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A new species of terrestrial crab found in Hong Kong

A new species of terrestrial crab found in Hong Kong

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar.23 : What the CRAB!

The scientists have found a new species of terrestrial crab, climbing trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong.

The species is described in the open access journal ZooKeys.

All specimens spotted during the survey have been collected at a height of approximately 1.5 - 1.8 m, walking on the bark of the branches at ebbing and low tides.

The characteristics of the newly found species are squarish predominantly dark brown carapace, very long legs and orange chelipeds.

The species is less than a centimetre long, with the studied specimens measuring between eight and nine millimetres, irrespective of their sex.

The chelipeds of the males appear stout, while in females they are distinctly leaner.

Restoring Pluto's planetary identity in crisis

Restoring Pluto's planetary identity in crisis

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 18 : A decade after Pluto was ousted from the planet lineup, a supporter of the now dwarf planet is fighting to restore its title.

Johns Hopkins University scientist Kirby Runyon wants to make one thing clear: Regardless of what one prestigious scientific organization says to the contrary, Pluto is a planet.

So, he said, is Europa, commonly known as a moon of Jupiter, and so is the Earth's moon, and so are more than 100 other celestial bodies in our solar system that are denied this status under the prevailing definition of "planet."

Absence of specific protein in brain may cause OCD: Study

Absence of specific protein in brain may cause OCD: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 17 : A team of German researchers has discovered that absence of a specific protein in regions of the brain may be the major cause of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Around two percent of the general population suffer from some kind of OCD, at least once in their life, where a person suffers from persistent intrusive thoughts by repetitive ritualised behaviour.

"We were able to show in mouse models that the absence of the protein SPRED2 alone can trigger an excessive grooming behaviour," said Professor Kai Schuh from the Institute of Physiology at the Julius-Maximilians-Universitat (JMU) Würzburg in Germany.

Beware! Your YouTube video viewing history can be tracked

Beware! Your YouTube video viewing history can be tracked

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 16 : Beware before watching that video on YouTube as your viewing history and other internet video platforms can be tracked, suggesting that video encryption is not as secure as we once thought, warns a study.

According to researchers, gaps in YouTube's encryption enable both government intelligence agencies, hackers and internet marketers to determine videos you watched.

Intelligence agencies could access this technology for tracking terrorists or other suspicious individuals.

Despite YouTube's attempts to safeguard user anonymity, intelligence agencies, hackers and online advertising companies can still determine which videos a user is watching.

NASA's Van Allen Probes uncovers 'relativistic' electrons

NASA's Van Allen Probes uncovers 'relativistic' electrons

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 16 : Earth's radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped regions of charged particles encircling our planet,were discovered more than 50 years ago, but their behaviour is still not completely understood.

Now, new observations from NASA's Van Allen Probes mission show that the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are not present as much of the time as previously thought.

The results show that there typically isn't as much radiation in the inner belt as previously assumed, which is good news for spacecraft flying in the region.

Did you know spiders eat 800 million tonnes of prey every year?

Did you know spiders eat 800 million tonnes of prey every year?

Washington D.C. [U.S.A.], Mar. 15 : A study shows that global spider population - with a weight of around 25 million tonnes - wipes out an estimated 400-800 million tonnes of prey every year, thus making an essential contribution to maintain the ecological balance of nature.

According to Zoologists at the University of Basel in Switzerland and Lund University in Sweden, more than 90 percent of the prey is insects and springtails (Collembola) and furthermore, large tropical spiders occasionally prey on small vertebrates - frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, birds and bats - or feed on plants.

The study was published in the journal 'The Science of Nature'.

World's oldest plant fossil discovered in India

World's oldest plant fossil discovered in India

Washington D.C. [U.S.A.], Mar. 15 : A team of researchers has discovered fossils of 1.6 billion-year-old probable red algae in India, indicating that advanced multicellular life evolved on earth much earlier than previously thought.

