Research

Working in night shifts has no impact on breast cancer probability: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 7 : A recent research has found that working in night shifts has little or no effect on a woman's breast cancer risk.

This comes despite a review in 2007 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifying shift work disrupting the 'body clock' as a probable cause of cancer.

The research by following 1.4 million women in ten studies and seeing if they developed breast cancer examined whether night shift work increased women's breast cancer risk.

Ruth Travis, the study's lead author, said: "We found that women who had worked night shifts, including long-term night shifts, were not more likely to develop breast cancer, either in the three new UK studies or when we combined results from all 10 studies that had published relevant data."

Patients diagnosed with HIV infection at advanced stage are more likely to transmit it

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 7 : A new research at the University of California has found that patients diagnosed late in the course of HIV infection are more likely to transmit HIV to others since they are

not on treatment to suppress it and could be transmitting the disease without knowing they are doing so.

Further, these patients are at an increased risk of negative health outcomes such as premature death, increased risk of HIV transmission, and opportunistic infections such as Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and toxoplasmosis.

Lead researcher Brandon Brown and his team examined the prevalence and risk factors for county residents who have an AIDS diagnosis within 12 months of their first HIV-positive test.

Vitamin E may prevent non-smoking men from pneumonia

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 6 : A recent research conducted at the University of Helsinki states that consumption of Vitamin E may prevent the risk of pneumonia in non-smoking, middle-aged men.

The researchers studied whether Vitamin E supplementation might influence the risk of community-acquired pneumonia.

They analyzed the data of the randomized trial (Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention [ATBC] Study) which was conducted in Finland between 1985-1993 and included male smokers aged from 50 to 69 years.

The age when the participant started to smoke significantly modified the effect of Vitamin E on pneumonia.

Ban on smoking persuade light smokers to quit the habit, says study

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 6 : A recent study shows how bans on smoking at a certain place, led young people living in those areas to give up or never take up cigarettes.

In particular, the study found that young males, who were light smokers, were more likely to give up cigarettes after a ban came into effect.

Smokers, who lived in areas where there was never a ban, weren't likely to drop their cigarette habit.

However, smoking bans did not seem to affect tobacco use among women, although their use was already below that of men.

Co-author of the study Mike Vuolo said, "These findings provide some of the most robust evidence to date on the impact of smoking bans on young people's smoking."

Researchers can now find improved treatment for nicotine addiction

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 5 : A recent research could pave the way to end tobacco cravings after researchers crystallized a protein that holds answers to how nicotine addiction occurs in the brain.

The breakthrough at the Peter O'Donnell comes after decades of failed attempts to crystallize and determine the 3D structure of a protein that will help scientists to develop new treatments by understanding nicotine's molecular effects.

Co-author Ryan Hibbs said, "It's going to require a huge team of people and a pharmaceutical company to study the protein and develop the drugs, but I think this is the first major stepping stone to making that happen."

The protein, called the a4ß2 (alpha-4-beta-2) nicotinic receptor, sits on nerve cells in the brain.

Scientists aim at slowing down the rapidly growing cancer cells

Washington D.C. [USA], Oct. 5 : A new study gives greater insight into the growth of cancer cells, bringing researchers one step closer to the fight against the fatal disease.

The study identifies a previously unknown "off-switch" for cancer, based on the protein TMX1, that can serve as a new strategy for personalized medicine.

Cancer tissue is known to alter its metabolic behaviour by repressing respiration.

This metabolic switch accelerates growth of tumour cells and promotes resistance to cell death mechanisms, making cancer difficult to treat.

The study found that the reduction of the protein TMX1 can single-handedly exacerbate these characteristics of cancer cells.

Old age home residents are given sedatives to control their behaviour, reveals study

London [England], Sept.21 : A recent study has revealed that elderly care home residents are routinely being given dangerous 'chemical cosh' drugs to keep them sedated.

Despite a supposed crackdown on the use of the controversial pills, one in five is being given antipsychotics to control their behaviour and keep them calm.

According to a Daily Mail report, more than three quarters of the prescriptions were 'excessive' on these drugs.

