Health News

Dear boss, pay attention to your angry employees

Dear boss, pay attention to your angry employees

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.15 : Dear bosses if you are not concern about your employees' emotion then it may cost you billions of dollars as the latter may indulge in unethical workplace behavior, ranging from tardiness to theft, says a study.

The new research suggests that it is important for supervisors to pay attention to employees' emotions especially when the emotion is anger as they are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work, even if the source of their anger is not job-related.

At the same time, when employees are feeling guilty, they are far less likely to engage in unethical behavior than those in a more neutral emotional state, researchers found.

Rehabilitation post heart surgery reduces risk of death

Rehabilitation post heart surgery reduces risk of death

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A recent study has found that cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery helps the patient to deal with depression and significantly reduces the risk of death.

Depression has been known to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes, but if patients who are depressed attend cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery, their risk of death is significantly reduced, according to the study.

The study, conducted by researchers at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, found that patients who were moderately to severely depressed had a higher risk of death after cardiovascular surgery than patients with mild to no depression.

US robotic surgery expert stresses need for early cancer detection

US robotic surgery expert stresses need for early cancer detection

New Delhi [India], Nov. 14 : Early detection of cancer is critical to improving the quality of life of those suffering from this life threatening scourge.

Early detection is a surer way to add more years to a cancer patient's life. Technology companies are working on breakthrough solutions in cancer detection and treatment for the near future, a US expert in robotic surgery has said.

A WHO Globocan 2012 survey placed India's cancer incidence at 10,14,934 cases with mortality number touching 6,82,830.

Healthy lifestyle reduces even genetic heart attack risk

Healthy lifestyle reduces even genetic heart attack risk

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : A recent study has found that even among those at high genetic risk, following a healthy lifestyle can cut in half the probability of a heart attack or similar event.

It is a well known fact that following a healthy lifestyle, not smoking, avoiding excess weight and exercising regularly can keep one away from risk of heart disease.

But what about people who have inherited gene variants known to increase risk?

"The basic message of our study is that DNA is not destiny," says Sekar Kathiresan.

"Many individuals - both physicians and members of the general public -- have looked on genetic risk as unavoidable, but for heart attack that does not appear to be the case."

Two differing medications safe for patient undergoing heart procedure

Two differing medications safe for patient undergoing heart procedure

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.14 : According to a new study, two differing blood clot prevention medications are safe and effective for patients undergoing a non-surgical procedure to open blood vessels narrowed by plaque buildup.

The scientific community has proposed both medications as potentially superior to longer-term anticoagulation treatments for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

The new study sought to discover which of the two short-term treatment methods --using the drug heparin combined with a short-term (less than six hours) infusion of tirofiban, or short-term periprocedural bivalirudin, another medication that helps prevent blood clots during the procedure -- was more effective.

Diabetes can affect your skin too!

Diabetes can affect your skin too!

New Delhi [India], Nov. 13 : Diabetes is a very common problem these days.

Though people think excessive intake of sugar and sweetened food lead to diabetes, reality is, our unbalanced lifestyle also play a significant role in contributing to the condition of diabetes. Many of us are not even aware that apart from affecting our body, diabetes can play havoc on our skin.

Skin Specialist, Dr. Rohit Batra from Derma World Skin Clinic shared information on how diabetes can affect our skin and how we can combat this problem.

Some common skin infections due to diabetes are fungal infection, itching, vitilgo, blisters, Digital Sclerosis, foot ulcer and others.

Spinal surgery improves sex life-related pain: Study

Spinal surgery improves sex life-related pain: Study

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : A recent study has found that surgery is more effective in reducing pain for patients with degenerative spinal disease, compared to nonsurgical treatment. The spinal surgery also helps in reducing pain that interferes with sexual activity.

"Sex life is a relevant consideration for the majority of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis," notes Dr. Shane Burch. "Operative treatment leads to improved sex life-related pain," in addition to reducing pain and disability from degenerative spinal conditions.

Skipping breakfast, insufficient sleep increases risk of obesity

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : According to a new research, child obesity is linked to multiple factors such as mothers smoking in pregnancy, children skipping breakfast and not having a regular bedtime or sufficient sleep.

All three issues appear to be important factors in predicting whether a child will become overweight or obese. Since they are early life factors, they can be modified and the research highlights the possibility that prompt intervention could curb the growth in childhood obesity.

Being overweight or obese is linked to a child having poorer mental health, which can extend into adolescence and adulthood. This poorer psychosocial well-being includes low self-esteem, unhappiness as well as risky behaviours such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption.

Food-allergic students feel vulnerable in college

Food-allergic students feel vulnerable in college

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : In a recent study it was found that most colleges don't have integrated systems in place to support food-allergic students.

"Our study found that while many colleges offer support for students with food allergy in the dining hall, the same support doesn't carry over to organized sports, dormitories or social events" says food allergy researcher Ruchi Gupta. "That leaves students feeling vulnerable and scrambling to inform all the various departments of their needs."

The study found that while these students don't want to be defined by their allergies, they value feeling safe. They are willing to work with school officials to create more education around what administrators and other students need to know about food allergies.

Find out! Is your toddler allergic to peanuts?

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : Infants might be allergic to peanuts which make parents perplexed about when and how to introduce peanut-containing foods to them. A recent study that offers guidance on this topic will definitely help out parents without going "nuts."

"The first step is determining if your child is at high-risk for peanut allergy," says Amal Assa'ad. "Before introducing peanut-containing foods to a high-risk infant, the infant should be seen by their primary health care provider who will determine if referral to an allergist for testing and/or in-office introduction is needed."

Flu shots, access to medication help kids combat asthma

Flu shots, access to medication help kids combat asthma

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 12 : Kids with asthma require regular flu shots and schools with equipment and access to medications to treat asthma.

