Health News

Eat walnuts and be stress-free!

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : Stress is inevitable for a college student following an intense daily routine, but a recent study has come up with a solution to alleviate stress and cheer you up.

In addition to the familiar mantra of healthy food, regular exercise and proper sleep, now a recent study published in the Nutrients journal, has found that walnuts could be a key to a happier state-of-mind.

In this first intervention study in humans, Pribis measured the effect of walnut consumption on mood.

Scientists find process by which APOL1 gene aids kidney disease

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : According to a paper publishedin the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, a Children's National Health System research team has come up with a novel process by which the gene APOL1 contributes to kidney disease.

Mutated versions of the APOL1 gene render people of African descent at heightened risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Employing powerful genetic approaches, the researchers were able to mimic APOL1 renal cell pathology in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

This opens the door to pinpointing other proteins that interact with APOL1, a vital first step toward identifying medicines to treat renal diseases that currently have no drug therapy.

Children admitted to ICUs develop acute kidney injury

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : A study published online in The New England Journal of Medicine has found acute kidney disease developing in children admitted to pediatric intensive care units.

One of every four children admitted to pediatric ICU's around the world develops acute kidney injury (AKI), which increases the risk of death, as well as longer and more intensive hospitalizations.

Moreover, the nearly 12 percent who develop more severe AKI have a further increased risk of death within 28 days, according to lead author Stuart L. Goldstein, MD, director of the Center for Acute Care Nephrology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Saliva test may help diagnose kidney disease: Study

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : Kidney disease can now be diagnosed with a simple saliva test which will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

The test may also help in predicting patients' risk of early death.

Simple and inexpensive tools for the diagnosis of kidney disease are lacking. Viviane Calice-Silva, MD, PhD (Pro-Kidney Foundation, Brazil) and her colleagues evaluated the diagnostic performance of a salivary urea nitrogen (SUN) dipstick, in Malawi, a low resource country in Africa.

Among 742 individuals who were studied, investigators diagnosed 146 patients with kidney disease using standard tests. High SUN levels were associated not only with the standard diagnostic tests, but also with a higher risk of early death.

Fear of putting on weight deter women from taking contraception

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : According to a recent research published in the Contraception Journal, concerns about weight gain may be driving contraception choices in women.

Women who are overweight or obese, are less likely to use birth control pill and other hormonal contraceptive methods.

"Weight gain is one of the most commonly cited reasons why women stop using hormonal contraception, and therefore may play a role in the risk of unintended pregnancies," said researcher Cynthia Chuang.

Although oral contraception does not likely cause weight gain, many women attribute increasing weight with the birth control pill.

The birth control shot has been associated with weight gain in younger women.

Hepatitis C virus gradually destroys immune defenses

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : A recent research cited in an academic journal titled Nature Medicine suggests that the virus that causes hepatitis C protects itself by blocking signals that call up immune defenses in liver cells.

"The finding helps explain why many patients fail certain drug treatments, and should help develop more effective alternate treatment protocols," said Ram Savan, the study's corresponding author.

Hepatitis C virus, the most common cause of chronic hepatitis and the leading cause of liver cancer, is primarily spread through contact with infected blood.

Each year, more than 30,000 Americans become infected and as many as 85 percent develop life-long chronic infections.

Individuals with sleep apnea may face worsened lung cancer

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : According to a recent research published in the Chest journal, an irregular lack of air, experienced by people with sleep apnea, can increase tumor growth by promoting the release of circulating exosomes.

Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with increased incidence of cancer and mortality.

In order to better understand the connection between the two, researchers took a detailed look at lung cancer tumor cell growth in mice.

Half of the mice experienced regular breathing patterns, while the other half was exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH) to simulate sleep apnea.

The team found that exosomes released in the mice exposed to IH enhanced the malignant properties of the lung cancer cells.

Teenagers resorting to e-cigarette may face serious lung health issues

WashingtonD.C. [US], Nov. 18 : A recent research published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care indicates that e-cigarette smoking can lay substantial effect on young smokers' health even if they do not later become tobacco smokers.

The lead author of the research Rob McConnell along with his team reported an association between e-cigarette use and persistent cough, bronchitis and congestion or phlegm in the Southern California Children's Health Study.

"E-cigarettes are known to deliver chemicals toxic to the lungs, including oxidant metals, glycerol vapor, diketone flavoring compounds and nicotine," McConnell said.

Newly developed Biomaterial could treat vascular bleeding

WashingtonD.C [US], Nov. 17 : The Science Translational Medicine journal recently reported about development of a universal shear-thinning biomaterial that may provide an alternative for treating vascular bleeding.

Developed by the researchers from Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the biomaterial has potential to protect patients at high risk for bleeding in surgery.

Endovascular embolization is a minimally invasive procedure that treats abnormal blood vessels in the brain and other parts of the body beginning with a pinhole puncture in the femoral artery.

This procedure is accomplished by inserting metallic coils through a catheter into a vessel, which induces clotting to prevent further bleeding.

E-cigarettes cause equal damage to gum tissue as regular ones:Study

Washington D.C [US] Nov. 17 : According to a recent research published in the Target journal, electronic cigarettes are equally damaging to gums and teeth as conventional cigarettes.

Led by Irfan Rahman, it is claimed to be the first scientific study to address e-cigarettes and their detrimental effect on oral health on cellular and molecular levels.

Electronic cigarettes are often perceived as a healthier alternative to conventional cigarettes.

In previous researches, scientists thought that the chemicals found in cigarette smoke were the culprits behind adverse health effects, but a growing body of scientific data, including this study, suggests otherwise.