The study stated that residents were often kept on the drugs for far longer than the recommended six weeks, and in some cases until they died.

Antipsychotics are tranquillizers which are meant to be given to schizophrenia patients to prevent hallucinations.

Arthopods Protected Their Young ones, Just as Humans Do Today, 430 million years ago

Arthopods Protected Their Young ones, Just as Humans Do Today, 430 million years

Busting the notion that modern-day parents are the first ones to keep tabs on their children to safeguard them from potential dangers, a new study has claimed that the practice began as long as 430 million years ago.

Published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study described a tiny, resourceful arthropod creature, Aquilonifer spinosus, which devised a unique way for baby tracking. Aquilonifer spinosus tethered egg pouches to its back with threads and followed its juveniles as they grew, in a similar manner as if they were tiny kites. The aim was to keep the young ones tethered to the adult’s body with strings so as to keep them safe.

Newly discovered alien planet has three Suns in its sky

A recently found exoplanet using Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) has three Suns in its sky. Though scientists know a number of planets with two Suns, the case of a planet with three bright stars in its sky is uncommon.

The newly discovered far away world, called KELT-4Ab, orbits a single star, and that star in turn is orbited by a close pair of stars.

A new study has revealed that the twin stars are sufficiently close to the planet to look as bright as the sky’s full moon is.

Besides coming up as an example of a solar system quite distinct from our planet, the odd arrangement could shed some light over the evolution of gas giants present close to their parent star, called ‘hot Jupiters’.

Ancient Arachnid Fossil may unveil Origin of Spiders

Ancient Arachnid Fossil may unveil Origin of Spiders

Researchers carefully examined a preserved fossil of an ‘almost spider’ to learn about the origin of spiders. The 305-million-year-old fossil was in Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris. It was unearthed in the 1980s by a fossil hunter, Daniel Sotty, in the rock of Montceau-les-Mines.

Researchers were unable to analyze the fossil previously because a large part of it was buried in that ancient rock. Only the abdomen part of the fossil was visible.

Now, researchers have used modern technology to view the buried part of the fossil. They used high-resolution CT Scans and developed a three-dimensional model that demonstrates different traits of arachnid.

Obesity among men has tripled and more than doubled in women, finds study

Obesity among men has tripled and more than doubled in women, finds study

A large study has reported that presently the world has more adults that can be classified as obese than underweight. Led by Imperial College London scientists, and published in The Lancet, the research has compared body mass index (BMI) in nearly 20 million adult men and women in the time period from 1975 to 2014. The researchers discovered that obesity in men has become thrice and over doubled in women.

Prof. Majid Ezzat, lead author, said that the condition is an ‘epidemic of severe obesity’ and has requested governments to take some action to deal with obesity.

Children with ‘bubble-boy disease’ May Soon Have a Cure, Glaxo’s Potential Treat receives Positive Response

Children with ‘bubble-boy disease’ May Soon Have a Cure, Glaxo’s Potential Treat

Patients of ‘bubble-boy disease’ may soon have a cure as Glaxo’s potential cure has cleared one more hurdle after a European Union regulatory panel stood into its support. If approved, the treatment will help children born with the rare immune-system condition.

On Friday, an advisory committee of the European Medicines Agency showed its support for the cure, which involves introducing a new gene into the sufferer’s stem cells. Positive attitude of the committee has made path easy for the treatment. There are high chances that it will receive approval in coming months.

The new therapy will be beneficial for kids with Adenosine deaminase deficiency, also called ADA-SCID. It is a disease that targets children and takes their lives if left untreated.

Scientists may have just snapped photos of alien Earth

Scientists may have just snapped photos of alien Earth

Scientists likely have captured pictures of an alien Earth at an early stage. The latest photographs, captured by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, have revealed that the planet-forming disk surrounding a close by sun like star known as TW Hydrae has a gap at nearly the same distance from the star as that of between Earth and the sun.
In a statement, study lead author Sean Andrews, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), said that earlier studies using optical and radio telescopes have confirmed that the star has a well known disk with features that clearly indicate that the planets could soon start forming.

