Alberta

e-Mosquito – A New Device To Check Blood Sugar Level

e-Mosquito – A New Device To Check Diabetic’s BloodTo help millions of diabetes patients worldwide who need regular glucose monitoring, electric engineers from the Schulich School of Engineering at the University of Calgary have developed an electronic mosquito for them.

Based on the mosquito’s biting mechanism, the newly developed device can draw blood easily without any pain.

The electronic bandage, which is just about the size of a deck of cards, makes use of four tiny needles, which bite deep enough to take out blood from the capillary without causing any harm to the nerves.

Missing Alberta Girl Reunites with her Family

RCMP Sgt. Patrick Webb

Fast food can give your child asthma despite breastfeeding

child asthmaRecent research has shown that junk food increases the risk of asthma in children who tend to have lower risk of asthma due to breastfeeding. Earlier researches have shown that breastfeeding for more than three months lowers the risk of asthma.

Research team led by Anita Kozyrskyj, research chair in the department of pediatrics at the University of Alberta's faculty of medicine and dentistry analyzed data collected from 246 children, aged eight to 10, diagnosed with asthma, and 477 children without asthma.

Shell tests CO2 injection at oil sands

FORT MCMURRAY, Alberta, Nov. 30  -- Shell says it is launching a pilot program that could eliminate nearly half of the carbon dioxide output of a key plant in its Canadian oil sands operations.

Shell began drilling test wells this month that will inject carbon dioxide from its Scotford upgrader plant deep into a porous rock formation where it will be trapped.

Officials say the project could trap about 40 percent of the Alberta plant's emissions by 2014.

The Seattle Times reported Sunday that carbon dioxide is a significant drawback to the development of oil sands. The processing of the oil-soaked dirt in plants such as Scotford spews large amounts of greenhouse gas into the atmosphere.

New 72 mllion yr old dino species discovered in Canada

Washington, Oct 3: Fossils excavated in Pipestone Creek, Alberta, Canada, have revealed a new dinosaur species that perished in a catastrophic event 72.5 million years ago.

The animals are characterized by a bony frill on the back of the skull ornamented with smaller horns. They also had large bony structures above their nose and eyes which lends them their name: Pachyrhinosaurus (thick-nosed lizard).

These structures probably supported horns of keratin.

According to Dr. Philip Currie, renowned palaeontologist and Canada Research Chair of Dinosaur Palaeobiology from the University of Alberta who was involved in the excavation, Northwest Alberta was not previously known for dinosaur material.

Alberta infants tested negative for flesh eating disease

Alberta infants tested negative for flesh eating disease

Two infants were admitted in hospital in Lethbridge under suspicion of flesh-eating disease. These infants were than transferred to Calgary. Dr. Richard Musto said that reports of these children have shown absence of the organism necrotizing fasciitis.

He dispelled all the fear related to spread of this disease in children. He added that these two cases were mere coincidence.