Physiotherapy not beneficial for ankle sprains, says study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : It's better to deal with your ankle sprains on your own at home than to visit a physiotherapist.

A study published byThe BMJ reveals that physiotherapy does not benefit recovery when compared to basic self management of the injury at home.

Fewer than half of patients had not reached 'excellent recovery' by six months after injury, and there was little clinical difference between those who had received physiotherapy versus usual standard care.

Experts say the finding is important because management of ankle sprains has substantial financial costs, and alternative treatments should be sought to help recovery.

Gulp of red wine before smoking prevents vascular injury

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : Red wine helps prevent cardiovascular disease and drinking a glass or two of it, before lighting up a cigarette, can counteract some of the short-term negative effects of smoking on blood vessels, says a study published in The American Journal of Medicine.

Cigarette smoke causes acute endothelial damage, vascular and systemic inflammation, and cellular aging. Red wine stimulates the formation of endothelium-dependent relaxation factors such as nitric oxide, which improve endothelial function in coronary arteries possibly because of the high phenol concentration in red wine.

Your pessimistic attitude can kill you, says study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : A recent study published in journal BMC Public Health has found that pessimism is associated with risk of death from coronary heart disease (CHD).

People with high levels of pessimism seemed to have a higher risk of CHD-induced mortality, even after adjusting for known physiological risk factors whereas optimism did not seem to have any effect on that risk, found the researchers at the Department of Psychiatry, Paijat-Hame Central Hospital, Finland.

Optimism and pessimism in the scientific sense focus on people's attitude towards their future, whether or not they generally expect a greater number of desirable or undesirable things to happen.

Surgeons devise non-invasive, cost effective treatment for epilepsy

Surgeons devise non-invasive, cost effective treatment for epilepsy

Kochi [India], Nov. 16 : Neurosurgeons at a Kochi hospital has devised a non-invasive and cheap treatment for epilepsy, considered to be the first time in India. The treatment, which involves eliminating epileptic focus through radiofrequency has found to be completely successful in a patient, who had severe epileptic seizures.

"The 31-year-old patient from Kannur in Kerala came to us with daily multiple epileptic seizures for the past over 15 years and was drug resistant and the only option was a surgery," said Dr. Siby Gopinath, Neurologist and Professor at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre at Kochi.

Children of alcoholic parents face risk of underage drinking

Children of alcoholic parents face risk of underage drinking

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : Approach to preventing alcohol and drug use by some adolescents should begin in early childhood, suggests a study published in Developmental Psychology journal.

"The children of parents with alcohol problems are at much greater risk for underage drinking and developing a substance use disorder," says the study's author, Rina Das Eiden, senior research scientist at University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions.

"It's important to understand when and under what circumstances such problems develop, so we can craft interventions to steer this high-risk population away from substance use and its attendant problems."

Black women face greater risk of breast cancer than whites: Study

Black women face greater risk of breast cancer than whites: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : Black African women are more likely to be diagnosed with late stage breast cancer than white women in England , a new analysis by the Cancer Research UK and Public Health England has found.

Twenty five per cent of Black African women and 22 per cent of Black Caribbean women diagnosed with breast cancer are picked up at stage three and four. This compares to thirteen per cent of white British women.

This is the first time data on more specific ethnic groups and their stage at diagnosis from across England has been routinely released, helping to build a clearer picture of who is diagnosed at an early or late stage.

Stop Smoking Services facing budget cut: Report

Stop Smoking Services facing budget cut: Report

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : Stop Smoking Services across England are under threat as a result of ongoing budget cuts after six in ten local authorities (59 per cent) were forced to reduce their funding in the last year, says a joint report by ASH and Cancer Research UK.

Local authorities became responsible for Stop Smoking Services and tobacco control in 2013. These services were previously delivered by the NHS.

Cuts to the Public Health Grant from HM Treasury - which local authorities rely on to fund these services are putting enormous pressure on councils.

Cancer Research UK is calling on the public and local councilors to help protect crucial Stop Smoking Services and mass media quit smoking campaigns by urging Westminster to solve the public health funding crisis.

Cough virus helps combat liver cancer in adulthood

Cough virus helps combat liver cancer in adulthood

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 16 : A virus that cause respiratory illnesses and stomach upsets in children could help in the fight against primary liver cancer, according to a study.

Reovirus stimulates the body's own immune system to kill off the cancerous cells and is also able to kill off the hepatitis C virus - a common cause of primary liver cancer - at the same time, the researchers at the University of Leeds discovered.

These early stage findings are important because primary liver cancer is the third highest cause of cancer deaths worldwide and, if surgery is not an option, the prognosis is poor.

Nerve growth protein help maintain blood sugar: Study

Nerve growth protein help maintain blood sugar: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : A recent study shows that protein that regulates the development of nerve cells also helps in prompting cells in the pancreas to release insulin, a hormone that helps to maintain a normal level of blood sugar, says a study.

The research is potentially relevant to type-2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease.

In type-1 diabetes, which can appear at any time of life, the body makes insulin, but is either not releasing enough of it or not using the regulatory chemical efficiently to control blood sugar. In type-1 diabetes, which appears in childhood, an immune response gone awry destroys the body's ability to produce insulin altogether.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attack risk

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attack risk

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : A recent study has found that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, but have not had a heart attack or stroke previously.

Drugs that lower fat levels in the blood, called statins, were effective in reducing risk of death, heart attacks and strokes, across a broad range of patient groups.

The benefits were largest in people at highest risk for heart attacks and strokes but those at lower risk also realized some preventive benefits.

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