Health News

Gluten-free diet in Celiac disease may still lead to intestinal damage: Study

Gluten-free diet in Celiac disease may still lead to intestinal damage: Study

Washington DC [US], Dec. 1 : Even after strict adherence to a gluten-free diet, nearly one in five kids with celiac disease sustain persistent intestinal damage, reports a study.

The article has been published in the journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

Findings were also consistent in adults, which showed that more than 33 percent of adult patients on a gluten-free diet have persistent intestinal damage, despite a reduction of symptoms or the results of blood tests.

"The number of children who don't heal on the gluten-free diet was much higher than expected," said Alessio Fasano, co-senior author of the study.

Winter is here! Sip some chai and kick-start the season

Winter is here! Sip some chai and kick-start the season

New Delhi [India], Dec. 1 : Imagine a piping hot cup of tea with some theplas or freshly baked cakes, in a chilly winter evening! Isn't that a 'perfect' sign-off to a long hectic day?

With such a thought in mind, 'Chaayos' have come up with 12 new inclusions in their menu, to kick-start the season!

At Chaayos, everything revolves around chai (tea)- from Bun Maska to Samosas to Keema Pav and Poha.

What makes this new range special is that it's topped with a unique Twist.

From the indigenous 'Gur Chai' to the Desi twist to 'Nachos' or Mexican tarka to 'Thelpa'- all these new entrants invoke the feeling of warmth in the otherwise cold weather.

Sedentary lifestyle may hamper scholastic performance in boys

Sedentary lifestyle may hamper scholastic performance in boys

Washington D.C. [US], Dec. 1 : According to a recent study, sedentary lifestyle is linked to poorer reading skills during initial three school years in six to eight-year old boys.

The article has been published in the Journal of Science and Medicine and Sport.

Conducted at the University of Eastern Finland, the study thus implies that sedentary lifestyle may impair academic performance in boys.

"Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and high levels of sedentary time in Grade 1 were related to better reading skills in Grades 1-3 among boys. We also observed that boys who had a combination of low levels of physical activity and high levels of sedentary time had the poorest reading skills through Grades 1-3,"

explained Eero Haapala, the lead author of the study.

Menstrual cycle doesn't impact training, performance: Study

Menstrual cycle doesn't impact training, performance: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study, published in the Journal of Physiology, has found that doing fixed intensity exercise during menstrual cycle does not affect a woman's autonomic heat responses (skin blood flow and sweating).

That's according to a collaboration between Massey University, the University at Buffalo and the University of Otago. They also found that exercise performance was impaired by humid heat due to the reduced ability of the body to sweat effectively.

Men, women look things in different ways, proves study

Men, women look things in different ways, proves study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study, published in the Journal of Vision, has found that men and women look at someone's face differently.

Women and men look at faces and absorb visual information in different ways, which suggests there is a gender difference in understanding visual cues, according to a team of scientists that included psychologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The researchers used an eye tracking device on almost 500 participants at the Science Museum over a five-week period to monitor and judge how much eye contact they felt comfortable with while looking at a face on a computer screen.

Smoking: Sooner you quit the longer you'll live!

Smoking: Sooner you quit the longer you'll live!

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : Planning to quit smoking? Then do it before you turn 70.

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that people aged 70 or older currently smoking were more than three times more likely to die than never-smokers, while former smokers were less likely to die the sooner they quit.

In the U.S., the number of individuals aged 70 years and older is expected to increase from 29.2 million (9.3 percent of the population) in 2012, to 63.6 million individuals (15.9percent) in 2050.

Study reveals how musician's brain processes while playing an instrument?

Study reveals how musician's brain processes while playing an instrument?

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study has provided an insight into how a musician's brain works while playing an instrument.

When musicians play instruments, their brains are processing a huge variety of information simultaneously.

Musical styles and strengths vary dramatically: Some musicians are better at sight reading music, while others are better at playing it by ear. Does this mean that their brains are processing information differently?

Flu in pregnancy doesn't increase autism risk in child

Flu in pregnancy doesn't increase autism risk in child

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : There is no link between mothers having influenza during pregnancy and an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children.

The study has been published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

The study by Ousseny Zerbo, of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, and coauthors included 196,929 children born in the health system from 2000 through 2010 at a gestational age of at least 24 weeks.

Within the group, there were 1,400 mothers (0.7 percent) diagnosed with influenza and 45,231 mothers (23 percent) who received an influenza vaccination during pregnancy. There were 3,101 children (1.6 percent) diagnosed with ASD.

Hemophilia can now be treated by simply swallowing capsule

Hemophilia can now be treated by simply swallowing capsule

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : Researchers have developed a less expensive, less painful treatment for hemophilia as the disease can now be cured by simply swallowing a capsule.

The researchers describe their system in the issue of the International Journal of Pharmaceutics.

Treatment for hemophilia can now be administered via a biodegradable system, a capsule, giving people affected by the hereditary bleeding disorder hope for a less expensive, less painful treatment option than conventional injections or infusions.

The researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin designed the oral delivery system, which contains micro- and nanoparticles, to carry a protein therapy that treats hemophilia B.

Sleep deprivation hampers child's brain development

Sleep deprivation hampers child's brain development

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : A recent study has found that sleep deprivation affects children's brains and his/her early brain development.

The article has been published in open access journal Frontiers.

"The process of sleep may be involved in brain 'wiring' in childhood and thus affect brain maturation," explains Salome Kurth, first author of the study and a researcher at the University Hospital of Zurich.

"This research shows an increase in sleep need in posterior brain regions in children," he added.

This contrasts with what researchers know about the effects of sleep deprivation in adults, where the effect is typically concentrated in the frontal regions of the brain.