The study, appeared in the open access journal PLOS Biology, found two kinds of fossils resembling red algae - first type is thread-like, the other one consists of fleshy colonies - in uniquely well-preserved sedimentary rocks at Chitrakoot in Central India.

The scientists were able to see distinct inner cell structures and so-called cell fountains, the bundles of packed and splaying filaments that form the body of the fleshy forms and are characteristics of red algae.

New find paves way for 'brain-like' computers

New find paves way for 'brain-like' computers

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 13 : Turns out, brain is 10 times more active than previously measured.

This UCLA finding could change scientists' understanding of how the brain works and could lead to new approaches for treating neurological disorders and for developing computers that "think" more like humans.

The research focused on the structure and function of dendrites, which are components of neurons, the nerve cells in the brain. Neurons are large, tree-like structures made up of a body, the soma, with numerous branches called dendrites extending outward.

'Fishing out' radioactive elements from nuclear waste

'Fishing out' radioactive elements from nuclear waste

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 13 : According to a recent study, arsenic molecules might be used to "fish out" the most toxic elements from radioactive nuclear waste - a breakthrough that could make the decommissioning industry even safer and more effective.

The University of Manchester's Elizabeth Wildman reported the first examples of thorium with multiple bonds to arsenic to exist under ambient conditions on multi-gram scales where before they had only been prepared on very small scales at temperatures approaching that of interstellar space (3-10 Kelvin).

"Nuclear power could potentially produce far less carbon dioxide than fossil fuels, but the long-lived waste it produces is radioactive and needs to be handled appropriately," said Wildman.

Time to take that headache seriously

Time to take that headache seriously

Washington D.C.[USA], Mar. 5 : Headaches affect hundreds of people every day - but sometimes pain in the head can indicate a more serious condition.

The most common cause of headaches are tension headaches, migraines, cluster headaches and hormone headaches.

They can also be caused by colds and flu, sleep apnoea or temporomandibular disorders, which affect the muscles and joints between the lower jaw and the skull.

Dr Clare Morrison, GP at www.MedExpress.co.uk, has set out when people should be concerned about their headache and seek medical attention.

"Headaches can vary in severity from harmless and fleeting to meaning something far more sinister.

Species extinction affects complex ecosystems: Study

Species extinction affects complex ecosystems: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 4 : Research by the UK-based University of Southampton has found that methods used to predict the effect of species extinction on ecosystems could be producing inaccurate results. This is because current thinking assumes that when a species vanishes, its role within an environment is lost too.

However, scientists working on a new study have found that when a species (for example a group of sea creatures) is wiped out by a catastrophic event, other species can change their behaviour to compensate, exploiting the vacant role left behind. This leads to positive or negative effects on ecosystems, and in turn, either better or worse outcomes than current estimates would suggest.

Gang warfare not unique to humans - banded mongooses do it too

Gang warfare not unique to humans - banded mongooses do it too

WashingtonD.C.[USA], Mar.1 : Researchers from the University of Exeter have shed light on the causes of the fights - and found they are most common when females are receptive to breeding and when there is competition over food and territory.

The study has been published in the journal Animal Behaviour. The scientists, who studied a population of banded mongooses in Uganda, observed ferocious fighting between groups that often led to serious injury and even death.

During the conflicts, they saw individuals raiding dens and killing the pups of their neighbours, and males and females of rival groups mating with each other.

Egg-free surrogate chickens can save rare poultry breeds

Egg-free surrogate chickens can save rare poultry breeds

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 : To boost breeding of endangered poultry breeds, Briton researchers have come up with gene-editing techniques for the rare breeds to use them as surrogates that cannot produce their own chicks.

The advance -- using gene-editing techniques -- could help to boost breeding of endangered birds, as well as improving production of commercial hens, researchers say.

The appeared in the journal Development.

Researchers explained that donor primordial germ cells from other breeds could be implanted into the gene-edited chickens as they are developing inside an egg. The surrogate hens would then grow up to produce eggs containing all of the genetic information from the donor breeds.