Theranos could be offering inaccurate results with its blood testing devices: Analysis

Theranos could be offering inaccurate results with its blood testing devices

Theranos, a California-based medical laboratory Service Company, shot to success after developing a blood testing device named Edison, which uses only a few drops of blood through a finger stick unlike conventional technique that takes vials of blood via venipuncture. The developer of Edison and founder of Theranos Elizabeth Holmes made millions through her invention. However, a recent federal report found deficiencies in Theranos blood testing devices.

Video shows effects of laser hair removal in slow motion

Video shows effects of laser hair removal in slow motion

In case you are one of those who crave for a fuzz-free upper lip or want a hair-free flawless bikini line, laser hair removal is an option for you. However, before going for such a treatment, one must be aware of exactly how the procedure works.

On Wednesday, the YouTube science channel Veritasium released a video that displays the effects of laser hair removal in slow motion.

The laser treatment is quite successful in removing hair because it targets a molecule in the hair known as melanin. During the treatment, the melanin consumes energy from short pulses of laser light, burning the hair to a crisp.

Report: Irish men will be fattest in Europe in less than a decade

Report: Irish men will be fattest in Europe in less than a decade

A major report has recently revealed that men in Ireland are going to be fattest in Europe within a decade. It suggested that women are also likely to carry forward and rise in the obesity league table.

By 2025, 38% men in Ireland will be obese, taking the top position in the European and the UK list of countries suffering from obesity epidemic. Europe’s second fattest are going to be women in Ireland at that stage in case they don’t bring out any change in their present lifestyle trends.

Medical journal ‘The Lancet’ has cautioned that nearly 37% of Ireland women and 38% UK women will be obese by 2025.

NFL players more likely to suffer injuries during games played on colder days, finds Study

NFL players more likely to suffer injuries during games played on colder days

A latest study has found that NFL players have higher chances of suffering concussions and ankle injuries in the games played on colder days. In order to conduct the study, researchers in Canada examined data on the five most suffered injuries that occurred between 2012 and 2014 during two National Football League seasons.

The findings showed that players faced double concussion risk and a 1.5 times more risk of ankle injuries during the time when the temperature was 50 degrees Fahrenheit or colder in comparison to games played in 70 degrees.

The researchers also discovered that players had 1.36 times more risk of suffering shoulder injuries when they played games on natural grass and not on synthetic turf.

Ames Office of Education and Public Outreach invites space enthusiasts to view televised SpaceX Launch

Ames Office of Education and Public Outreach invites space enthusiasts to view

A public event will be hosted by the Ames Office of Education and Public Outreach to watch the televised launch of the eighth SpaceX mission to resupply the International Space Station (ISS) on April 8, 2016.

Public has been invited to take part in the event and to get information about Ames’ research launching on the mission from the US space agency engineers and scientists. The event will be held in Ames’ Conference Center, Building 3, in the time period between 11 am to 2:15 pm.

White-nose syndrome confirmed in little brown bat found in Washington

White-nose syndrome confirmed in little brown bat found in Washington

A little brown bat discovered near North Bend, Washington has been confirmed to have White-nose syndrome (WNS). The case has come as the first recorded happening of this shocking bat disease in western North America. The US Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center has verified the presence of this disease.

In other affected areas, WNS has spread at a quite fast pace in bats, killing over six million useful insect-eating bats in North America since it was documented for the first time roughly 10 years back. WNS isn’t known to be dangerous for humans, pets, livestock or other wildlife.

Accurate prediction of rising sea levels is actually double than that of most recent estimates, scientists suggest

Accurate prediction of rising sea levels is actually double than that of most

A lot of scientists have come forward to contribute to the expanding body of research predicting rising sea levels in the coming time. When it come to studies on climate change, it is possible to encounter set of statistics that could oppose another.

Such is the case of the findings of two US climate scientists, who suggested that the actual prediction of rising sea levels is in reality double as compared to the most recent estimates.

Moreover, the two researchers have said that earlier climate models have underestimated the likely sea level rise in the next century, and the Antarctic ice sheet meltdown. According to them, the accurate estimates may indicate disaster for low-lying cities.




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