Research

Men, women look things in different ways, proves study

Men, women look things in different ways, proves study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study, published in the Journal of Vision, has found that men and women look at someone's face differently.

Women and men look at faces and absorb visual information in different ways, which suggests there is a gender difference in understanding visual cues, according to a team of scientists that included psychologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The researchers used an eye tracking device on almost 500 participants at the Science Museum over a five-week period to monitor and judge how much eye contact they felt comfortable with while looking at a face on a computer screen.

Smoking: Sooner you quit the longer you'll live!

Smoking: Sooner you quit the longer you'll live!

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : Planning to quit smoking? Then do it before you turn 70.

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that people aged 70 or older currently smoking were more than three times more likely to die than never-smokers, while former smokers were less likely to die the sooner they quit.

In the U.S., the number of individuals aged 70 years and older is expected to increase from 29.2 million (9.3 percent of the population) in 2012, to 63.6 million individuals (15.9percent) in 2050.

Study reveals how musician's brain processes while playing an instrument?

Study reveals how musician's brain processes while playing an instrument?

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.30 : A recent study has provided an insight into how a musician's brain works while playing an instrument.

When musicians play instruments, their brains are processing a huge variety of information simultaneously.

Musical styles and strengths vary dramatically: Some musicians are better at sight reading music, while others are better at playing it by ear. Does this mean that their brains are processing information differently?

Hemophilia can now be treated by simply swallowing capsule

Hemophilia can now be treated by simply swallowing capsule

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : Researchers have developed a less expensive, less painful treatment for hemophilia as the disease can now be cured by simply swallowing a capsule.

The researchers describe their system in the issue of the International Journal of Pharmaceutics.

Treatment for hemophilia can now be administered via a biodegradable system, a capsule, giving people affected by the hereditary bleeding disorder hope for a less expensive, less painful treatment option than conventional injections or infusions.

The researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin designed the oral delivery system, which contains micro- and nanoparticles, to carry a protein therapy that treats hemophilia B.

Sleep deprivation hampers child's brain development

Sleep deprivation hampers child's brain development

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : A recent study has found that sleep deprivation affects children's brains and his/her early brain development.

The article has been published in open access journal Frontiers.

"The process of sleep may be involved in brain 'wiring' in childhood and thus affect brain maturation," explains Salome Kurth, first author of the study and a researcher at the University Hospital of Zurich.

"This research shows an increase in sleep need in posterior brain regions in children," he added.

This contrasts with what researchers know about the effects of sleep deprivation in adults, where the effect is typically concentrated in the frontal regions of the brain.

Can humans regenerate body parts like acorn worms?

Can humans regenerate body parts like acorn worms?

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : Is it possible for humans to regrow an amputated arm or leg, or completely restore nervous system function after a spinal cord injury?

It might be possible one day, as a new study of one of our closest invertebrate relatives, the acorn worm, reveals that acorn worms can regrow every major body part, raising hopes for regeneration in humans.

Acorn worms burrow in the sand around coral reefs, but their ancestral relationship to chordates means they have a genetic makeup and body plan surprisingly similar to ours.

Humanoid robot reveals learning process in toddlers

Humanoid robot reveals learning process in toddlers

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 29 : A new research has found that toddlers learn new words using the same method as robots.

The study suggests that early learning is based not on conscious thought but on an automatic ability to associate objects which enables babies to quickly make sense of their environment.

Dr Katie Twomey from Lancaster University, with Dr Jessica Horst from Sussex University, Dr Anthony Morse and Professor Angelo Cangelosi from Plymouth wanted to find out how young children learn new words for the first time.

The researchers programmed a humanoid robot called iCub designed to have similar proportions to a three year old child, using simple software which enabled the robot to hear words through a microphone and see with a camera.

Research shows low calorie drinks actually boost weight

Research shows low calorie drinks actually boost weight

London [England], Nov, 28 : In a recent study, scientists have found that low calorie fizzy drinks could actually make you fatter than regular options.

