediate depression.

General: 
Regions: 

Intensive training can fuel repair in brain, spinal cord post injury

Washington, Dec 19: Researchers at the University of Alberta have revealed that intensive rehabilitation training for patients with spinal cord injuries can stimulate repair in the brain and spinal cord.

They believe that these new branches growing from severed nerve fibres, along with compensating changes in the brain that would help in restoring hand function and the ability to walk.

The research led by Karim Fouad showed significant benefits of rehabilitation training after a cervical spinal cord injury.

General: 
Regions: 

Top 10 advances in materials science revealed

Washington, December 19 : A list of the top ten most significant advances in materials science over the last 50 years has been compiled by Materials Today magazine.

Jonathan Wood, the editor of the magazine, has revealed that the top ten items on the list include advances that have altered people’s daily lives.

He says while some of the items have completely changed the research arena, others have opened up new possibilities and capabilities.

General: 
Regions: 

Unsupervised children turn out healthier and more sociable

Washington, Dec 19 : Children who are allowed to go out unsupervised grow up to be healthier and more sociable, according to a new study.

The study, led by Professor Roger Mackett of the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering at the University College London, found that kids who are permitted to leave the house without an adult supervision are more active and enjoy a richer social life than those who are constantly supervised.

General: 
Regions: 

Researchers pave the way for new generation of cochlear implants

Washington, December 19 : Rutgers University researchers have made a discovery that may help introduce significant improvement in cochlear implants.

Cochlear implants today operate with varying degrees of success in different patients. While some facilitate the hearing of sounds like the rush of traffic or the crash of thunder, others provide even better hearing response such as detecting voice and understanding speech while still being unable to appreciate music.

General: 
Regions: 

Vacuuming is the best way to get rid of fleas

Washington, Dec 18: Researchers Ohio State University have determined that vacuuming kills fleas in all stages of their lives, with an average of 96 percent success in adult fleas and 100 percent destruction of younger.

The studies were conducted on the cat flea, or Ctenocephalides felis, the most common type of flea plaguing companion animals and humans.

Researchers also tested vacuum bags for toxicity and exposed fleas to churning air in separate tests to further explore potential causes of flea death.

General: 
Regions: 

Here’s how fat is stored in cells

Washington, Dec 18: Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified how fat is stored in cells.

In discovering the genes responsible for storing fat, researchers have answered one of the most fundamental questions in biology and is bound to lead to new strategies to treat obesity and many other conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, where fat metabolism goes awry.

Regions: 

Second-hand smoke at early infancy raises kids’ allergy risk

Washington, Dec 18: A new research has found that breathing in second-hand tobacco smoke in early infancy boosts the risk of developing allergies.

The findings of the research, carried out on more than 4000 families, are based on the parental survey responses about their children’s allergies, the different kinds of environment they had been exposed to before and after birth.

Among them, parental smoking, pet dander (animal hair and dead skin), and foodstuffs, were included.

Diseases: 
Regions: 

Constipation is the most common cause of kids’ abdominal pain

Washington, Dec 18: A new study by University of Iowa researchers has shown that the most common cause of abdominal pain among children is acute and chronic constipation.

The study also recommended that doctors should do a simple rectal examination for constipation when trying to find out the cause of abdominal pain in kids.

The findings, which were based on medical records of 962 children ages 4 to nearly 18, showed that constipation together accounted for nearly half of all cases of acute abdominal pain in children treated at one hospital.

Diseases: 
Regions: 

Scientists discover treasure trove of human, plant and animal fossils in Bahamas “blue hole”

Washington, Dec 18: Scientists have discovered human bones in a deep underwater cave in the Bahamas Islands, which might be of the first known human being in the region, among a treasure trove of other plant and animal fossils.

Known as Sawmill Sink, this underwater cave contains well-preserved fossils, including the remains of an ancient terrestrial crocodile, tortoises and other marine creatures previously unknown to exist in the West Indies.

General: 
Regions: 

Severe psoriasis linked to increased risk of death

Washington, Dec 18: A recent study has revealed that people with severe psoriasis may have greater risk of death compared to those without the condition.

The common inflammatory disorder that affects the skin and joints has been associated with various other factors, including smoking, alcohol use, obesity, cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

Diseases: 
Regions: 

Hot spot on Saturn's moon may harbour conditions germane for life

Washington, Dec 18: New data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens Mission has detected a hot spot on Enceladus, the tiny satellite of Saturn, which has raised intriguing possibilities of whether or not life exists on its surface.

The moon Enceladus is only 500 kilometers wide - roughly 300 miles wide, the distance between St. Louis and Chicago.

Data from Cassini has revealed a rock-rich body, 55 to 60 percent rock by mass, with a surface of nearly pure water ice.

General: 
Regions: 

Shorter legs raise risk of liver disease

Washington, Dec 18: Having short legs may not be a good thing, especially for your liver say researchers who found that there is a link between short legs and an increased risk of liver disease.

This research adds to the evidence linking leg length and health and is based on nearly 4300 women between the ages of 60 and 79, who had been randomly selected from 23 British towns.

The researchers measured standing and seated height to include leg and trunk length, and took blood samples in order to measure levels of four liver enzymes, ALT, GGT, AST and ALP.

Diseases: 
Regions: 

The Nile once flowed near ancient Egyptian temple at Karnak: experts

Washington: A series of discoveries at the foot of Egypt's famous Temple of Amun at Karnak have led archaeologists to believe that the river Nile once flowed near the temple.

The discoveries include ancient ceremonial baths, a pharaoh's private entry ramp, and the remains of a massive wall built some 3,000 years ago that reinforce what was then the bank of the Nile River.

General: 
Regions: 

Common antibiotic may help treat patients with difficult asthma

Washington, Dec 18: A collaborative study has shown that a commonly available antibiotic, macrolide, can improve the quality of life of patients with difficult asthma, and may also generate significant health care savings.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Newcastle and Hunter New England Health in collaboration with the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Viruses, Infections/Immunity, Vaccines and Asthma (VIVA) Research Program, has indicated that macrolide antibiotics could prove a successful therapy in conjunction with current asthma treatment.

Diseases: 
Regions: 

Images of 11 billion year-old galaxies suggest galactic formation occurred earlier than believed

Washington, Dec 18: A team of Japanese astronomers has obtained images of galaxies dating 11 billion years, which indicates that a majority of galactic formation occurred earlier than previously estimated.

The images have been captured using innovative technology and instrumentation on the Subaru Telescope by astronomers from the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ).

General: 
Regions: 

Pages