The study, presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting suggested that kids with asthma should get an annual flu vaccine and schools with equipment and access to medications to treat asthma.

The first study looked at outcomes for kids with asthma following passage of a bill in Missouri which provides schools with equipment and access to medications to treat asthma. It also allows trained school employees to administer bronchodilator treatments to students when needed.

Several ways you're damaging your bones, muscles everyday

Several ways you're damaging your bones, muscles everyday

New Delhi [India] Nov. 12 : Maintaining healthy bones and muscles as you age is extremely important in preventing debilitating conditions like fractures and osteoporosis, especially for women.

Bone density is the greatest when you are in your 20s, but after that you begin to lose bone mass, making your bones weaker and more susceptible to damage. While there is nothing you can do to prevent this from happening, there are certain lifestyle choices that can accelerate bone loss and muscles damage.

Here are some of the common habits that damage the health of your bones:

1. Alcohol Use

Diabetes can affect your vision- an eye-opening fact

Diabetes can affect your vision- an eye-opening fact

New Delhi [India] Nov. 12 : In India, diabetes is spreading like an epidemic. More than 651 million people are struggling with this condition which is not even sparing children and young working adults.

In 2015, almost 415 million adults were living with diabetes and the number is predicted to escalate to 642 million by 2040 (International Diabetes Federation). Diabetes not only affects the overall health of the body but is a deadly threat to the eyesight.

Lack of awareness, delayed diagnosis, improper diabetic management and opting home remedies instead of medical treatment often leads to eye problems related to diabetes.

Tips to prevent breast cancer in women

Tips to prevent breast cancer in women

New Delhi [India] Nov. 10 : Cervical cancer was once considered one of the most life-threatening diseases for women, claiming one life every seven minutes, as per data recorded in 2008.

Today, however, breast cancer has replaced it as the biggest cause of concern. It is one of the most prevalent maladies amongst Indian women and claims one life every 10 minutes. The rate at which breast cancer is spreading its fatal tentacles across India has much to do with unhealthy lifestyle habits. Early detection can help a woman control the cancer from spreading or becoming malignant.

Scouting helps in better mental health in later life: Study

Scouting helps in better mental health in later life: Study

Washington D.C. [USA] Nov. 10 : Taking part in the scouts and guides not only help you in physical, mental and spiritual development, but also lower the risk of mental illness in later life.

A study by the University of Edinburgh suggests that children, who participate in the organizations, which aim to develop qualities such as self-reliance, resolve and a desire for self-learning, are likely to have better mental health in middle age.

Such activities, which frequently involve being outdoors, also seem to remove the relatively higher likelihood of mental illness in those from poorer backgrounds, the results showed.

Tips for successful knee replacement rehabilitation in winters

Tips for successful knee replacement rehabilitation in winters

New Delhi [India] Nov. 10 : A total knee replacement (TKR) is a complex procedure that requires a Joint Replacement Surgeon to make precise measurements and skillfully remove the diseased portions of your bone, in order to shape the remaining bone to accommodate the knee implant.

Dr (Prof) Anil Arora is one among a rare group of surgeons in India who are adept at applying Pinless Computer Navigated techniques to joint replacement (arthroplasty) procedures. He is able to correct severe deformities using this technology.

However, several factors contribute to the recovery of any replacement surgeries, especially knee replacement. In spite of good surgery, rehabilitation plays major role in successful Knee Replacement.

Women have sharper memory than men: Study

Women have sharper memory than men: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 9 : Proving the notion wrong, that man are more intelligent and have sharper memory, a recent study found that middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures.

However, the research further suggested that the memory of women declines as she enter post-menopause. Women report increased forgetfulness and "brain fog" during the menopause transition.

In addition, women are disproportionately at risk for memory impairment and dementia compared with men. Despite these conditions working against them, middle-aged women still outscore their similarly aged male counterparts on all memory measures, according to the study.

Child's academic performance linked to gestational age

Child's academic performance linked to gestational age

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 8 : How your child performs in school has got a strong link with his/her gestational age, finds a recent study.

The study indicates that being born either too early or too late is likely to affect their academic performance.

The risk of cognitive and developmental problems in premature infants is well-established, but preventing preterm birth is limited clinically. By contrast, less is known about what happens to cognitive performance in children born post-term, or about the influence of birth weight variations within post-term populations, where there may be more scope for intervention.

Gold nanoparticles helps in delivering drugs into cancer cells

Gold nanoparticles helps in delivering drugs into cancer cells

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 8 : A recent research found that gold nanoparticles helps in delivering a drug right into the heart of cancer cells,

According to the new laboratory research, transferring effective drugs into cancer cells, particularly to where the chromosomes are stored, was one of the biggest hurdles in treating cancer. Gold nano-particles have proven to be well suited to being absorbed into cells, safely delivering drugs that could otherwise be blocked.

Researchers have been working on better ways to transport a drug directly into the control room of cancer cells, where the chromosomes are kept. This specific drug targets a molecule - telomerase - that builds up the protective caps at the end of chromosomes called telomeres.

People apply rules of their spoken language to sign language: Study

People apply rules of their spoken language to sign language: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 8 : In contrary to popular belief that language is not limited to speech, a recent study reveals that people also apply the rules of their spoken language to sign language.

According to Northeastern University, language is not simply about hearing sounds or moving our mouths.

When our brain is "doing language," it projects abstract structure. The modality (speech or sign) is secondary.

"There is a misconception in the general public that sign language is not really a language," said researcher Iris Berent. "Part of our mandate, through the support of the NSF, is to reveal the complex structure of sign language, and in so doing, disabuse the public of this notion."




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