Two largest satellite galaxies Magellanic Clouds bridged by stars

Two largest satellite galaxies Magellanic Clouds bridged by stars

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 8 : According to an international team of astronomers led by researchers from University Of Cambridge, the Magellanic Clouds, the two largest satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, appear to be connected by a bridge stretching across 43,000 light years.

The discovery is based on the Galactic Stellar census being conducted by the European Space Observatory, Gaia and reported in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS).

For the past 15 years, scientists have been eagerly anticipating the data from Gaia. The first portion of information from the satellite was released three months ago and is freely accessible to everyone.

Missile test row: U.S. enacts sanctions on Iran

Missile test row: U.S. enacts sanctions on Iran

Washington .D.C [USA], Feb. 4 : After putting Tehran "on notice" earlier this week in the wake of the ballistic missile tested by it, U.S. President Donald Trump's administration on Friday enacted new sanctions on Iran.

The Treasury Department said that it was imposing the sanctions on 25 individuals and companies connected to the missile program and those who were providing support to Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps' Qods Force, reports CNN.

This list also included three separate networks linked to support the missile program, which was opposed by US.

The tensions between the two countries have been on the boil since the election of Trump.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Washington D. C. [USA], Jan. 26 : Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

According to researchers, through healthy food and snacks HIV-positive people were more likely to adhere to their medication regimens, and people with type 2 diabetes, were less depressed and less likely to make trade-offs between food and healthcare.

The study, which appeared online in the Journal of Urban Health, was designed to evaluate whether helping people get medically appropriate, comprehensive nutrition would improve their health.

Include green leafy vegetables, nuts in your daughter's diet to boost her grades

Include green leafy vegetables, nuts in your daughter's diet to boost her grades

Washington D. C. [USA], Jan. 26 : Dear parents, boost your daughter's iron intake with green leafy vegetables, nuts, beans and pulses as a new study reveals that physically fit female students with normal iron levels may perform better academically.

Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Pennsylvania State University have found that a student's fitness level and iron status could be the difference between making an A or a B.

The findings, published in the journal of Nutrition, suggest that the difference in grade point average was as much as 0.34 -- enough to drop or increase a letter grade.

'We are going to make America great again': Trump tells supporters

'We are going to make America great again': Trump tells supporters

Washington D.C. [United States], Jan. 20 : Calling himself the "messenger" of a movement, President-elect Donald Trump vowed to make America great again.

"We are going to make America great again, and I'll add greater than ever before," ABC news quoted Trump as saying.

Trump was addressing a large gathering of his supporters at his inaugural concert, a day before officially being sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

"This journey began 18 months ago. I had something to do with it but you had much more to do with it than I did. I'm the messenger," Trump said.

He said that all Americans were tired of seeing what was going on in the country and wanted a real change to take place.

'You made me a better president': Obama tells Americans in thank you letter

'You made me a better president': Obama tells Americans in thank you letter

Washington D.C. [United States], Jan. 20 : Outgoing U.S. President Barack Obama has praised the American people for making him 'a better president' and 'a better man'.

"Before I leave my note for our 45th president, I wanted to say one final thank you for the honor of serving as your 44th. Because all that I've learned in my time in office, I've learned from you. You made me a better President, and you made me a better man, Obama said in a thank you letter to the American people on Thursday.

On his last day in office before President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration, Obama described the American people as 'the source of goodness, resilience, from which he has pulled strength.

Trump asks nearly 50 Senior Obama holdovers to remain in their posts

Trump asks nearly 50 Senior Obama holdovers to remain in their posts

Washington D.C. [United States], Jan. 20 : Incoming White House press secretary Sean Spicer said that nearly 50 senior Obama administration appointees have been asked by President-elect Donald Trump to remain in their posts after his inauguration in order to ensure continuity in the government.

The Obama holdovers include the highest-ranking career officials at key national security agencies like the Pentagon and the State Department.

Spicer said Deputy Defense Secretary Robert Work and America's third-ranking diplomat, Undersecretary of State Thomas Shannon, will remain in their agencies until a replacement is named by the Senate, reports VOA news.




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