Individuals following diet could gain better results by deterring from the supposedly 'healthy' variants, reports Express.

The report published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism journal narrows down the reason to the sugar substitutes used in the drinks.

Aspartame, the controversial sweetener that is deemed safe for human consumption by over 100 regulatory agencies in their respective countries, is one of the sweeteners named in the study.

Eating food at desk during office hampers worker's productivity

Eating food at desk during office hampers worker's productivity

London [England], Nov, 28 : According to a recent study, consuming smelly food at desk 'Al Desko' during office hampers the worker's productivity.

The practice has now become so prevalent that two thirds of people eat lunch at their desks most days of the week, reports Daily Mail.

And food with pungent smell like oily fish, cheese and egg sandwiches are having an adverse effect on working conditions and office culture.

In a survey of 1,000 office goers, two out of five said they were too occupied to go out for a lunch break, while over half maintained that those, who ate at their desks were 'anti-social'.

The worst smell was said to be mackerel or sardines, followed by cheese and eggs - yet fewer than one in five workers ask a colleague to eat somewhere else.

In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

In path breaking discovery, scientists develop vaccine against opioid overdose

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : According to a recent study, scientists have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone (oxy) and hydrocodone (hydro) in animal models.

Published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, the vaccine also appears to decrease the risk of fatal opioid overdose, a growing cause of death in the United States.

"We saw both blunting of the drug's effects and, remarkably, prevention of drug lethality," said researcher Kim D. Janda.

Adding, "The protection against overdose death was unforeseen but clearly of enormous potential clinical benefit."

The new oxy/hydro vaccine takes advantage of the immune system's ability to recognize, seek out and neutralize invaders.

Anxiety disorders could lead to skin diseases in teenagers

Anxiety disorders could lead to skin diseases in teenagers

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : According to a recent research, scientists have identified temporal patterns in young people. Arthritis and diseases of the digestive system are more common after depression in teenagers while anxiety disorders tend to be followed by skin diseases.

Published in Plos One, the research examines how physical diseases and mental disorders affect a person's quality of life.

If physical and mental disorders systematically co-occur from an early age, there is a risk that the sick child or adolescent will suffer from untoward developments.

The research group led by Marion Tegethoff in collaboration with Gunther Meinlschmidt examined the temporal pattern and relationship between physical diseases and mental disorders in children and young people.

Scientists find association between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

Scientists find association between memory mechanisms, resistance to epilepsy

Washington D.C [US], Nov.26 : In a recent study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, the scientists expose a new biological mechanism that on one hand damages a very specific type of memory but at the same time provides resistance to epilepsy.

Researcher Elham Taha explained: "In both healthy and sick brains, the relationship between the activities of the nerve cells that cause the transfer of information and activities delaying the transmission of information is extremely important. We know that damage to this

relationship forms the basis of various brain diseases, such as neuro-developmental diseases and epilepsy."

DNA plays a role in selection of partners for educational achievement

DNA plays a role in selection of partners for educational achievement

Washington D.C [US], Nov. 25 : According to a recent study published in the journal Intelligence, people with genes for high educational achievement tend to marry, and have children with, people with similar DNA.

Humans generally do not choose their partners randomly, but rather mate 'assortatively', choosing people with similar traits.

Among the highest ranking qualities people look for in a potential partner are intelligence and educational attainment.

While it is well known that humans mate assortatively in relation to education - people with similar education levels marry each other - this is one of the first studies to show that this has significance at a DNA level.

High blood alcohol levels suppress appetite and weight gain: Study

High blood alcohol levels suppress appetite and weight gain: Study

WashingtonD.C [US], Nov. 25 : A recent series of studies published in the journal 'Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior', explored the relationship between feeding and alcohol consumption.

Conducted on rats, the studies showed laboratory rats will drink alcohol if it's available, and may even get a little tipsy. However, they won't voluntarily drink until they're drunk. And while ethanol is calorie-rich, rats that drink it eat less food and their total energy intake remains steady.

