Research

Smoking fatal for diabetic patient: Study

Smoking fatal for diabetic patient: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 23 : It is well known that smoking is injurious to health and causes lung cancer, but a recent study has found that smoking is fatal for diabetic patients.

A study, presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) suggested that heavy smokers with diabetes are at increased risk of death.

Diabetes is a chronic illness in which there are high levels of glucose in the blood. One in four people with diabetes doesn't know he or she has it. Having diabetes can also put people at risk for numerous other health complications.

Father's involment in childcare lessens kid's behavioural problems

Father's involment in childcare lessens kid's behavioural problems

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 23 : A father who embraces parenthood confidently, helps the child to cope with behavioural problems, says a study.

A recent study published in the online journal BMJ Open found that kids whose dads adjust well to parenthood and feel

confident about their new role may be less likely to have behavioural problems in the run-up to their teens.

It's how fathers see themselves as parents in the child's early years, rather than the amount of direct childcare they give, that seems to be important, the findings suggest.

The nature of parenting in a child's early years is thought to influence their short and long term wellbeing and mental health, which are in turn linked to development and educational attainment.

Combining Ritalin with cognitive therapy helps traumatic brain injury patient

Combining Ritalin with cognitive therapy helps traumatic brain injury patient

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 23 : Combining methylphenidate with a cognitive therapy can help a traumatic brain injury patient , Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have reported.

Methylphenidate is a drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and better known by its trade name, Ritalin.

The study, believed to be the first to systematically compare the combination therapy to alternative treatments, was published online in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, a Nature publication.

Regular walking routine helps prevent heart disease

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 22 : A recent study has found that keeping a regular walking regime can help combat fatal heart diseases.

The study, titled "Walking for Heart Health: A Study of Adult Women in Rural New York" was published in Creative Nursing journal.

The researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York suggested that moderately intensive walking improves cardiovascular risk factors in the short term.

"We know walking is an excellent form of exercise, but research has been mixed on how successful a walking program can be in changing biological markers such as cholesterol, weight, blood pressure," said Pamela Stewart Fahs, associate dean, professor, and Dr. G. Clifford and Florence B. Decker.

Musical training helps treat autism: Study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 22 : Experiencing music at an early age can contribute to better brain development and may as well be useful in treating autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

According to a new study, presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), taking music lessons increases brain fiber connections in children and may be useful in treating autism and ADHD.

"It's been known that musical instruction benefits children with these disorders, but this study has given us a better understanding of exactly how the brain changes and where these new fiber connections are occurring," said Pilar Dies-Suarez, M.D., chief radiologist at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez in Mexico City.

Men take note! Sexism may harm your mental health

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 22 : Being sexist may affect your mental health, says a study published by the American Psychological Association.

The study published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, suggested that men who see themselves as playboys or as having power over women are more likely to have psychological problems than men who conform less to traditionally masculine norms.

"In general, individuals who conformed strongly to masculine norms tended to have poorer mental health and less favourable attitudes toward seeking psychological help, although the results differed depending on specific types of masculine norms," said lead author Y. Joel Wong, PhD, of Indiana University Bloomington.

Researchers convert waste carbon dioxide into biofuel

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 21 : Carbon dioxide , the most troublesome greenhouse gas, cannot harm the climate anymore as a recent study uncovers new ways to turn the gas into biofuel.

The article has been published in Applied Catalysis B Environmental journal.

Climate change is one of the most serious threats facing the world today. With the effectuation of the Paris Agreement, there has been a rising interest on carbon capture and utilization (CCU).

The study, led by Professor Jae Sung Lee of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST uncovers new ways to make biofuel from carbon dioxide (CO2).

Study traces origin of respiratory muscle

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 21 : A recent study published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences journal throws light on mammal-like reptile s, Caseids and their breathing pattern.

"Evolution has brought up some weird animals, such as the caseids." says Dr. Markus Lambertz, zoologist at the University of Bonn and the Museum Koenig.

Caseids are "mammal-like" reptiles that lived about 300-250 million years ago.

The barrel-shaped trunk got Dr. Lambertz' attention. How did these reptiles breathe? Exceptional joints impeded rib motility and allowed for only limited inhalation. Calculations revealed that the ventilatory system was not that effective, but still sufficient for a sedentary grazer.

Sponge-like bones as in osteoporosis

Food with avocado extract could prevent bacterial illness

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : A recent study has found that extracts from avocado seeds can potentially be used as a natural additive incorporated into ready-to-eat foods to control microbes that cause Listeria.

The study has been published in the Journal of Food Science.

Listeria is a foodborne bacterial illness that can be very serious for pregnant women and people with impaired immune systems.

Food products formulated without synthetic additives can be harmful for health therefore, food scientists are looking for ways to replace synthetic additives with natural ones.

Researchers from Tecnologico de Monterrey in Mexico compared enriched acetogenin extract (EAE) from avocado seeds with two name-brand synthetic antimicrobials.

Eat walnuts and be stress-free!

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : Stress is inevitable for a college student following an intense daily routine, but a recent study has come up with a solution to alleviate stress and cheer you up.

In addition to the familiar mantra of healthy food, regular exercise and proper sleep, now a recent study published in the Nutrients journal, has found that walnuts could be a key to a happier state-of-mind.

In this first intervention study in humans, Pribis measured the effect of walnut consumption on mood.

Scientists find process by which APOL1 gene aids kidney disease

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : According to a paper publishedin the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, a Children's National Health System research team has come up with a novel process by which the gene APOL1 contributes to kidney disease.