Children with disabilities are bullied even as they mature

Children with disabilities are bullied even as they mature

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : Children with disabilities are victimized by bullying at a much higher rate than their peers without disabilities, reveals a researcher and bullying expert from University of Missouri.

The article has been published in Exceptional Children journal.

The study also revealed that this discrepancy in victimization and bullying perpetration rates remains consistent as children age.

Chad Rose, an assistant professor of special education in the MU College of Education, says this indicates that children with disabilities are not developing adequate social skills to combat bullying as they mature.

"This study points out the necessity for special education programs to teach appropriate response skills to children with disabilities," Rose said.

Research shows low calorie drinks actually boost weight

Research shows low calorie drinks actually boost weight

London [England], Nov, 28 : In a recent study, scientists have found that low calorie fizzy drinks could actually make you fatter than regular options.

Individuals following diet could gain better results by deterring from the supposedly 'healthy' variants, reports Express.

The report published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism journal narrows down the reason to the sugar substitutes used in the drinks.

Aspartame, the controversial sweetener that is deemed safe for human consumption by over 100 regulatory agencies in their respective countries, is one of the sweeteners named in the study.

Eating food at desk during office hampers worker's productivity

Eating food at desk during office hampers worker's productivity

London [England], Nov, 28 : According to a recent study, consuming smelly food at desk 'Al Desko' during office hampers the worker's productivity.

The practice has now become so prevalent that two thirds of people eat lunch at their desks most days of the week, reports Daily Mail.

And food with pungent smell like oily fish, cheese and egg sandwiches are having an adverse effect on working conditions and office culture.

In a survey of 1,000 office goers, two out of five said they were too occupied to go out for a lunch break, while over half maintained that those, who ate at their desks were 'anti-social'.

The worst smell was said to be mackerel or sardines, followed by cheese and eggs - yet fewer than one in five workers ask a colleague to eat somewhere else.

In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.

Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States.

"We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.

Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."

The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.

Does stress destroy person's ability to recall memory?

Does stress destroy person's ability to recall memory?

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 26 : Does stress impair memory retrieval ?

Though it's widely assumed that stress zaps a person's ability to recall memory, it doesn't have that effect when memory is tested immediately after a taxing event and when subjects have engaged in a highly effective learning technique, a new study reports.

In the last decade, the studies done on memory and stress have largely involved the participants, who were not guided in how to learn new material -- often simply attempting to memorize it by rereading or restudying, strategies known to build weak recollections.

Anxiety disorders could lead to skin diseases in teenagers

Anxiety disorders could lead to skin diseases in teenagers

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : According to a recent research, scientists have identified temporal patterns in young people. Arthritis and diseases of the digestive system are more common after depression in teenagers while anxiety disorders tend to be followed by skin diseases.

Published in Plos One, the research examines how physical diseases and mental disorders affect a person's quality of life.

If physical and mental disorders systematically co-occur from an early age, there is a risk that the sick child or adolescent will suffer from untoward developments.

The research group led by Marion Tegethoff in collaboration with Gunther Meinlschmidt examined the temporal pattern and relationship between physical diseases and mental disorders in children and young people.

Ab Crack: The all-new, exciting fitness fad

Ab Crack: The all-new, exciting fitness fad

New Delhi [India], Nov.26 : If you are still crazing over the six pack ab trend, you have perhaps missed out a crucial new body trend that has gone viral across the world social media: The Ab Crack!

Yes, you heard it right. The world has discovered a new flamboyant cousin to the six-pack in a new desirable body feature: the ab crack that refers to a thin visible crease or line of divide between your abs.

The term ab crack was first coined in July and has since then been the buzzword on social media, with many young women and men turning to fitness experts, aesthetic physicians and surgeons to find out how to get a perfect crack between the abdomen muscles.

World Obesity Day: Is your child's obesity giving you nightmare?

World Obesity Day: Is your child's obesity giving you nightmare?

New Delhi [India], Nov.26 : After the United States of America, the epidemic of childhood obesity is gripping India. According to an international journal, by 2025, India will have over 17 million obese children and stand as second highest country in the world with obese children as per Pediatric Obesity.

The rising prevalence of obesity in children is also bringing with it countless other adverse health effects, which make this condition a serious public health concern.

According to Satish Kannan, Co-founder and CEO of DocsApp, Obese children are at a greater risk of acquiring diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cardiovascular diseases, bone and joint problems, sleep apnea, and social and psychological problems such as stigmatization and poor self-image.

Scientists find association between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

Scientists find association between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : In a recent study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, the scientists expose a new biological mechanism that on one hand damages a very specific type of memory but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy.

Researcher Elham Taha explained: "In both healthy and sick brains, the relationship between the activities of the nerve cells that cause the transfer of information and activities delaying the transmission of information is extremely important. We know that damage to this

relationship forms the basis of various brain diseases, such as neuro-developmental diseases and epilepsy."

Beam Suntory India launches Peated Malts of Distinction portfolio

Beam Suntory India launches Peated Malts of Distinction portfolio

New Delhi [India], Nov. 25 : Beam Suntory today announced the launch of Two New Single Malts "Ardmore" and "Bowmore 12 year old" under the Peated Malts of Distinction portfolio in addition to the number one Islay malt, Laphraoig 10 year Old.

The launch of these peated malts signifies Beam Suntory's continued commitment to the Indian market and indicates the huge opportunity that Beam Suntory sees for malts in India, where its flagship brand Teacher's is amongst the leading scotch brand in India.

Beam Suntory offers an unrivalled collection of single malts under its range of Peated Malts of Distinction, to satisfy an array of consumer's tastes.

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