"I was looking at whether alcohol intake affects overall caloric intake and body weight change," said Nu-Chu Liang, who led the research.

Adding, "And the result, in terms of voluntary drinking, is that it does not - at least in rats."

Parental health behaviors are associated with child sleep duration

Parental health behaviors are associated with child sleep duration

Washington D.C [US], Nov. 25 : A recent research published in journal of Clinical Sleep Medication indicates that children's sleep duration may be influenced by parental sleep duration and confidence.

This further implies that efforts to address insufficient sleep among children may require family-based interventions.

Results of a parental survey show that higher parent confidence in the ability to help children get enough sleep was significantly associated with an increased child sleep duration of 0.67 hours per day, after controlling for potential confounders such as child age, gender, race/ethnicity, and parent education.

Overall, 57 percent of parents reported feeling "very" or "extremely" confident that they could help their child get enough sleep.

Dogs remember events from past, just like humans

Dogs remember events from past, just like humans

Washington D.C [US], Nov. 25 : According to a recent study, dogs have kind of "episodic memory", which gives them remarkable ability to remember and recall events from the past.

The study, published in the Current Biology journal, found that dogs can recall a person's complex actions even when they don't expect to have their memory tested.

"The results of our study can be considered as a further step to break down artificially erected barriers between non-human animals and humans," said researcher Claudia Fugazza.

"Dogs are among the few species that people consider 'clever,' and yet we are still surprised whenever a study reveals that dogs and their owners may share some mental abilities despite our distant evolutionary relationship," she added.

A century after their adventure, Antarctic heroes help make discovery

A century after their adventure, Antarctic heroes help make discovery

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.24 : The research, which says area of sea ice around Antarctica has barely changed in size in a century, was contributed by the heroes of Antarctic exploration.

Ice observations recorded in the ships' logbooks of explorers such as British Captain Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton and the German Erich von Drygalski have been used to compare where the Antarctic ice edge was during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration (1897-1917) and where satellites show it is today.

The study suggests Antarctic sea ice is much less sensitive to the effects of climate change as compared to the Arctic, which in stark contrast has experienced a dramatic decline during the 20th century.

Hop on with frog's evolutionary movements

Hop on with frog's evolutionary movements

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.24 : A new study, collecting genetic data by an international group of scientists, says that a common species of Asian tree frog may actually be two separate species.

If the two groups of frogs are confirmed to be different species, assigning their scientific names may require searching historical records of foreign explorers in Japan during the 1800s.

Before the frogs are officially recognised as two separate species, researchers will test if individual frogs from the two groups have unique physical or behavioral features and if they can produce healthy offspring.

Boozing may lead to some particular types of stroke

Boozing may lead to some particular types of stroke

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.24 : A study says that though moderate boozing up to two drinks per day is associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke, it seems to have no effect on a person's risk of hemorrhagic stroke.

High-to-heavy drinking was found to be associated with increased risk of all stroke types.

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and University of Cambridge, UK, suggest that the divergent associations of alcohol consumption with different types of stroke may explain some of the inconsistent findings of previous studies which investigated the association between alcohol consumption and stroke but did not discriminate between different stroke types.

Mothers take note! Your guidance helps kid improve his or her math skills

Mothers take note! Your guidance helps kid improve his or her math skills

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 23 : A mother's support helps their children develop better math skills.

A study has found that young children whose mothers supported them during play, specifically in their labeling of object quantities, had better math achievement at ages 4-½ and 5 years.

The study, conducted by researchers at Boston College, is published in the journal Child Development.

Early math knowledge is as important as early literacy for children's subsequent achievement. It can also predict later school success, income in adulthood.

The researchers developed ways to assess mothers' support of their children's math skills by examining how moms supported and guided their 3-year-olds' learning as they played with a toy cash register and blocks.




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