Mutated versions of the APOL1 gene render people of African descent at heightened risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Employing powerful genetic approaches, the researchers were able to mimic APOL1 renal cell pathology in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

This opens the door to pinpointing other proteins that interact with APOL1, a vital first step toward identifying medicines to treat renal diseases that currently have no drug therapy.

Children admitted to ICUs develop acute kidney injury

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : A study published online in The New England Journal of Medicine has found acute kidney disease developing in children admitted to pediatric intensive care units.

One of every four children admitted to pediatric ICU's around the world develops acute kidney injury (AKI), which increases the risk of death, as well as longer and more intensive hospitalizations.

Moreover, the nearly 12 percent who develop more severe AKI have a further increased risk of death within 28 days, according to lead author Stuart L. Goldstein, MD, director of the Center for Acute Care Nephrology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

Saliva test may help diagnose kidney disease: Study

Washington D.C [USA], Nov. 19 : Kidney disease can now be diagnosed with a simple saliva test which will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL.

The test may also help in predicting patients' risk of early death.

Simple and inexpensive tools for the diagnosis of kidney disease are lacking. Viviane Calice-Silva, MD, PhD (Pro-Kidney Foundation, Brazil) and her colleagues evaluated the diagnostic performance of a salivary urea nitrogen (SUN) dipstick, in Malawi, a low resource country in Africa.

Among 742 individuals who were studied, investigators diagnosed 146 patients with kidney disease using standard tests. High SUN levels were associated not only with the standard diagnostic tests, but also with a higher risk of early death.

Fear of putting on weight deter women from taking contraception

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : According to a recent research published in the Contraception Journal, concerns about weight gain may be driving contraception choices in women.

Women who are overweight or obese, are less likely to use birth control pill and other hormonal contraceptive methods.

"Weight gain is one of the most commonly cited reasons why women stop using hormonal contraception, and therefore may play a role in the risk of unintended pregnancies," said researcher Cynthia Chuang.

Although oral contraception does not likely cause weight gain, many women attribute increasing weight with the birth control pill.

The birth control shot has been associated with weight gain in younger women.

Hepatitis C virus gradually destroys immune defenses

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : A recent research cited in an academic journal titled Nature Medicine suggests that the virus that causes hepatitis C protects itself by blocking signals that call up immune defenses in liver cells.

"The finding helps explain why many patients fail certain drug treatments, and should help develop more effective alternate treatment protocols," said Ram Savan, the study's corresponding author.

Hepatitis C virus, the most common cause of chronic hepatitis and the leading cause of liver cancer, is primarily spread through contact with infected blood.

Each year, more than 30,000 Americans become infected and as many as 85 percent develop life-long chronic infections.

Individuals with sleep apnea may face worsened lung cancer

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov. 18 : According to a recent research published in the Chest journal, an irregular lack of air, experienced by people with sleep apnea, can increase tumor growth by promoting the release of circulating exosomes.

Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with increased incidence of cancer and mortality.

In order to better understand the connection between the two, researchers took a detailed look at lung cancer tumor cell growth in mice.

Half of the mice experienced regular breathing patterns, while the other half was exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH) to simulate sleep apnea.

The team found that exosomes released in the mice exposed to IH enhanced the malignant properties of the lung cancer cells.

Teenagers resorting to e-cigarette may face serious lung health issues

WashingtonD.C. [US], Nov. 18 : A recent research published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care indicates that e-cigarette smoking can lay substantial effect on young smokers' health even if they do not later become tobacco smokers.

The lead author of the research Rob McConnell along with his team reported an association between e-cigarette use and persistent cough, bronchitis and congestion or phlegm in the Southern California Children's Health Study.

"E-cigarettes are known to deliver chemicals toxic to the lungs, including oxidant metals, glycerol vapor, diketone flavoring compounds and nicotine," McConnell said.

E-cigarettes cause equal damage to gum tissue as regular ones:Study

Washington D.C [US] Nov. 17 : According to a recent research published in the Target journal, electronic cigarettes are equally damaging to gums and teeth as conventional cigarettes.

Led by Irfan Rahman, it is claimed to be the first scientific study to address e-cigarettes and their detrimental effect on oral health on cellular and molecular levels.

Electronic cigarettes are often perceived as a healthier alternative to conventional cigarettes.

In previous researches, scientists thought that the chemicals found in cigarette smoke were the culprits behind adverse health effects, but a growing body of scientific data, including this study, suggests otherwise.

Physiotherapy not beneficial for ankle sprains, says study

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : It's better to deal with your ankle sprains on your own at home than to visit a physiotherapist.

A study published byThe BMJ reveals that physiotherapy does not benefit recovery when compared to basic self management of the injury at home.

Fewer than half of patients had not reached 'excellent recovery' by six months after injury, and there was little clinical difference between those who had received physiotherapy versus usual standard care.

Experts say the finding is important because management of ankle sprains has substantial financial costs, and alternative treatments should be sought to help recovery.

Scientists discover two new species of lizards

Washington D.C. [USA], Nov.17 : Scientists have discovered two new species of lizards in the Andean highlands of Southern Chile.

The two reptiles, collected from areas of heroic past, were named after courageous tribal chiefs who have once fought against colonial Spaniards in the Arauco war. The study, conducted by a team of Chilean scientists, is published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Jaime Troncoso-Palacios from Universidad de Chile and his team found both new species near a lake in a pre-Andean zone among deciduous vegetation. Following the examination of the collected specimens and further analysis of their mitochondrial DNA, performed by Dr. Alvaro A. Elorza from Universidad Andres Bello, Chile, the scientists concluded that they belong to species unknown to science.

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