Research

Romance, fear could make you change your mind

Romance, fear could make you change your mindWashington, Mar 24: Feeling scared or amorous can greatly change the way people make decisions, claims a new study.

According to Vladas Griskevicius, professor of marketing at the University of Minnesota''s Carlson School of Management, everyday people are confronted with innumerable pieces of information and hundreds of decisions.

Unsurprisingly, people often process each piece of information deeply, instead relying on quick mental shortcuts to guide their behaviors.

Compound used by TV crime detectives helps detect immune inflammation in mice

Compound used by TV crime detectives helps detect immune inflammation in miceLondon, March 23: A compound used by TV show detectives to make blood glow, known as luminol, is now being used by scientists to highlight the sites where the immune system attacks the body’s own tissues.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that injected luminol glows blue at sites of active immune inflammation in living mice.

The researchers say that this glow can be detected from outside the mice with the aid of scientific cameras.

Honeybees and bumblebees prefer flying shortest distance between two flowers

Honeybees and bumblebees prefer flying shortest distance between two flowersWashington, March 21: Insects like honeybees and bumblebees prefer the shortest distance when they have to fly from one flower to another, according to an American study.

S. Alan Walters of Southern Illinois University and Jonathan R. Schultheis of North Carolina State University came to this conclusion after studying their pollinator movements down and across rows in watermelon, by tracking pollen flow.

Lab-on-a-Chip may help study how cancer cells detach from neighbouring tissue to spread disease

Lab-on-a-Chip may help study how cancer cells detach from neighbouring tissue to spread diseaseLondon, March 19: Johns Hopkins engineers say that they have developed a new lab-on-a-chip that can lead to better cancer therapies.

The researchers say that their invention may help figure out how cancer cells break free from neighbouring tissue, an "escape" that can spread the disease to other parts of the body.

How brain remembers single events

 How brain remembers single eventsWashington, Mar 19: One-time events—like a marriage proposal, a wedding toast, a baby’s birth—always hold that special place in our memory, and scientists have now found how brain remembers such events without them being repeated over time.

In a study on rats, UC Irvine scientists have found that a single brief experience was as effective at activating neurons and genes associated with memory as more repetitive activities.

Computer learning-electrical stimulation combo may give paralysed people better muscle control

Computer learning-electrical stimulation combo may give paralysed people better muscle controlWashington, March 19: A University of Florida researcher that paralysed people can be enabled to control their limbs in more precise and life-like manner by combining computer learning technology with electrical stimulation, a simple technique that has been in use for decades to prompt muscles to contract.

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